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Nintendo slammed with new lawsuit that claims the company knowingly sold Switch controllers that were broken

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Michael Marcano
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Chimicles Schwartz Kriner & Donaldson-Smith, a firm that specializes in federal and state class-action lawsuits, filed a suit against Nintendo "for claims relating to alleged defects in the Joy-Con controllers" for the Switch console.

The lawsuit claims that the Switch's $80 Joy-Con controllers "contain a defect that can result in the joystick moving or activating on its own ('drifting') and manipulating game play without manual operation by the user."

Dozens of Nintendo Switch owners have complained about Joy-Con drift for months; the lawsuit alleges that Nintendo "fails to disclose the defect and routinely refuses to repair the joysticks without charge when the defect manifests."

Switch owners in the lawsuit want Nintendo to "recover their out-of-pocket expenses related to repairs and/or replacement" of their Joy-Con," and and for the company to extend their warranty to cover the drifting issues.

This leads to an experience called "drift," where your character on the screen may move even when you're not touching the joystick.

While Nintendo says that it's aware of the issue, a new class-action lawsuit could bring it into the spotlight.

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Michael Marcano
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