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Therapeutic immunosuppressive agents, surgical removal are two popular liver fibrosis treatments available today

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Therapeutic immunosuppressive agents, surgical removal are two popular liver fibrosis treatments available today

Liver Fibrosis (also known as fatty liver disease) is a disease that can be either chronic or acute. Acute liver disease happens suddenly, usually due to some type of trauma. Chronic liver disease, on the other hand, occurs over time, sometimes due to a reaction to certain medications or a mild genetic enzyme deficiency. The two types of the disease are separated by a difference in symptoms, severity, and the treatment of the disease.

The possible treatment options for liver fibrosis comprise the use of therapeutic immunosuppressive agents, surgical removal or dissolution of an obstruction in the bile channel, change in diet, lifestyle modifications like lower intake of alcohol and cholesterol, control of blood sugar and lipid levels, and even medications for symptomatic treatment. Treatment options can be compared based on their effectiveness, side effects, the amount of damage they can potentially do to the liver, and cost. Therapy options include combinations of pharmacological, nutritional, surgical, or complementary and alternative treatments. The choice of therapy depends on the severity of liver cirrhosis, which is assessed through a series of tests. One must undergo liver function tests to determine the level of impairment, to determine the need for surgery or the need for a diet trial.

There is also some experimental liver fibrosis treatment available. For example, the Ayurvedic combination of Gastrodiazza (Moringa pteridosperms), Kutki (Picrorrhiza kurroa), Shatavari (Asparagus racemosus), Abhrak Bhasma, Suvarna Bhasma, Yashtimadhuk (Glycyrrhiza glabra), Chandan (Santalum album), Manjishtha (Rubia cordifolia), Saraiva (Hemidesmus indicus), Haridra (Curcuma longa), Amalaki (Emblica Officinalis), Patol (Tricosanthe dioica), Patha (Cissampelos pareira), Musta (Cyperus rotundus) and Nimba (Azadirachta indica). 

Another advanced liver fibrosis treatment is a combination of biological therapy with micro-nutrients and medical procedures. Clinical studies suggest that these treatments improve clinical outcomes, but there is no proof in this regard. This combination includes chemotherapy with carboplatin, bromocriptine, methotrexate, cisplatin, vincristine, vinblastine, gemcitabine, intravenous immunoglobulin, vitamin K, methotrexate, or combination treatment. Another advanced liver injury and treatment is called extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT), a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. This approach combines ESWL, which is an ultrafast laser treatment, with pharmacological agents such as doxorubicin, trifluoperazine, and chlorhexidine. These drugs interfere with protein synthesis, induce asthmatic-like responses, and reduce protein accumulation within the blood vessels. The combination of these two drugs reduces the amount of protein produced by the liver and thus prevents or delays the progression of liver fibrosis. Micro-nutrients support the cellular repair process, stimulate cell proliferation, and increase the expression of important molecules like superoxide dismutase (SOD), an antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (OR Rebel), and glutathione, that may be affected by oxidative stress. Cytokines released by inflammatory cells bind the SOD and OR Rebel to stop their activities and prevent their accumulation.

A radical new approach in fibrosis and liver injury is provided by fibrosis-activated cells (FACS). These cells, which are not part of the inflammatory immune system, but rather form a protective layer around injured tissues, cause oxidative stress, activating an inflammatory response causing fibrosis. They bind with oxidized proteins and trigger a release of cytokines, which in turn regulates the inflammatory response. This provides a natural repair system for injured tissues without the use of drugs. Although there is currently no cure for chronic liver disease, patients can take advantage of the many advances in treating this progressive disease.

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