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Boeing, Nammo Complete Long-Range Ramjet Artillery Test

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Sana khan

The successful test-firing of a ramjet-powered artillery projectile by Boeing and the Norwegian defence and aerospace company Nammo has further shown the practicality of one of the U.S. Army's modernization priorities, long-range precision shots.

A Boeing Ramjet 155 projectile was shot out of a cannon on June 28 during a test at the Andya Test Center in Norway, and its ramjet engine successfully ignited. It displayed stable flight due to carefully managed engine combustion.

The Andya long-range test comes after years of ramjet technology research, development, and testing by Boeing and Nammo, including more than 450 static or short-range tests.

In an effort to jointly develop and construct the following generation of boosted artillery projectiles, Boeing Phantom Works and Nammo have been collaborating. The Ramjet 155 projectile development and maturation contract was given to the Boeing-Nammo team in July 2019 as part of the XM1155 programme of the US Army. A Phase II technology development contract was given to the group in May 2021.

Ramjet 155 uses a supersonic projectile moving forward in an engine that uses only that forward velocity to compress the air pulled in combustion. The initiative, which is thought of as a cross between guided artillery and missiles, has as its goal the development of a universal round that can be used in both L39 and L58 cannons. In the upcoming months, more testing and demonstrations of the technology are planned as the team continues to refine and develop it.

International aerospace and defence business Nammo has its main office in Norway. Nammo is a top manufacturer of rocket motors, shoulder-fired systems, and speciality ammunition with more than 2,700 people, 28 production sites, and a presence in 12 countries.

 

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