logo
logo

Brain-controlled fighter jets more than just a pipe dream

avatar
Albert Colburn
img

For the past four years, a team of neurologists and engineers from the University of Melbourne, along with surgeons at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, have been developing an advanced brain/machine interface that is long lasting and easy to implant.

Eventually, the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DARPA , which funded the project, hopes to bring this mind-control technology to the cockpit, allowing pilots to fly by the thoughts in their minds as well as by the seat of their pants.

The electrode can measure electrical activity from the motor cortex, the part of the brain responsible for controlling movements.

Looking beyond ruminants, Lead researcher Dr. Tom Oxley envisions a future where this brain control interface could be used to interact with smartphones, robots, and more in the next 30 years.

The military appear interested in the potential for jet fighters to control their planes with direct thought control, rather than using their arms.

DARPA also plans to use the stenode to rehabilitate injured soldiers by allowing them to control a bionic exoskeleton.

collect
0
avatar
Albert Colburn
guide
Zupyak is a free content platform for publishing and discovering stories, software and startups.