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Here's why some computer scientists suspect your brain is just a fancy computer

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Paul Mize
Jun 09, 2016 18:24
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But he's probably best known in popular culture for his somewhat idiosyncratic ideas about the human brain: Namely, that thought and consciousness exist outside the limits of conventional, computational logic and physics.

Penrose, to summarize several books' worth of ideas in a single sentence, argues that the human brain transcends algorithmic computation through an exotic, undiscovered physics that empowers it to interact with the quantum world.

But the most important parts come down to the limits of our brains and sheer possible power of computers.Fundamentally, Aaronson said, he doesn't see any reason to accept that human brains are capable of processes and answering problems that conventional computers — if supplied with enough power and the right software — could not.Humans as a group might seem to converge toward some truths you can't achieve through formal logic, Aaronson argues.

But there's no reason to believe that that's a result of anything other than trial and error and the scientific method, both skills computers could conceivably learn.Further, he doesn't see any reason a complete human brain couldn't be simulated in a computer, even if right now we lack the power:A biologist asked how I could possibly have any confidence that the brain is simulable by a computer, given how little we know about neuroscience.

I replied that, for me, the relevant issues here are well below neuroscience in the reductionist hierarchy.

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Paul Mize
Jun 09, 2016 18:24
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