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Taylor Swift Wants YouTube To Treat Artists More Fairly, Too

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Harold Roscoe
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Hahn Lionel/ABACA USA Taylor Swift attends the Costume Institute Benefit Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 2, 2016.

Taylor Swift, Sir Paul McCartney and U2 are among those set to join the music industry s increasingly loud battle with the world s largest music service: YouTube.

Enacted way back in 1998, the DMCA offers certain protections — sometimes called safe harbor — for websites hosting copyrighted content.

In an open letter to be published Tuesday in D.C.-based publications The Hill, Politico and Roll Call, dozens of artists and major record labels call for reforming the DMCA, according to multiple reports.

Those same labels believe that the DMCA gives big tech companies like YouTube a leg up in negotiating fees — meaning less revenue is making its way back to music creators.

YouTube — which says it has paid out a whopping $3 billion to the music industry so far — disagrees with the idea that it is hiding behind the DMCA, pointing to its Content ID system as proof the company aggressive finds and deletes unlawful content on the site.Content ID automatically scans content in an attempt to catch copyrighted material early on to save labels from even having to issue a formal takedown notice.

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Harold Roscoe
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