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Taylor Swift, Paul McCartney, and the music industry’s new war on YouTube

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John Nelson
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When s the last time you can remember Taylor Swift and Katy Perry agreeing on anything?

Well, the embattled pop stars have something in common now: Hundreds of musicians and labels have signed a new petition calling for reforms of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, a two-decades old piece of legislation which makes it legal for sites like YouTube to host any piece of user-uploaded content, which makes it nearly impossible to rid the net of illegally-hosted content.

The advocates claim that reforms to the law would help industry members avoid the losses and hassles from persistent copyright infringement.

They put ads before everything, making big money and artists don t get paid – or don t get paid enough – and that s fine, apparently, said Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke of the service in an interview with the Telegraph last December, But if they don t get profit from ad-blocking then no, it s not fair … I don t have a solution for these problems.

The petition originally appeared in print on Tuesday as an advertisement in Washington DC magazines Politico, The Hill, and Roll Call, with 180 musician signatures and 19 music-affiliated organizations and companies.

The list has since grown to include even more big names, such as that of indie rocker Jack White.

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