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Auto, technology industries clash over talking cars

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James Maloch
Aug 25, 2016 18:14
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MoreFILE - In this July 20, 2015 file photo, a pedestrian crosses in front of a vehicle as part of a demonstration at Mcity on its opening day on the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor, Mich. Automakers say cars that wirelessly talk to each other are finally ready for the road.

The cars hold the potential to dramatically reduce traffic deaths, improve the safety of self-driving cars and someday maybe even help solve traffic jams.

WASHINGTON AP -- Cars that wirelessly talk to each other are finally ready for the road, creating the potential to dramatically reduce traffic deaths, improve the safety of self-driving cars and someday maybe even help solve traffic jams, automakers and government officials say.

The cable television and high-tech industries want to take away a large share of the radio airwaves the government dedicated for transportation in 1999, and use it instead for superfast Wi-Fi service.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is expected to propose as early as next month that new cars and trucks come equipped with it.

General Motors isn't waiting for the proposal, saying it will include V2V in Cadillac CTS sedans before the end of the year.

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James Maloch
Aug 25, 2016 18:14
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