logo
logo

Skyscrapers Overtake Suburban Sprawl as Tech’s Towering Status Symbol

avatar
Billy Clark
img

For a city synonymous with the tech industry, San Francisco used to host few actual tech companies.

Plenty of techies lived there, sure, but each morning they boarded their Wi-Fi–connected luxury buses and commuted south to Silicon Valley, where the world’s innovation class worked long hours on sprawling, lush campuses.

These old buildings—with their low ceilings, cubicles, darkness at noon—were never conducive to fostering that special magic tech companies seek: “culture,” where hoped-for creative geniuses can disrupt and iterate and optimize.

Now even suburban campuses and open floor plan warehouses often don’t cut it.

These buildings don’t provide that other side of the culture coin, an appeal earnest tech companies are reluctant to cop to: status.

With Salesforce Tower and nearby (and still rising) 43-story Park Tower, developers have adapted tall buildings to tech’s taste, says Jack Nelson, a research analyst at JLL, a real estate services firm.

collect
0
avatar
Billy Clark
guide
Zupyak is a free content platform for publishing and discovering stories, software and startups.