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CWRU awarded funding to understand how plant particle stimulates anti-tumor response

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Porter Johnson
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Nicole Steinmetz, PhD, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Radiology, member of the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Center for RNA Science and Therapeutics in the Division of General Medical Sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and the holder of the George J. Picha Designated Professor in Biomaterials, has received a major grant from the National Institutes of Health to help understand how a virus-like particle from plants stimulates potent anti-tumor responses.

For the funded study, Steinmetz is teamed up with Steve Fiering, PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology at Geisel Medical School at Dartmouth.

"It also offers potential to fight cancer in dogs, who are of course members of our families as well.

Under the grant, Steinmetz and colleagues will further test a tiny nanoparticle-based therapeutic that her team developed which targets the body's own cancer immunity cycle.

"In recent years the funding of grants with multiple leaders, such as this one, has been increasingly supported by the National Institutes of Health," said Fiering.

Researchers have long known that a person's immune system has the potential to recognize and destroy tumor cells.

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