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After false Hawaii missile notice, FCC launches investigation

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Robert Massaro
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On Saturday, January 13, Hawaiians received a terrifying message on their phones, repeated on television and radio stations, which had received a similar alert: “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII.

In a press conference on Saturday after the incident, Hawaii Governor David Ige said that "human error" had caused the false alarm.

HI-EMA did not have an automated way to send a cancellation of an "event" message, so it had to issue one manually, Governor Ige said in the press conference, which caused a delay in correcting the notification.

While HI-EMA issued clarifications on Facebook and Twitter, which Hawaiian leaders shared, the lack of an "all-clear" from the same outlet that the alert had come from caused concern.

HI-EMA said that immediately after the alert, the agency instituted a system that would require two people to sign off on a missile alert.

Several minutes after the alert was sent out, Hawaiian state representative Tulsi Gabbard tweeted "HAWAII - THIS IS A FALSE ALARM.

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Robert Massaro
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