logo
logo

Children's awarded $2.6M to study stem cells for CHD-related neurological complications

avatar
Toby Taft
img

WASHINGTON - (Jan. 17, 2017) - The National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded researchers at Children's National Health System $2.6 million to expand their studies into whether human stem cells could someday treat and even reverse neurological damage in infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD).

Researchers estimate that 1.3 million infants are born each year with CHD, making it the most common major birth defect.

Over the past 30 years, advances in medical technology and surgical practices have dramatically decreased the percentage of infants who die from CHD -- from a staggering rate of nearly 100 percent just a few decades ago to the current mortality rate of less than 10 percent.

The increased survival rate comes with new challenges: Children with complex CHD are increasingly diagnosed with significant neurodevelopmental delay or impairment.

Clinical studies demonstrate that CHD can reduce oxygen delivery to the brain, a condition known as hypoxia, which can severely impair brain development in fetuses and newborns whose brains are developing rapidly.

Nobuyuki Ishibashi, M.D., the study's lead investigator with the Center for Neuroscience Research and director of the Cardiac Surgery Research Laboratory at Children's National, proposes transfusing human stem cells in experimental models through the cardiopulmonary bypass machine used during cardiac surgery.

collect
0
avatar
Toby Taft
guide
Zupyak is a free content platform for publishing and discovering stories, software and startups.