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Researchers seek to improve quality control for nanomanufacturing

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Robert Massaro
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Researchers from the University of Houston are developing a new quality control tool for continuous nanomanufacturing, a key step in moving nanodevices from the lab to the real world.

"Nanomanufacturing sounds great, but it really has to be scalable," said Venkat Selvamanickam, MD Anderson Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering.

Selvamanickam is working with Nanomanufacturing Systems for mobile Computing and Energy Technologies (NASCENT), a multi-institution partnership led by the University of Texas at Austin, to develop the new tool, which will adapt Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction for use with roll-to-roll continuous manufacturing processes.

The work will be done under the auspices of the UH Advanced Manufacturing Institute; UH will receive about $340,000 from the National Science Foundation for the project.

One of the world's leading experts on manufacturing superconductors, Selvamanickam oversees manufacturing activity at the University's Energy Research Park, including the advanced manufacturing of high-performance superconductor wires for next-generation electric machines.

He is also director of the Applied Research Hub at the Texas Center for Superconductivity at UH and manages the Advanced Manufacturing Institute, an umbrella organization designed to help researchers make the leap between discovery and commercialization.

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