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Novel therapy delays muscle atrophy in Lou Gehrig's disease model

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Jonathan Spitzer
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Supplementing a single protein found in the spinal cord could help prevent symptoms of Lou Gehrig's disease, according to a new study out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

Lou Gehrig's disease, or amyloid lateral sclerosis (ALS), is a progressive disorder that devastates motor nerve cells.

People with ALS slowly lose the ability to control muscle movement, and are ultimately unable to speak, eat, move, or breathe.

For the estimated 15,000 Americans living with ALS, the findings offer new hope for ways to delay symptoms.

"Amazingly, we could delay ALS symptom onset by 67 days."

In late stages of the disease, mice with high Mfn2 levels in these nerves were a healthy weight, and did not have any of the muscle atrophy, gait abnormalities, or reduced grip strength that mice in control groups developed.

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