logo
logo

Focused delivery for brain cancers

avatar
Edgar Williams
Sep 04, 2018 21:42
img

Not only can such a growth disrupt vital functions, but operating in this area is so risky, many medical professionals refuse to consider it as an option.

New, interdisciplinary research in Washington University in St. Louis has shown a way to target drug delivery to just that area of the brain using noninvasive measures, bolstered by a novel technology: focused ultrasound.

The research comes from the lab of Hong Chen, assistant professor of biomedical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science and assistant professor of radiation oncology at Washington University School of Medicine.

Chen has developed a novel way in which ultrasound and its contrast agent -- consisting of tiny bubbles -- can be paired with intranasal administration, to direct a drug to the brainstem.

The research, which also included faculty from the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology and the Department of Pediatrics at the School of Medicine, along with the Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, was published online this week and will be in the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of Controlled Release.

This technique may bring medicine one step closer to curing brain-based diseases such as diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG), a childhood brain cancer with a five-year survival rate of a scant two percent, a dismal prognosis that has remained unchanged over the past 40 years.

collect
0
avatar
Edgar Williams
Sep 04, 2018 21:42
guide
Zupyak is a free content platform for publishing and discovering stories, software and startups.