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Blacklists and redlists: How China’s Social Credit System actually works

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Michael Morehead
Oct 23, 2018 08:37
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The idea is simple: By keeping and aggregating records throughout the government’s various ministries and departments, Chinese officials can gain insight into how people behave and develop ways to control them.

According to the planning outline released by the State Council, China’s cabinet, in mid-2014, the system’s objective is to encourage individuals to be trustworthy under the law and dissuade against breaking trust to promote a “sincerity culture.”

Even so, an intricate web of social credit systems is coming to China—only perhaps not in the way, or at the speed, that’s generally expected.

The concept of a system of social credit first emerged in 1999 when officials aimed to strengthen trust in the country’s emerging market economy.

However, the focus quickly shifted from building financial creditworthiness to encompass the moral actions of the country’s enterprises, officials, judiciary, and citizens.

Lower-rated citizens had a harder time accessing social welfare and government housing.

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Michael Morehead
Oct 23, 2018 08:37
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