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Vivian Matthews 2016-05-21
img

It may not be even remotely close to what The Doctor uses, but a team at the University of Bristol has created a sonic screwdriver that utilises the powers of acoustic levitation to move objects.

The screwdriver, along with what they re calling a Gauntlet of Levitation, were created as a way to help humans control acoustic levitation in order to interact with dangerous materials.

The presented prototypes still have limited forces but symbolise a milestone in our expectations of future technology, the researchers stated in an abstract posted on the Bristol Interaction Group s website.

As shown in the video, smaller pieces can be rotated, which can be helpful in medical procedures or experiments involving dangerous materials.

Single-beam levitation could manipulate particles inside our body for applications in targeted drug delivery or acoustically controlled micro-machines that do not interfere with magnetic resonance imaging, the study stated.

So we re not exactly close yet, but maybe we will be in a few thousand years.

collect
0
Blaine Pilgrim 2016-05-21
img

GIF

It may not be even remotely close to what The Doctor uses on Doctor Who, but a team at the University of Bristol in England has created a sonic screwdriver that utilizes the powers of acoustic levitation to move objects.

The screwdriver, along with what they re calling a Gauntlet of Levitation, were created as a way to help humans control acoustic levitation in order to interact with dangerous materials.

The presented prototypes still have limited forces but symbolize a milestone in our expectations of future technology, the researchers stated in an abstract posted on the Bristol Interaction Group s website.

As shown in the video, smaller pieces can be rotated, which can be helpful in medical procedures or experiments involving dangerous materials.

Single-beam levitation could manipulate particles inside our body for applications in targeted drug delivery or acoustically controlled micro-machines that do not interfere with magnetic resonance imaging, the study stated.

So we re not exactly close yet, but maybe we will be in a few thousand years.

collect
0
Walter Winkel 2016-09-22
img

We re all familiar with holograms, the projected 3D images created by manipulating light.

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute in Germany used tiny silicone beads assemble into patterns on the surface of water, holding that shape for as long as the sound persisted.

Only we don t generate an image using light, Fischer said.

Playback isn't supported on this device.

Fischer and his colleagues made pretty water rings in the shape of dove, levitated a water drop, and propelled little paper boats across the surface.

They did it using acoustic levitation, a technique often used to study bubbles and foams, among other applications, suspending them in mid-air to keep gravity from causing them to coarsen.

collect
0
Malcolm Vanderveen 2016-08-15
img

Sound has remarkable effects on the human mind.

It can delight us, scare us, depress us and uplift us.

But now, for the first time, physicists have shown that it can uplift physical objects too - in this case, a five centimetre polystyrene ball - using a principle called 'acoustic levitation'.

A team of researchers used three ultrasound transducers - which convert electric current into ultrasonic waves - to create a acoustic levitation device capable of hovering the ball in mid-air, about 7mm away from external surfaces.

Similar devices have previously levitated much smaller objects, but this is the first time that the technique has been used something something so large.

The team, split between the University of São Paulo in Brazil and Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, accomplished the feat by creating a standing wave between the transducers and the ball.

collect
0
Vivian Matthews 2016-09-22
img

We re all familiar with holograms by now, the projected 3D images created by manipulating light.

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute in Germany used tiny silicone beads assemble into patterns on the surface of water, holding that shape for as long as the sound persisted.

Only we don t generate an image using light, Fischer said.

Fischer and his colleagues made pretty water rings in the shape of dove, levitated a water drop, and propelled little paper boats across the surface.

They did it using acoustic levitation, a technique often used to study bubbles and foams, among other applications, suspending them in mid-air to keep gravity from causing them to coarsen.

Image: P. Fischer et al./Nature

collect
0
Robert Holloway 2018-05-15
img

Reg Lecture explores tractor beam tech...

The benefits of tractor beam technology are well known - out-running delinquents on your hoverboard, hurling enemies around at a distance, and of course, capturing fleeing rebel spacecraft.

While the principles of the technology are reasonably understood, to date boffins have struggled to move anything substantial.

Engineers at the University of Bristol recently demonstrated it’s possible to trap objects largest than the wavelength of a sound wave using an acoustic tractor beam.

They employed a rotating sound field using 40kHz ultrasonic waves – a pitch usually employed by bats - to suspend a 2cm polystyrene ball.

Join Dr Asier Marzo, one of those behind this breakthrough, on Wednesday 23 May as he explains to Reg readers the working principles of acoustic levitation and its applications and challenges.

collect
0
Dion Esparza 2017-08-15
img

Levitation techniques are no longer confined to the laboratory thanks to University of Bristol engineers who have developed an easier way for suspending matter in mid-air by developing a 3D-printed acoustic levitator.

This new technique, published in Review of Scientific Instruments, could be applied to a range of applications, including blood tests.

Anyone who has felt their chest vibrating with the energy of the soundwaves at a festival is already familiar with the principle behind acoustic levitation.

By using ultrasound - a high-pitched sound above human hearing - it is possible to use powerful vibrations without causing any harm to humans.

Magnetic levitation uses magnetic fields to suspend objects in mid-air.

Using parking sensors, a motor driver, an Arduino (a single board microcontroller) and a 3D-printed part, the University of Bristol team has developed an instruction pack for those wanting to assemble their own levitator at home or school.

collect
0
Rosalie Lee 2018-04-06
img

WASHINGTON, D.C., April 6, 2018 -- Science promises to sound more exciting than ever at this year's Acoustical Society of America meeting.

Presenters will reveal the latest in acoustics research with insight into topics like how new materials could control acoustic waves, improving audio in virtual reality, acoustic levitation, and how certain insects use acoustics to attract a mate, as well as much more.

The meeting will be held May 7-11, 2018, at the Hyatt Regency in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Over 900 abstracts were submitted for the meeting dealing with sound and its applications in physics, engineering, medicine, linguistics, psychology, ecology and more.

Journalists may also remotely access meeting information with ASA's World Wide Press Room, which will go live once the meeting begins, and host the latest press releases as well as approximately 40 lay language articles about work to be presented.

Live media webcasts featuring a selection of newsworthy research will take place during the meeting.

collect
0
Theodore Davis 2018-05-01
img

Bristol boffin joins The Register to talk acoustic levitation

Name a sci-fi classic that doesn’t feature some sort of levitation or tractor beam tech...not much, is there.

But the stalwart of Star Trek, Star Wars and Back to the Future is moving beyond fiction and into the real world.

The real-world application of such technology, however, has been limited by the size of the object you can you can control.

Until now that is, and you can learn all at our next Register Lecture.

Engineers at the University of Bristol recently demonstrated it's possible to trap objects largest than the wavelength of a sound wave using an acoustic tractor beam.

collect
0
Ronald Mitchell 2017-10-09
img

Food that levitate into your mouth could help make technology like virtual reality more multisensory.

Whether it’s floating clocks or hovering smartphone chargers, levitation is hot right now.

That’s why we’re totally hyped at the prospect of some fascinating research coming out of the Sussex Computer Human interaction (SCHI) Lab at the U.K.’s University of Sussex, where engineers have figured out how to make a levitating food-delivery system, in which tasty grub floats straight into your mouth.

“We are interested in a way to deliver small quantities of food to a user without anyone touching the food,” Sriram Subramanian, professor of Informatics at the University of Sussex, told Digital Trends.

“We created a way to deliver food from a dropper to the user’s mouth without touching anything.

Food morsels are levitated using acoustic levitation techniques, and transported using our device to the user’s mouth.

collect
0
William Franklin 2019-03-05
img

"Much of the universe is made up of particles assembling," said Heinrich Jaeger, the Sewell Avery Distinguished Service Professor of Physics, who co-authored a new study that appears in Nature Physics.

"With acoustic levitation, we have a beautiful model system to study assembly at scales visible to the human eye, where we can track each particle with precision, and then relate the results to a wide range of often much more microscopic phenomena."

Jaeger's lab conducts innovative studies of the laws governing the interactions of particles--which they've used to create a robotic gripper to pick up almost any object and to explain a long-standing physics mystery that lets you run across the surface of a pool filled with water and corn starch.

In this case, the team was interested in the shape of prototypical clusters that form when, starting from a single particle, more are added one by one.

However, when there are at least six particles, there are a number of different shapes they could assemble into when brought together tightly.

By using high-speed cameras to track the levitated particles, the researchers were able to capture these various configurations.

collect
0
Scott Morell 2016-08-15
img

There are few things cooler than the way in which scientists are able to get objects to levitate above the ground.

But while many of the recent levitating technologies we ve seen involve electromagnets, a new demonstration carried out by researchers at the University of São Paulo in Brazil and Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland, relies on a different method.

What researchers Marco Andrade, Julio Adamowski, and Anne Bernassau have come up with is a means to levitate a 2-inch solid polystyrene sphere using ultrasonic acoustic waves pitched above the frequency a human can hear.

The acoustic levitation of small objects is well known among researchers, and it can be achieved by producing an acoustic standing wave between a sound emitter and a reflector, Andrade told Digital Trends.

If we insert an object much smaller than the wavelength in the acoustic field, there is a phenomenon, called acoustic radiation force, that attracts the small object to a pressure node of the standing wave.

Therefore, a small object can be levitated at a pressure node of the standing wave.

collect
0
Joe Richards 2019-10-25
img

A new study from the lab of Thomas Mallouk shows how microscale "rockets," powered by acoustic waves and an onboard bubble motor, can be driven through 3D landscapes of cells and particles using magnets.

The origin story of the tiny rockets began with a fundamental scientific question: Could scientists design nano- and microscale vessels that use chemicals for fuel to travel through the human body?

Fifteen years of research by Mallouk and others showed that the short answer was "yes," but researchers faced significant barriers for using these vessels in biomedical applications because the chemicals they used for fuel, like hydrogen peroxide, were toxic.

An "accidental" discovery led Mallouk and his group to focus on the use of a completely different type of fuel: sound waves.

While trying to move their rockets with acoustic levitation, a process used to lift particles off a microscope slide with high-frequency sound waves, the group was surprised to find that ultrasound made the robots move at very fast speeds.

Mallouk and his team decided to investigate this phenomenon further to see if they could use high-frequency sound waves to power their tiny vessels.

collect
0
Vivian Matthews 2016-05-21
img

It may not be even remotely close to what The Doctor uses, but a team at the University of Bristol has created a sonic screwdriver that utilises the powers of acoustic levitation to move objects.

The screwdriver, along with what they re calling a Gauntlet of Levitation, were created as a way to help humans control acoustic levitation in order to interact with dangerous materials.

The presented prototypes still have limited forces but symbolise a milestone in our expectations of future technology, the researchers stated in an abstract posted on the Bristol Interaction Group s website.

As shown in the video, smaller pieces can be rotated, which can be helpful in medical procedures or experiments involving dangerous materials.

Single-beam levitation could manipulate particles inside our body for applications in targeted drug delivery or acoustically controlled micro-machines that do not interfere with magnetic resonance imaging, the study stated.

So we re not exactly close yet, but maybe we will be in a few thousand years.

Walter Winkel 2016-09-22
img

We re all familiar with holograms, the projected 3D images created by manipulating light.

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute in Germany used tiny silicone beads assemble into patterns on the surface of water, holding that shape for as long as the sound persisted.

Only we don t generate an image using light, Fischer said.

Playback isn't supported on this device.

Fischer and his colleagues made pretty water rings in the shape of dove, levitated a water drop, and propelled little paper boats across the surface.

They did it using acoustic levitation, a technique often used to study bubbles and foams, among other applications, suspending them in mid-air to keep gravity from causing them to coarsen.

Vivian Matthews 2016-09-22
img

We re all familiar with holograms by now, the projected 3D images created by manipulating light.

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute in Germany used tiny silicone beads assemble into patterns on the surface of water, holding that shape for as long as the sound persisted.

Only we don t generate an image using light, Fischer said.

Fischer and his colleagues made pretty water rings in the shape of dove, levitated a water drop, and propelled little paper boats across the surface.

They did it using acoustic levitation, a technique often used to study bubbles and foams, among other applications, suspending them in mid-air to keep gravity from causing them to coarsen.

Image: P. Fischer et al./Nature

Dion Esparza 2017-08-15
img

Levitation techniques are no longer confined to the laboratory thanks to University of Bristol engineers who have developed an easier way for suspending matter in mid-air by developing a 3D-printed acoustic levitator.

This new technique, published in Review of Scientific Instruments, could be applied to a range of applications, including blood tests.

Anyone who has felt their chest vibrating with the energy of the soundwaves at a festival is already familiar with the principle behind acoustic levitation.

By using ultrasound - a high-pitched sound above human hearing - it is possible to use powerful vibrations without causing any harm to humans.

Magnetic levitation uses magnetic fields to suspend objects in mid-air.

Using parking sensors, a motor driver, an Arduino (a single board microcontroller) and a 3D-printed part, the University of Bristol team has developed an instruction pack for those wanting to assemble their own levitator at home or school.

Theodore Davis 2018-05-01
img

Bristol boffin joins The Register to talk acoustic levitation

Name a sci-fi classic that doesn’t feature some sort of levitation or tractor beam tech...not much, is there.

But the stalwart of Star Trek, Star Wars and Back to the Future is moving beyond fiction and into the real world.

The real-world application of such technology, however, has been limited by the size of the object you can you can control.

Until now that is, and you can learn all at our next Register Lecture.

Engineers at the University of Bristol recently demonstrated it's possible to trap objects largest than the wavelength of a sound wave using an acoustic tractor beam.

William Franklin 2019-03-05
img

"Much of the universe is made up of particles assembling," said Heinrich Jaeger, the Sewell Avery Distinguished Service Professor of Physics, who co-authored a new study that appears in Nature Physics.

"With acoustic levitation, we have a beautiful model system to study assembly at scales visible to the human eye, where we can track each particle with precision, and then relate the results to a wide range of often much more microscopic phenomena."

Jaeger's lab conducts innovative studies of the laws governing the interactions of particles--which they've used to create a robotic gripper to pick up almost any object and to explain a long-standing physics mystery that lets you run across the surface of a pool filled with water and corn starch.

In this case, the team was interested in the shape of prototypical clusters that form when, starting from a single particle, more are added one by one.

However, when there are at least six particles, there are a number of different shapes they could assemble into when brought together tightly.

By using high-speed cameras to track the levitated particles, the researchers were able to capture these various configurations.

Joe Richards 2019-10-25
img

A new study from the lab of Thomas Mallouk shows how microscale "rockets," powered by acoustic waves and an onboard bubble motor, can be driven through 3D landscapes of cells and particles using magnets.

The origin story of the tiny rockets began with a fundamental scientific question: Could scientists design nano- and microscale vessels that use chemicals for fuel to travel through the human body?

Fifteen years of research by Mallouk and others showed that the short answer was "yes," but researchers faced significant barriers for using these vessels in biomedical applications because the chemicals they used for fuel, like hydrogen peroxide, were toxic.

An "accidental" discovery led Mallouk and his group to focus on the use of a completely different type of fuel: sound waves.

While trying to move their rockets with acoustic levitation, a process used to lift particles off a microscope slide with high-frequency sound waves, the group was surprised to find that ultrasound made the robots move at very fast speeds.

Mallouk and his team decided to investigate this phenomenon further to see if they could use high-frequency sound waves to power their tiny vessels.

Blaine Pilgrim 2016-05-21
img

GIF

It may not be even remotely close to what The Doctor uses on Doctor Who, but a team at the University of Bristol in England has created a sonic screwdriver that utilizes the powers of acoustic levitation to move objects.

The screwdriver, along with what they re calling a Gauntlet of Levitation, were created as a way to help humans control acoustic levitation in order to interact with dangerous materials.

The presented prototypes still have limited forces but symbolize a milestone in our expectations of future technology, the researchers stated in an abstract posted on the Bristol Interaction Group s website.

As shown in the video, smaller pieces can be rotated, which can be helpful in medical procedures or experiments involving dangerous materials.

Single-beam levitation could manipulate particles inside our body for applications in targeted drug delivery or acoustically controlled micro-machines that do not interfere with magnetic resonance imaging, the study stated.

So we re not exactly close yet, but maybe we will be in a few thousand years.

Malcolm Vanderveen 2016-08-15
img

Sound has remarkable effects on the human mind.

It can delight us, scare us, depress us and uplift us.

But now, for the first time, physicists have shown that it can uplift physical objects too - in this case, a five centimetre polystyrene ball - using a principle called 'acoustic levitation'.

A team of researchers used three ultrasound transducers - which convert electric current into ultrasonic waves - to create a acoustic levitation device capable of hovering the ball in mid-air, about 7mm away from external surfaces.

Similar devices have previously levitated much smaller objects, but this is the first time that the technique has been used something something so large.

The team, split between the University of São Paulo in Brazil and Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, accomplished the feat by creating a standing wave between the transducers and the ball.

Robert Holloway 2018-05-15
img

Reg Lecture explores tractor beam tech...

The benefits of tractor beam technology are well known - out-running delinquents on your hoverboard, hurling enemies around at a distance, and of course, capturing fleeing rebel spacecraft.

While the principles of the technology are reasonably understood, to date boffins have struggled to move anything substantial.

Engineers at the University of Bristol recently demonstrated it’s possible to trap objects largest than the wavelength of a sound wave using an acoustic tractor beam.

They employed a rotating sound field using 40kHz ultrasonic waves – a pitch usually employed by bats - to suspend a 2cm polystyrene ball.

Join Dr Asier Marzo, one of those behind this breakthrough, on Wednesday 23 May as he explains to Reg readers the working principles of acoustic levitation and its applications and challenges.

Rosalie Lee 2018-04-06
img

WASHINGTON, D.C., April 6, 2018 -- Science promises to sound more exciting than ever at this year's Acoustical Society of America meeting.

Presenters will reveal the latest in acoustics research with insight into topics like how new materials could control acoustic waves, improving audio in virtual reality, acoustic levitation, and how certain insects use acoustics to attract a mate, as well as much more.

The meeting will be held May 7-11, 2018, at the Hyatt Regency in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Over 900 abstracts were submitted for the meeting dealing with sound and its applications in physics, engineering, medicine, linguistics, psychology, ecology and more.

Journalists may also remotely access meeting information with ASA's World Wide Press Room, which will go live once the meeting begins, and host the latest press releases as well as approximately 40 lay language articles about work to be presented.

Live media webcasts featuring a selection of newsworthy research will take place during the meeting.

Ronald Mitchell 2017-10-09
img

Food that levitate into your mouth could help make technology like virtual reality more multisensory.

Whether it’s floating clocks or hovering smartphone chargers, levitation is hot right now.

That’s why we’re totally hyped at the prospect of some fascinating research coming out of the Sussex Computer Human interaction (SCHI) Lab at the U.K.’s University of Sussex, where engineers have figured out how to make a levitating food-delivery system, in which tasty grub floats straight into your mouth.

“We are interested in a way to deliver small quantities of food to a user without anyone touching the food,” Sriram Subramanian, professor of Informatics at the University of Sussex, told Digital Trends.

“We created a way to deliver food from a dropper to the user’s mouth without touching anything.

Food morsels are levitated using acoustic levitation techniques, and transported using our device to the user’s mouth.

Scott Morell 2016-08-15
img

There are few things cooler than the way in which scientists are able to get objects to levitate above the ground.

But while many of the recent levitating technologies we ve seen involve electromagnets, a new demonstration carried out by researchers at the University of São Paulo in Brazil and Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland, relies on a different method.

What researchers Marco Andrade, Julio Adamowski, and Anne Bernassau have come up with is a means to levitate a 2-inch solid polystyrene sphere using ultrasonic acoustic waves pitched above the frequency a human can hear.

The acoustic levitation of small objects is well known among researchers, and it can be achieved by producing an acoustic standing wave between a sound emitter and a reflector, Andrade told Digital Trends.

If we insert an object much smaller than the wavelength in the acoustic field, there is a phenomenon, called acoustic radiation force, that attracts the small object to a pressure node of the standing wave.

Therefore, a small object can be levitated at a pressure node of the standing wave.