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umar mustafa 2021-11-09
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This defensive countershading permits them to stow away from hunters like panther seals and orcas while they swim.

While penguins can't fly, their firm flippers, webbed feet, and smooth shape make them master swimmers.

Indeed, they burn through a large portion of their lives in the sea and do essentially all of their chasing after krill, squid, and crabs submerged.

Polar Penguinstore can travel significant distances rapidly by "sledding," or sliding across the ice on their guts and pushing forward with their feet.

In case it's particularly cool, they group together in enormous states that shield them from hunters and give warmth.

Business fishing in the Southern Sea is additionally a critical worry, as it has decreased fish supply by about half in the Antarctic Landmass.

collect
0
Isiah Jone 2020-08-26
img
Huge fractures in the Antarctic ice shelves could see more than half of the precarious structures shear away, new research has warned, the latest potential consequence of untempered climate change. While melting Arctic and Antarctic ice have long been a known issue with rising temperatures, the possibility of even more dramatic changes in the glaciers adds a new element of … Continue reading
collect
0
Joseph Cormier 2021-03-20
img
German researchers have uncovered marine life along the Antarctic seafloor for the first time in decades after a massive iceberg calved from the Antarctic Ice Sheet last month. 
collect
0
Seth Logan 2017-12-01
img

Nasa's Operation IceBridge successfully kicked off its 2017 survey of Antarctic sea and land ice in October.

For the first time in its long run, the mission that charts polar ice, will launch two different Antarctic flights from two continents — South America and Antarctica.

The space agency released a number of pictures of the icy terrain it collected through its air-borne project.

The images detail the stunning beauty of the Antarctic ice shelves as well as the devastation caused by melting ice.

"This is an exciting and ambitious undertaking for IceBridge, as the dual campaigns will allow us to continue our surveys of important areas near the Antarctic Peninsula and greatly expand our coverage into the vast expanse of East Antarctica," said Nathan Kurtz, IceBridge's project scientist at Goddard Space Flight Center.

One of the most alarming images that was taken this year shows the Larcen C ice shelf breaking off and drifting to sea.

collect
0
Sandra Wilson 2021-02-15
img
Drilling down half a mile beneath the Antarctic ice and discovering mysterious signs of life sounds like the setup to a horror film. Instead, it’s the latest finding from the British Antarctic Survey, which is reporting the first time stationary animals have been identified in the deeply inhospitable frozen environment. The general consensus is that, as you go further down, … Continue reading
collect
0
Eric Vela 2019-02-04
img

The Antarctic continent is an icy and desolate place today, but millions of years ago it was very different.

During the age of the dinosaurs, the continent had a warm environment that had forests, rivers, and all manner of flora and fauna living there.

A newly discovered dinosaur relative was one of the creatures that roamed the Antarctic some 250 million years ago.

The official name for the creature, which was roughly the size of an iguana, is “Antarctanax shackletoni” with the first part of the name being greek for “Antarctic King.” The iguana-like creature was an archosaur, which is an early relative of crocodiles and dinosaurs.

This specimen is particularly important to scientists not only because it is a new dinosaur relative, but because it also helps scientists to understand how archosaurs and crocodile descendants repopulated the world after the mass extinction.

The fossil of the Antarctic king was found in rocks preserved in Antartica that date from just after the Earth’s largest mass extinction says researcher Brandon Peecock.

collect
0
John Bloodsaw 2019-06-11
img

But it isn’t just human eyes spotting new features in Earth’s frozen wastes; many of these remote landforms are discovered and detailed via satellite.

University of Leeds glaciologist Anna Hogg thought so, which is why she requested that seven ice streams on the Antarctica Peninsula be named after the Earth-observing satellites that have helped her document them.

On Friday, her university and the European Space Agency announced that the names had been formally approved by the UK Antarctic Place-names Committee.

The names are expected to be internationally recognised, in what could be the start of a new trend for Antarctic glaciers.

“This is the first Earth-observation [satellite] range of glaciers,” Hogg said in a phone interview.

Hogg said she first became interested in Antarctic place names following a trip to the icy continent in the austral summer of 2013/2014, when she found a massive book of place names in a library at the British Antarctic Survey’s Rothera research base.

collect
0
Pedro Cote 2020-07-22
img
A new source of methane leaking into the Antarctic ocean has been discovered, with concern about how the greenhouse gas could be driving climate change. Although so-called methane seeps – where the gas bubbles out from an underground reservoir and into the ocean – have been identified in multiple locations around the world, this latest example is the first to … Continue reading
collect
0
Ricky Nesbitt 2016-12-07

The British Antarctic Survey has a problem in the form of an enormous crack in the East Antarctic ice sheet.

Dormant for about 35 years, The Crack began to grow in 2012.

Today, it threatens to cleave off the entire ice shelf supporting the Halley VI research station.

And so, Halley VI is being towed out of harm s way.

If the crack continues to move and the ice breaks off, the station would be on the wrong side of the crack, Athena Dinar, a spokesperson for the British Antarctic Survey, told Gizmodo when asked why the meteorological station is being moved 14 miles 23 kilometres inland.

If The Crack is simply ignored, Halley VI could wind up adrift in the sea.

collect
0
Insights Success 2021-09-22

Health and Nutrition roots back to the age of the Neanderthals.

Have you wondered why our ancestors we so fit and strong?

Aker BioMarine is a company that offers extraordinary Antarctic Krill supplements to nourish human and planetary health.Aker BioMarine is a biotech innovator and Antarctic krill harvesting company owned by Aker ASA, an industrial pioneer since its establishment in 1841.

The company develops krill-based ingredients for nutraceutical, aquaculture, and animal feed applications.The company’s fully transparent value chain stretches from sustainable krill harvesting in pristine Antarctic waters through its Montevideo logistics hub, Houston production plant, and all the way to customers around the world.In the following interview, Matts Johansen, the Chief Executive Officer at Aker BioMarine, shares the company’s journey and a few valuable insights into the nutraceutical industry.Below are the highlights of the interview:Would you please brief our audience about your company, its values, and how the company has been positioned as a leading player in the nutrition space?Aker BioMarine is a biotech innovator and Antarctic krill-harvesting company that develops products for nutraceutical, pharmaceutical, aquaculture, and animal feed applications.

As an industry leader for 15 years, we are innovative by nature and are on a mission to improve human and planetary health.

We are the fishermen and women as well as the creators, builders, scientists, and business professionals – together, we are the heartbeat of Aker BioMarine.We believe in a world where all have access to quality nutrition and good health without compromising the future of our planet.

collect
0
Garland Marsella 2018-02-23
img

NASA has completed a study that took massive amounts of satellite data to give a clear picture of how Antarctic ice flow into the ocean has changed.

According to the study, the information gives the clearest picture yet of how ice loss is accelerating in the region.

NASA says that the findings confirm that ice loss is accelerating from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.

NASA used a computer-vision technique that compiled data from thousands of satellite images to give a very precise reading of the changes in ice-sheet motion.

This work is expected to provide a baseline for future measurements of ice change in the Antarctic.

The data can also be used to validate numerical ice sheet models that predict sea levels.

collect
0
Carlos Edelstein 2017-06-13
img

The New Zealand Antarctic Trust has revealed that it has been sitting on (not literally) a painting by Dr Edward Wilson.

The watercolour was discovered in an Antarctic hut and is currently being restored by the Trust.

Usually a watercolour would have faded significantly over this period, but being kept in freezing temperatures and in pitch blackness have preserved it perfectly.

The Trust discovered the painting in September last year, but kept it a secret so the team could get on with restoring the 1,500 items recovered from the site without some sort of media circus.

The Antarctic area is protected, so once all of the huts and other artefacts are restored they must be returned to the site.

Dr Edward Wilson was a British scientist who went with Captain Robert Scott to the South Pole in 1912 on the Terra Nova expedition.

collect
0
Wayne Strickland 2016-10-31

The world s largest marine protected area MPA has been established in Antarctica s Ross Sea.

A 1.55 million km2 area of the Ross Sea will have special protection from human activities such as commercial fishing.

At a meeting in Hobart, Australia, the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources CCAMLR agreed to a joint USA/New Zealand proposal to establish the MPA.

Declaring an area an MPA means that certain activities are limited or prohibited in order to meet specific conservation and habitat protection objectives.

Ross Sea is an important area for marine life: it is home to 38 percent of the world s population Adelie penguins, 30 percent of the world s Antarctic petrels and six percent of the world s Antarctic minke whales.

It is also home to huge numbers of krill, the staple food for whales and seals and whose oil is critical for salmon farming.

collect
0
Ralph Elliot 2017-06-19
img

300,000 square miles is nearly twice the area of California.

It’s difficult to visualise a space that vast, but go ahead and give it a try.

Now, imagine this California plus-sized chunk of land is covered in thousands of feet of ice.

In January 2016, over the course of just a few weeks, a 300,000 square mile chunk of the West Antarctic ice sheet started turning to slush, in one of the largest melt-outs ever recorded.

Troublingly, they think massive melts like this could be a harbinger of the future—but more research is needed before we can be sure.

The West Antarctic ice sheet has been called the “weak underbelly” of the Antarctic continent, and for good reason: its glaciers, which contain enough frozen water to raise global sea levels by at least 10 feet, are shedding mass rapidly as the planet heats up.

collect
0
Porter Johnson 2017-06-13
img

The New Zealand Antarctic Trust has revealed that it has been sitting on (not literally) a painting by Dr Edward Wilson.

The watercolour was discovered in an Antarctic hut and is currently being restored by the Trust.

Usually a watercolour would have faded significantly over this period, but being kept in freezing temperatures and in pitch blackness have preserved it perfectly.

The Trust discovered the painting in September last year, but kept it a secret so the team could get on with restoring the 1,500 items recovered from the site without some sort of media circus.

The Antarctic area is protected, so once all of the huts and other artefacts are restored they must be returned to the site.

Dr Edward Wilson was a British scientist who went with Captain Robert Scott to the South Pole in 1912 on the Terra Nova expedition.

collect
0
Robert Drummond 2019-01-18
img

Scientists have found the bodies of tardigrades, algae, diatoms, and small crustaceans in a body of water buried beneath over a kilometre of Antarctic ice, according to a news report from Nature.

The results come from the Subglacial Antarctic Lakes Scientific Access (SALSA) project, which had previously announced that it would explore the water, called Lake Mercer, with a 60-centimetre-wide drill.

The carcasses originated from either 10,000 or 120,000 years ago during warming periods, after which ice smothered the lake again, according to Nature.

It’s unclear how the life, particularly the land-dwelling, microscopic tardigrade and a certain fungus, got down there.

This was the third time that scientists have explored an Antarctic subglacial lake, and the first time scientists had accessed Lake Mercer, having only explored it with radar before, according to the Nature report.

Researchers discovered the lake over a decade ago.

collect
0
umar mustafa 2021-11-09
img

This defensive countershading permits them to stow away from hunters like panther seals and orcas while they swim.

While penguins can't fly, their firm flippers, webbed feet, and smooth shape make them master swimmers.

Indeed, they burn through a large portion of their lives in the sea and do essentially all of their chasing after krill, squid, and crabs submerged.

Polar Penguinstore can travel significant distances rapidly by "sledding," or sliding across the ice on their guts and pushing forward with their feet.

In case it's particularly cool, they group together in enormous states that shield them from hunters and give warmth.

Business fishing in the Southern Sea is additionally a critical worry, as it has decreased fish supply by about half in the Antarctic Landmass.

Joseph Cormier 2021-03-20
img
German researchers have uncovered marine life along the Antarctic seafloor for the first time in decades after a massive iceberg calved from the Antarctic Ice Sheet last month. 
Sandra Wilson 2021-02-15
img
Drilling down half a mile beneath the Antarctic ice and discovering mysterious signs of life sounds like the setup to a horror film. Instead, it’s the latest finding from the British Antarctic Survey, which is reporting the first time stationary animals have been identified in the deeply inhospitable frozen environment. The general consensus is that, as you go further down, … Continue reading
John Bloodsaw 2019-06-11
img

But it isn’t just human eyes spotting new features in Earth’s frozen wastes; many of these remote landforms are discovered and detailed via satellite.

University of Leeds glaciologist Anna Hogg thought so, which is why she requested that seven ice streams on the Antarctica Peninsula be named after the Earth-observing satellites that have helped her document them.

On Friday, her university and the European Space Agency announced that the names had been formally approved by the UK Antarctic Place-names Committee.

The names are expected to be internationally recognised, in what could be the start of a new trend for Antarctic glaciers.

“This is the first Earth-observation [satellite] range of glaciers,” Hogg said in a phone interview.

Hogg said she first became interested in Antarctic place names following a trip to the icy continent in the austral summer of 2013/2014, when she found a massive book of place names in a library at the British Antarctic Survey’s Rothera research base.

Ricky Nesbitt 2016-12-07

The British Antarctic Survey has a problem in the form of an enormous crack in the East Antarctic ice sheet.

Dormant for about 35 years, The Crack began to grow in 2012.

Today, it threatens to cleave off the entire ice shelf supporting the Halley VI research station.

And so, Halley VI is being towed out of harm s way.

If the crack continues to move and the ice breaks off, the station would be on the wrong side of the crack, Athena Dinar, a spokesperson for the British Antarctic Survey, told Gizmodo when asked why the meteorological station is being moved 14 miles 23 kilometres inland.

If The Crack is simply ignored, Halley VI could wind up adrift in the sea.

Garland Marsella 2018-02-23
img

NASA has completed a study that took massive amounts of satellite data to give a clear picture of how Antarctic ice flow into the ocean has changed.

According to the study, the information gives the clearest picture yet of how ice loss is accelerating in the region.

NASA says that the findings confirm that ice loss is accelerating from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.

NASA used a computer-vision technique that compiled data from thousands of satellite images to give a very precise reading of the changes in ice-sheet motion.

This work is expected to provide a baseline for future measurements of ice change in the Antarctic.

The data can also be used to validate numerical ice sheet models that predict sea levels.

Wayne Strickland 2016-10-31

The world s largest marine protected area MPA has been established in Antarctica s Ross Sea.

A 1.55 million km2 area of the Ross Sea will have special protection from human activities such as commercial fishing.

At a meeting in Hobart, Australia, the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources CCAMLR agreed to a joint USA/New Zealand proposal to establish the MPA.

Declaring an area an MPA means that certain activities are limited or prohibited in order to meet specific conservation and habitat protection objectives.

Ross Sea is an important area for marine life: it is home to 38 percent of the world s population Adelie penguins, 30 percent of the world s Antarctic petrels and six percent of the world s Antarctic minke whales.

It is also home to huge numbers of krill, the staple food for whales and seals and whose oil is critical for salmon farming.

Porter Johnson 2017-06-13
img

The New Zealand Antarctic Trust has revealed that it has been sitting on (not literally) a painting by Dr Edward Wilson.

The watercolour was discovered in an Antarctic hut and is currently being restored by the Trust.

Usually a watercolour would have faded significantly over this period, but being kept in freezing temperatures and in pitch blackness have preserved it perfectly.

The Trust discovered the painting in September last year, but kept it a secret so the team could get on with restoring the 1,500 items recovered from the site without some sort of media circus.

The Antarctic area is protected, so once all of the huts and other artefacts are restored they must be returned to the site.

Dr Edward Wilson was a British scientist who went with Captain Robert Scott to the South Pole in 1912 on the Terra Nova expedition.

Isiah Jone 2020-08-26
img
Huge fractures in the Antarctic ice shelves could see more than half of the precarious structures shear away, new research has warned, the latest potential consequence of untempered climate change. While melting Arctic and Antarctic ice have long been a known issue with rising temperatures, the possibility of even more dramatic changes in the glaciers adds a new element of … Continue reading
Seth Logan 2017-12-01
img

Nasa's Operation IceBridge successfully kicked off its 2017 survey of Antarctic sea and land ice in October.

For the first time in its long run, the mission that charts polar ice, will launch two different Antarctic flights from two continents — South America and Antarctica.

The space agency released a number of pictures of the icy terrain it collected through its air-borne project.

The images detail the stunning beauty of the Antarctic ice shelves as well as the devastation caused by melting ice.

"This is an exciting and ambitious undertaking for IceBridge, as the dual campaigns will allow us to continue our surveys of important areas near the Antarctic Peninsula and greatly expand our coverage into the vast expanse of East Antarctica," said Nathan Kurtz, IceBridge's project scientist at Goddard Space Flight Center.

One of the most alarming images that was taken this year shows the Larcen C ice shelf breaking off and drifting to sea.

Eric Vela 2019-02-04
img

The Antarctic continent is an icy and desolate place today, but millions of years ago it was very different.

During the age of the dinosaurs, the continent had a warm environment that had forests, rivers, and all manner of flora and fauna living there.

A newly discovered dinosaur relative was one of the creatures that roamed the Antarctic some 250 million years ago.

The official name for the creature, which was roughly the size of an iguana, is “Antarctanax shackletoni” with the first part of the name being greek for “Antarctic King.” The iguana-like creature was an archosaur, which is an early relative of crocodiles and dinosaurs.

This specimen is particularly important to scientists not only because it is a new dinosaur relative, but because it also helps scientists to understand how archosaurs and crocodile descendants repopulated the world after the mass extinction.

The fossil of the Antarctic king was found in rocks preserved in Antartica that date from just after the Earth’s largest mass extinction says researcher Brandon Peecock.

Pedro Cote 2020-07-22
img
A new source of methane leaking into the Antarctic ocean has been discovered, with concern about how the greenhouse gas could be driving climate change. Although so-called methane seeps – where the gas bubbles out from an underground reservoir and into the ocean – have been identified in multiple locations around the world, this latest example is the first to … Continue reading
Insights Success 2021-09-22

Health and Nutrition roots back to the age of the Neanderthals.

Have you wondered why our ancestors we so fit and strong?

Aker BioMarine is a company that offers extraordinary Antarctic Krill supplements to nourish human and planetary health.Aker BioMarine is a biotech innovator and Antarctic krill harvesting company owned by Aker ASA, an industrial pioneer since its establishment in 1841.

The company develops krill-based ingredients for nutraceutical, aquaculture, and animal feed applications.The company’s fully transparent value chain stretches from sustainable krill harvesting in pristine Antarctic waters through its Montevideo logistics hub, Houston production plant, and all the way to customers around the world.In the following interview, Matts Johansen, the Chief Executive Officer at Aker BioMarine, shares the company’s journey and a few valuable insights into the nutraceutical industry.Below are the highlights of the interview:Would you please brief our audience about your company, its values, and how the company has been positioned as a leading player in the nutrition space?Aker BioMarine is a biotech innovator and Antarctic krill-harvesting company that develops products for nutraceutical, pharmaceutical, aquaculture, and animal feed applications.

As an industry leader for 15 years, we are innovative by nature and are on a mission to improve human and planetary health.

We are the fishermen and women as well as the creators, builders, scientists, and business professionals – together, we are the heartbeat of Aker BioMarine.We believe in a world where all have access to quality nutrition and good health without compromising the future of our planet.

Carlos Edelstein 2017-06-13
img

The New Zealand Antarctic Trust has revealed that it has been sitting on (not literally) a painting by Dr Edward Wilson.

The watercolour was discovered in an Antarctic hut and is currently being restored by the Trust.

Usually a watercolour would have faded significantly over this period, but being kept in freezing temperatures and in pitch blackness have preserved it perfectly.

The Trust discovered the painting in September last year, but kept it a secret so the team could get on with restoring the 1,500 items recovered from the site without some sort of media circus.

The Antarctic area is protected, so once all of the huts and other artefacts are restored they must be returned to the site.

Dr Edward Wilson was a British scientist who went with Captain Robert Scott to the South Pole in 1912 on the Terra Nova expedition.

Ralph Elliot 2017-06-19
img

300,000 square miles is nearly twice the area of California.

It’s difficult to visualise a space that vast, but go ahead and give it a try.

Now, imagine this California plus-sized chunk of land is covered in thousands of feet of ice.

In January 2016, over the course of just a few weeks, a 300,000 square mile chunk of the West Antarctic ice sheet started turning to slush, in one of the largest melt-outs ever recorded.

Troublingly, they think massive melts like this could be a harbinger of the future—but more research is needed before we can be sure.

The West Antarctic ice sheet has been called the “weak underbelly” of the Antarctic continent, and for good reason: its glaciers, which contain enough frozen water to raise global sea levels by at least 10 feet, are shedding mass rapidly as the planet heats up.

Robert Drummond 2019-01-18
img

Scientists have found the bodies of tardigrades, algae, diatoms, and small crustaceans in a body of water buried beneath over a kilometre of Antarctic ice, according to a news report from Nature.

The results come from the Subglacial Antarctic Lakes Scientific Access (SALSA) project, which had previously announced that it would explore the water, called Lake Mercer, with a 60-centimetre-wide drill.

The carcasses originated from either 10,000 or 120,000 years ago during warming periods, after which ice smothered the lake again, according to Nature.

It’s unclear how the life, particularly the land-dwelling, microscopic tardigrade and a certain fungus, got down there.

This was the third time that scientists have explored an Antarctic subglacial lake, and the first time scientists had accessed Lake Mercer, having only explored it with radar before, according to the Nature report.

Researchers discovered the lake over a decade ago.