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Swapnil GVR 2021-11-11
img

The global wound irrigation systems market size was valued at USD 283.45 million in 2020 and is expected to expand at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 3.8% from 2021 to 2028.

The demand for wound irrigation systems is on the rise owing to technological advancements, the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, and the rising number of surgical procedures.

Globally, the number of surgeries is increasing owing to which the incidence rate of surgical site infection is also anticipated to rise.

Wound irrigation system allows a steady flow of solutions across the open wound surface, which provides better hydration of deep surgical site and wounds.

The system also allows precise removal of cellular debris and surface pathogens from the wound exudates.

For Right Perspective & Competitive Insights, Request a Sample @: https://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/wound-irrigation-systems-market/request/rs1The global increase in the incidence of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, and other autoimmune diseases, is anticipated to fuel the market growth.

collect
0
Alexander Ruper 2019-05-28
img

Last month I wrote about the unexpected bankruptcy of the small biotech firm Achaogen, which declared Chapter 11 despite having brought out a needed new antibiotic.

It’s remarkable that, in the five weeks since the company put itself up for sale, the alarm provoked by its crash hasn’t died away.

If anything, the concern has gotten more intense.

This sounds unthinkably radical, but a surprising number of leading thinkers about antibiotics are starting to advance the concept, out loud.

At the end of March, Lord Jim O’Neill—the former chief economist of Goldman Sachs, who ran the British government’s two-year Review on Antimicrobial Resistance—startled the audience at a London summit on resistance by recommending that antibiotic R be excised from companies and nationalized.

“Just take it away from them and start over,” he said, excoriating pharma companies for being “endless talk but no progress.”

collect
0
Jonathan Spitzer 2018-07-13
img

Science can’t yet say where it came from or how to control its spread, and hospitals are being forced back into old hygiene practices—putting patients into isolation, swabbing rooms with bleach—to try to control it.

To a medical system that’s been dealing with worsening antibiotic resistance for decades, this chronology feels somewhat familiar: just another, potentially tougher battle to face.

It has developed the ability to survive on cool external skin and cold inorganic surfaces, which allows it to linger on the hands of healthcare workers and on the doorknobs and counters and computer keys of a hospital room.

This novel yeast was already showing some resistance to the first-choice antifungals that would have been used against it, a family of compounds called azoles that can be given by mouth.

The back-up choice, a drug called amphotericin, is IV-only, and also so toxic—its severe fever-and-chills reactions have been dubbed “shake and bake”—that doctors try to avoid it whenever possible.

Still, at that point it had only caused an ear infection.

collect
0
Edward Hickey 2016-05-19
img

Image: Pixabay

An 18-month review into antimicrobial resistance warns that superbugs will kill upwards of 10 million people a year by 2050, a frightening prospect that s being described as the antibiotic apocalypse.

The golden age of antibiotics which the world has taken for granted for well over fifty years has ended.

Indeed, infections that used to be easily treated, such as tuberculosis and gonorrhea, have reemerged a serious health threat.

Individuals receiving organ transplants would have to rely on their own immune systems to prevent their bodies from rejecting donor organs.

O Neill said this issue can no longer be ignored by politicians and the finance sector.

He s hoping that leaders of the world will make it a top priority at the upcoming G20 meeting to be held in China this September.

collect
0
Isiah Jone 2016-05-26
img

Image: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Earlier this month, a frightening report warned of an antibiotic-resistant superbug which might kill as many as 10 million people worldwide by 2050.

According to a study published today by the American Society for Microbiology, a 49-year-old Pennsylvania woman had a strain of E. coli that did not respond to the antibiotic colistin, which is a powerful drug-of-last-resort for treating particularly stubborn infections.

The CDC is investigating the source of the superbug.

There are alternatives to antibiotics, like strains of predatory bacteria that are currently being tested by DARPA, or, surprisingly, more powerful superbugs.

But it s widely agreed among experts that the antibiotic apocalypse is impending.

It basically shows us that the end of the road isn t very far away for antibiotics — that we may be in a situation where we have patients in our intensive-care units, or patients getting urinary tract infections for which we do not have antibiotics, CDC Director Tom Frieden told the Washington Post.

collect
0
William Ly 2016-12-01
img

The 21 September 2016 was a landmark day for the global healthcare community.

193 member states of the United Nations UN simultaneously agreed to sign a declaration to fight antimicrobial resistance.

Antimicrobial resistance is, first and foremost, an evolutionary process that reduces the effectiveness of antibiotics as microbes become resistant to the effects of medication previously used to treat them; it is the expected collateral damage caused by their mere use.

We have, since their discovery by Alexander Fleming in 1928, squandered their use in human and animal medicine, and in recent decades more widely across agriculture and the environment.

The UK government commissioned The Review on Antimicrobial Resistance led by Lord O Neill reports that antimicrobial resistance will be directly responsible for over 10 million deaths by 2050, more than deaths from cancer or deaths from diabetes, road traffic accidents and cholera combined.

The final report by Lord O Neill s group has been instrumental, in one document, in capturing the key global issues and potential solutions to fighting antimicrobial resistance, and placed education of healthcare professionals to become responsible prescribers of antibiotics at the forefront of solutions.

collect
0
jhon tanison 2021-10-14

 Rise in consumption of animal products such as milk and meat, and rising pet culture are among the key factors fueling market growthMarket Size – USD 50.51 Billion in 2020, Market Growth - CAGR of 5.9%, Market Trends – Technological advancements in veterinary diagnosticsThe global animal health market size is expected to reach USD 79.29 Billion by 2028 at a CAGR of 5.9%, according to a new report by Reports and Data.

Growth in market revenue is primarily attributed to increasing consumption of animal-based food products including milk, meat, and fish, growing awareness about the health benefits of animal protein, and rising prevalence of food-borne and zoonotic diseases.

Rising adoption of pet or companion animals such as dogs and cats, development of advanced vaccines and medications for animals, and rise in government initiatives to promote various animal health products are other major factors driving market growth.

Manufacturers in this industry, including biopharmaceutical companies, engage in research & development activities for effective and innovative animal health products and medicines.

Moreover, it reduces the need for antibiotics and minimizes risks of antimicrobial resistance, thereby protecting public and environmental health.Get a sample of the report @ https://www.reportsanddata.com/sample-enquiry-form/1378The rapid adoption of AI, ML, and IoT and robust data management processes has made the hospitals and clinical settings smarter.

Rapid digitalization and increasing adoption of virtual care and telemedicine is further expected to positively impact the revenue growth of the market going ahead.Emergence of new healthcare and telemedicine startups, increasing number of collaborations among healthcare facilities and research institutions, and rising focus on patient engagement solutions has further fueled revenue growth of the market.

collect
0
Evelyn Fowler 2017-01-17
img

Members of this big family morph into deadly CREs when they develop or acquire genes that code for resistance to carbapenems—a group of antibiotics used to treat severe infections that are often already resistant to several other antibiotics.

These carbapenem resistance genes come in several types and are often on mobile pieces of DNA or on shareable loops of DNA called plasmids.

In other words, there s a bunch of them and they can spread around frighteningly easily.

Bacteria can share resistance with their comrades or even to distant relatives; can spread resistance genes to neighboring , for instance.

In the US, those two are the most common CREs.

collect
0
Richard Skaggs 2017-03-07
img

If you regularly make use of an antimicrobial product, it might be worth considering using regular soap or alcohol gels instead.

A new report suggests that the “antimicrobial” ingredients found in everything from soaps to countertops, may not actually help keep us healthy.

In fact, with a lack of consensus on their effectiveness, concerns are growing that these substances may be damaging the environment and helping to create the superbugs which are likely to be one of our biggest future medical challenges.

An antimicrobial is any agent that kills or inhibits the growth of microorganisms like bacteria.

That’s why the federal government considers them a pesticide, though they are more commonly known for their inclusion in hand soaps and in products like door handles and light switches, which manufacturers claim can help prevent the spread of infectious diseases.

However, as the report by Perkins Will and the Healthy Building Network explains (via Fastcodesign), there’s no real evidence to suggest these products actually have much of an effect on improving the health of populations.

collect
0
Marie Haines 2016-05-19
img

A global report says that superbugs will kill people every three seconds by 2050, unless medics change their approach to antibiotics and public awareness about resistance improves.

The Review on Antimicrobial Resistance paints an extremely grim picture of the future, in which superbugs could prove a bigger threat to humans than cancer and basic medical procedures and minor injuries could become deadly.

Doctors have been accused of handing out antibiotics like sweets , with over-prescription leading to increased resistance.

Lord Jim O'Neill led the review, which was commissioned in 2014, and has published a global action plan to help us tackle the threat.

It goes a little something like this:

Reduce the unnecessary use of antimicrobial drugs in healthcare

Improve global awareness of resistance

Pay companies $1 billion £0.7 billion for each new antibiotic discovered

Set up a $2 billion £1.4 billion Global Innovation Fund for research

Reduce the unnecessarily heavy use of antibiotics in farming

Improve surveillance of the spread of drug resistance

Promote the use of vaccines and alternatives to drugs

My review not only makes it clear how big a threat AMR is to the world, with a potential 10 million people dying each year by 2050, but also now sets out a workable blueprint for bold, global action to tackle this challenge, said Lord O Neill, adding, If we don't solve the problem we are heading to the dark ages, we will have a lot of people dying.

Screw it, burger and chips and a side of germs for lunch.

collect
0
Bob Sun 2018-01-09
img

Some people might not think that antibiotic resistance is something to worry about, or perhaps that it won’t be a problem for them or their loved ones.

But what people tend to forget is that taking antibiotics when they do not need them – for minor illnesses, such as an ear infection or a sore throat, which can get better on their own - can put their health at risk of a more severe or longer infection in the future.

In August 2013, I was in the garden when I was bitten by a horse fly.

The bite became badly infected and only 24 hours later, I started developing flu like symptoms, including a high temperature, which continued to worsen.

The infection developed into cellulitis followed by septicaemia.

Three days later I made an appointment with my GP as my hand had swollen and on seeing my arm, immediately called an ambulance and I was rushed to hospital where doctors tried administering four different types of antibiotics to fight the infection but nothing worked.

collect
0
Dwayne Alcorn 2016-05-19
img

A global report says that superbugs will kill people every three seconds by 2050, unless medics change their approach to antibiotics and public awareness about resistance improves.

The Review on Antimicrobial Resistance paints an extremely grim picture of the future, in which superbugs could prove a bigger threat to humans than cancer and basic medical procedures and minor injuries could become deadly.

Doctors have been accused of handing out antibiotics like sweets , with over-prescription leading to increased resistance.

Lord Jim O'Neill led the review, which was commissioned in 2014, and has published a global action plan to help us tackle the threat.

It goes a little something like this:

Reduce the unnecessary use of antimicrobial drugs in healthcare

Improve global awareness of resistance

Pay companies $1 billion £0.7 billion for each new antibiotic discovered

Set up a $2 billion £1.4 billion Global Innovation Fund for research

Reduce the unnecessarily heavy use of antibiotics in farming

Improve surveillance of the spread of drug resistance

Promote the use of vaccines and alternatives to drugs

My review not only makes it clear how big a threat AMR is to the world, with a potential 10 million people dying each year by 2050, but also now sets out a workable blueprint for bold, global action to tackle this challenge, said Lord O Neill, adding, If we don't solve the problem we are heading to the dark ages, we will have a lot of people dying.

Screw it, burger and chips and a side of germs for lunch.

collect
0
Charles Pete 2017-01-13
img

Fifteen years ago, US public health officials declared that infections resistant to antibiotics could become a major threat.

That threat, it seems, has arrived.

Nevada public health officials are reporting that a woman died in September of a so-called superbug infection.

The infection, which had spread throughout her entire system, could fend off 26 different antibiotics.

That number represents every antibiotic that might have cured it in the United States.

It isn t the first time a person in the US has died from a superbug infection.

collect
0
Belinda Miller 2018-07-24
img

But a new outbreak of salmonella bacteria spread by raw turkey that has sickened nearly 100 people across several US states has a troubling wrinkle to it: The germ at fault is likely also resistant to multiple antibiotics.

On Thursday, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that between November and 11 July, at least 90 people from 26 states have been infected with the same strain of Salmonella Reading.

Many of the people interviewed by the CDC reported they had eaten or exposed themselves to turkey products just before becoming sick.

There doesn’t appear to be a single common source for the outbreak.

Both the CDC and the United States Department of Agriculture have reached out to industry representatives and “asked about steps that they may be taking to reduce Salmonella contamination,” the agency said.

Generally, it recommends not feeding your precious pet any raw food at all.

collect
0
William Ewing 2018-07-12
img

Much like climate change, the growing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial superbugs is a ticking time bomb that threatens our very way of life.

It’s also a very expensive problem to tackle, and Big Pharma has struggled to find any promising solutions.

On Wednesday, yet another major pharmaceutical—the Swiss-based Novartis—announced it is dropping out of the antibiotics game.

Novartis, Endpoints News first reported, will shut down its antibacterial and antiviral research programmes and lay off 140 employees at its Emeryville, California, US location.

The cuts are also expected to affect other areas of the company, such as its pharmacology and protein sciences branches.

Most of the laid-off employees will receive two months of severance, while a few will stay on to help shutter the programmes.

collect
0
priyanka 2021-10-08

New York, NY 08 Oct 2021: The global maggot debridement market size is expected to reach USD 19.7 million by 2027 according to a new study by Polaris Market Research.

The report “Maggot debridement Market Share, Size, Trends, Industry Analysis Report, By Administration Type (Biobags, Loose Larva); By End Use (Hospital, Wound Care Centers, Clinics & Others); By Application; By Regions; Segment Forecast, 2020-2027” gives a detailed insight into current market dynamics and provides analysis on future market growth.Maggot debridement therapy is defined as the future technology of the wound debridement process.

Researchers are constantly developing different techniques for safe, quick, and easy wound debridement therapies.

Maggot therapy helps in the treatment of pressure ulcers, neuropathic foot ulcers, non-healing dead skin & soft tissue wounds, venous stasis ulcers, and post-surgical wounds.Request For Sample Copy @ https://www.polarismarketresearch.com/industry-analysis/maggot-debridement-market/request-for-sampleRecent developments in maggot debridement include the usage of sterile maggots in wound debridement therapy (MDT) in South Africa, the U.S., and Europe.

The recent emergence of antimicrobial resistance has updated an interest in maggot debridement therapy utilizing the larvae of lucilia sericata and for this purpose, the Inqaba Biotec and the University of Pretoria have partnered together to expand the commercial production and for the usage of sterile maggots for wound healing in South Africa.

The significant factors favoring the global market growth include the increasing incidents of street mishaps, surgeries, burns, trauma, and road accidents globally that are responsible for the prolonged hospitalization due to the injuries & surgeries which drive the demand for these products.

collect
0
Swapnil GVR 2021-11-11
img

The global wound irrigation systems market size was valued at USD 283.45 million in 2020 and is expected to expand at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 3.8% from 2021 to 2028.

The demand for wound irrigation systems is on the rise owing to technological advancements, the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, and the rising number of surgical procedures.

Globally, the number of surgeries is increasing owing to which the incidence rate of surgical site infection is also anticipated to rise.

Wound irrigation system allows a steady flow of solutions across the open wound surface, which provides better hydration of deep surgical site and wounds.

The system also allows precise removal of cellular debris and surface pathogens from the wound exudates.

For Right Perspective & Competitive Insights, Request a Sample @: https://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/wound-irrigation-systems-market/request/rs1The global increase in the incidence of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, and other autoimmune diseases, is anticipated to fuel the market growth.

Jonathan Spitzer 2018-07-13
img

Science can’t yet say where it came from or how to control its spread, and hospitals are being forced back into old hygiene practices—putting patients into isolation, swabbing rooms with bleach—to try to control it.

To a medical system that’s been dealing with worsening antibiotic resistance for decades, this chronology feels somewhat familiar: just another, potentially tougher battle to face.

It has developed the ability to survive on cool external skin and cold inorganic surfaces, which allows it to linger on the hands of healthcare workers and on the doorknobs and counters and computer keys of a hospital room.

This novel yeast was already showing some resistance to the first-choice antifungals that would have been used against it, a family of compounds called azoles that can be given by mouth.

The back-up choice, a drug called amphotericin, is IV-only, and also so toxic—its severe fever-and-chills reactions have been dubbed “shake and bake”—that doctors try to avoid it whenever possible.

Still, at that point it had only caused an ear infection.

Isiah Jone 2016-05-26
img

Image: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Earlier this month, a frightening report warned of an antibiotic-resistant superbug which might kill as many as 10 million people worldwide by 2050.

According to a study published today by the American Society for Microbiology, a 49-year-old Pennsylvania woman had a strain of E. coli that did not respond to the antibiotic colistin, which is a powerful drug-of-last-resort for treating particularly stubborn infections.

The CDC is investigating the source of the superbug.

There are alternatives to antibiotics, like strains of predatory bacteria that are currently being tested by DARPA, or, surprisingly, more powerful superbugs.

But it s widely agreed among experts that the antibiotic apocalypse is impending.

It basically shows us that the end of the road isn t very far away for antibiotics — that we may be in a situation where we have patients in our intensive-care units, or patients getting urinary tract infections for which we do not have antibiotics, CDC Director Tom Frieden told the Washington Post.

jhon tanison 2021-10-14

 Rise in consumption of animal products such as milk and meat, and rising pet culture are among the key factors fueling market growthMarket Size – USD 50.51 Billion in 2020, Market Growth - CAGR of 5.9%, Market Trends – Technological advancements in veterinary diagnosticsThe global animal health market size is expected to reach USD 79.29 Billion by 2028 at a CAGR of 5.9%, according to a new report by Reports and Data.

Growth in market revenue is primarily attributed to increasing consumption of animal-based food products including milk, meat, and fish, growing awareness about the health benefits of animal protein, and rising prevalence of food-borne and zoonotic diseases.

Rising adoption of pet or companion animals such as dogs and cats, development of advanced vaccines and medications for animals, and rise in government initiatives to promote various animal health products are other major factors driving market growth.

Manufacturers in this industry, including biopharmaceutical companies, engage in research & development activities for effective and innovative animal health products and medicines.

Moreover, it reduces the need for antibiotics and minimizes risks of antimicrobial resistance, thereby protecting public and environmental health.Get a sample of the report @ https://www.reportsanddata.com/sample-enquiry-form/1378The rapid adoption of AI, ML, and IoT and robust data management processes has made the hospitals and clinical settings smarter.

Rapid digitalization and increasing adoption of virtual care and telemedicine is further expected to positively impact the revenue growth of the market going ahead.Emergence of new healthcare and telemedicine startups, increasing number of collaborations among healthcare facilities and research institutions, and rising focus on patient engagement solutions has further fueled revenue growth of the market.

Richard Skaggs 2017-03-07
img

If you regularly make use of an antimicrobial product, it might be worth considering using regular soap or alcohol gels instead.

A new report suggests that the “antimicrobial” ingredients found in everything from soaps to countertops, may not actually help keep us healthy.

In fact, with a lack of consensus on their effectiveness, concerns are growing that these substances may be damaging the environment and helping to create the superbugs which are likely to be one of our biggest future medical challenges.

An antimicrobial is any agent that kills or inhibits the growth of microorganisms like bacteria.

That’s why the federal government considers them a pesticide, though they are more commonly known for their inclusion in hand soaps and in products like door handles and light switches, which manufacturers claim can help prevent the spread of infectious diseases.

However, as the report by Perkins Will and the Healthy Building Network explains (via Fastcodesign), there’s no real evidence to suggest these products actually have much of an effect on improving the health of populations.

Bob Sun 2018-01-09
img

Some people might not think that antibiotic resistance is something to worry about, or perhaps that it won’t be a problem for them or their loved ones.

But what people tend to forget is that taking antibiotics when they do not need them – for minor illnesses, such as an ear infection or a sore throat, which can get better on their own - can put their health at risk of a more severe or longer infection in the future.

In August 2013, I was in the garden when I was bitten by a horse fly.

The bite became badly infected and only 24 hours later, I started developing flu like symptoms, including a high temperature, which continued to worsen.

The infection developed into cellulitis followed by septicaemia.

Three days later I made an appointment with my GP as my hand had swollen and on seeing my arm, immediately called an ambulance and I was rushed to hospital where doctors tried administering four different types of antibiotics to fight the infection but nothing worked.

Charles Pete 2017-01-13
img

Fifteen years ago, US public health officials declared that infections resistant to antibiotics could become a major threat.

That threat, it seems, has arrived.

Nevada public health officials are reporting that a woman died in September of a so-called superbug infection.

The infection, which had spread throughout her entire system, could fend off 26 different antibiotics.

That number represents every antibiotic that might have cured it in the United States.

It isn t the first time a person in the US has died from a superbug infection.

William Ewing 2018-07-12
img

Much like climate change, the growing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial superbugs is a ticking time bomb that threatens our very way of life.

It’s also a very expensive problem to tackle, and Big Pharma has struggled to find any promising solutions.

On Wednesday, yet another major pharmaceutical—the Swiss-based Novartis—announced it is dropping out of the antibiotics game.

Novartis, Endpoints News first reported, will shut down its antibacterial and antiviral research programmes and lay off 140 employees at its Emeryville, California, US location.

The cuts are also expected to affect other areas of the company, such as its pharmacology and protein sciences branches.

Most of the laid-off employees will receive two months of severance, while a few will stay on to help shutter the programmes.

Alexander Ruper 2019-05-28
img

Last month I wrote about the unexpected bankruptcy of the small biotech firm Achaogen, which declared Chapter 11 despite having brought out a needed new antibiotic.

It’s remarkable that, in the five weeks since the company put itself up for sale, the alarm provoked by its crash hasn’t died away.

If anything, the concern has gotten more intense.

This sounds unthinkably radical, but a surprising number of leading thinkers about antibiotics are starting to advance the concept, out loud.

At the end of March, Lord Jim O’Neill—the former chief economist of Goldman Sachs, who ran the British government’s two-year Review on Antimicrobial Resistance—startled the audience at a London summit on resistance by recommending that antibiotic R be excised from companies and nationalized.

“Just take it away from them and start over,” he said, excoriating pharma companies for being “endless talk but no progress.”

Edward Hickey 2016-05-19
img

Image: Pixabay

An 18-month review into antimicrobial resistance warns that superbugs will kill upwards of 10 million people a year by 2050, a frightening prospect that s being described as the antibiotic apocalypse.

The golden age of antibiotics which the world has taken for granted for well over fifty years has ended.

Indeed, infections that used to be easily treated, such as tuberculosis and gonorrhea, have reemerged a serious health threat.

Individuals receiving organ transplants would have to rely on their own immune systems to prevent their bodies from rejecting donor organs.

O Neill said this issue can no longer be ignored by politicians and the finance sector.

He s hoping that leaders of the world will make it a top priority at the upcoming G20 meeting to be held in China this September.

William Ly 2016-12-01
img

The 21 September 2016 was a landmark day for the global healthcare community.

193 member states of the United Nations UN simultaneously agreed to sign a declaration to fight antimicrobial resistance.

Antimicrobial resistance is, first and foremost, an evolutionary process that reduces the effectiveness of antibiotics as microbes become resistant to the effects of medication previously used to treat them; it is the expected collateral damage caused by their mere use.

We have, since their discovery by Alexander Fleming in 1928, squandered their use in human and animal medicine, and in recent decades more widely across agriculture and the environment.

The UK government commissioned The Review on Antimicrobial Resistance led by Lord O Neill reports that antimicrobial resistance will be directly responsible for over 10 million deaths by 2050, more than deaths from cancer or deaths from diabetes, road traffic accidents and cholera combined.

The final report by Lord O Neill s group has been instrumental, in one document, in capturing the key global issues and potential solutions to fighting antimicrobial resistance, and placed education of healthcare professionals to become responsible prescribers of antibiotics at the forefront of solutions.

Evelyn Fowler 2017-01-17
img

Members of this big family morph into deadly CREs when they develop or acquire genes that code for resistance to carbapenems—a group of antibiotics used to treat severe infections that are often already resistant to several other antibiotics.

These carbapenem resistance genes come in several types and are often on mobile pieces of DNA or on shareable loops of DNA called plasmids.

In other words, there s a bunch of them and they can spread around frighteningly easily.

Bacteria can share resistance with their comrades or even to distant relatives; can spread resistance genes to neighboring , for instance.

In the US, those two are the most common CREs.

Marie Haines 2016-05-19
img

A global report says that superbugs will kill people every three seconds by 2050, unless medics change their approach to antibiotics and public awareness about resistance improves.

The Review on Antimicrobial Resistance paints an extremely grim picture of the future, in which superbugs could prove a bigger threat to humans than cancer and basic medical procedures and minor injuries could become deadly.

Doctors have been accused of handing out antibiotics like sweets , with over-prescription leading to increased resistance.

Lord Jim O'Neill led the review, which was commissioned in 2014, and has published a global action plan to help us tackle the threat.

It goes a little something like this:

Reduce the unnecessary use of antimicrobial drugs in healthcare

Improve global awareness of resistance

Pay companies $1 billion £0.7 billion for each new antibiotic discovered

Set up a $2 billion £1.4 billion Global Innovation Fund for research

Reduce the unnecessarily heavy use of antibiotics in farming

Improve surveillance of the spread of drug resistance

Promote the use of vaccines and alternatives to drugs

My review not only makes it clear how big a threat AMR is to the world, with a potential 10 million people dying each year by 2050, but also now sets out a workable blueprint for bold, global action to tackle this challenge, said Lord O Neill, adding, If we don't solve the problem we are heading to the dark ages, we will have a lot of people dying.

Screw it, burger and chips and a side of germs for lunch.

Dwayne Alcorn 2016-05-19
img

A global report says that superbugs will kill people every three seconds by 2050, unless medics change their approach to antibiotics and public awareness about resistance improves.

The Review on Antimicrobial Resistance paints an extremely grim picture of the future, in which superbugs could prove a bigger threat to humans than cancer and basic medical procedures and minor injuries could become deadly.

Doctors have been accused of handing out antibiotics like sweets , with over-prescription leading to increased resistance.

Lord Jim O'Neill led the review, which was commissioned in 2014, and has published a global action plan to help us tackle the threat.

It goes a little something like this:

Reduce the unnecessary use of antimicrobial drugs in healthcare

Improve global awareness of resistance

Pay companies $1 billion £0.7 billion for each new antibiotic discovered

Set up a $2 billion £1.4 billion Global Innovation Fund for research

Reduce the unnecessarily heavy use of antibiotics in farming

Improve surveillance of the spread of drug resistance

Promote the use of vaccines and alternatives to drugs

My review not only makes it clear how big a threat AMR is to the world, with a potential 10 million people dying each year by 2050, but also now sets out a workable blueprint for bold, global action to tackle this challenge, said Lord O Neill, adding, If we don't solve the problem we are heading to the dark ages, we will have a lot of people dying.

Screw it, burger and chips and a side of germs for lunch.

Belinda Miller 2018-07-24
img

But a new outbreak of salmonella bacteria spread by raw turkey that has sickened nearly 100 people across several US states has a troubling wrinkle to it: The germ at fault is likely also resistant to multiple antibiotics.

On Thursday, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that between November and 11 July, at least 90 people from 26 states have been infected with the same strain of Salmonella Reading.

Many of the people interviewed by the CDC reported they had eaten or exposed themselves to turkey products just before becoming sick.

There doesn’t appear to be a single common source for the outbreak.

Both the CDC and the United States Department of Agriculture have reached out to industry representatives and “asked about steps that they may be taking to reduce Salmonella contamination,” the agency said.

Generally, it recommends not feeding your precious pet any raw food at all.

priyanka 2021-10-08

New York, NY 08 Oct 2021: The global maggot debridement market size is expected to reach USD 19.7 million by 2027 according to a new study by Polaris Market Research.

The report “Maggot debridement Market Share, Size, Trends, Industry Analysis Report, By Administration Type (Biobags, Loose Larva); By End Use (Hospital, Wound Care Centers, Clinics & Others); By Application; By Regions; Segment Forecast, 2020-2027” gives a detailed insight into current market dynamics and provides analysis on future market growth.Maggot debridement therapy is defined as the future technology of the wound debridement process.

Researchers are constantly developing different techniques for safe, quick, and easy wound debridement therapies.

Maggot therapy helps in the treatment of pressure ulcers, neuropathic foot ulcers, non-healing dead skin & soft tissue wounds, venous stasis ulcers, and post-surgical wounds.Request For Sample Copy @ https://www.polarismarketresearch.com/industry-analysis/maggot-debridement-market/request-for-sampleRecent developments in maggot debridement include the usage of sterile maggots in wound debridement therapy (MDT) in South Africa, the U.S., and Europe.

The recent emergence of antimicrobial resistance has updated an interest in maggot debridement therapy utilizing the larvae of lucilia sericata and for this purpose, the Inqaba Biotec and the University of Pretoria have partnered together to expand the commercial production and for the usage of sterile maggots for wound healing in South Africa.

The significant factors favoring the global market growth include the increasing incidents of street mishaps, surgeries, burns, trauma, and road accidents globally that are responsible for the prolonged hospitalization due to the injuries & surgeries which drive the demand for these products.