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Jerrod Fenton 2020-07-15
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The field of robotics is one that’s made some significant strides in recent years, but one major difference between us and our robotic counterparts is our ability to feel. Simply having the dexterity to carry out a task isn’t always enough, as our sense of touch gives the brain a lot of contextual information. Today, researchers with the National University … Continue reading
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Debra Simonds 2020-08-04
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According to Reuters, a scene from The Empire Strikes Back inspired the lead researcher at the National University of Singapore to create an electronic skin that can feel.
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Mark Alexander 2019-03-18
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A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have taken inspiration from underwater invertebrates like jellyfish to create an electronic skin with similar functionality.

Just like a jellyfish, the electronic skin is transparent, stretchable, touch-sensitive, and self-healing in aquatic environments, and could be used in everything from water-resistant touchscreens to aquatic soft robots.

Assistant Professor Benjamin Tee and his team from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the NUS Faculty of Engineering developed the material, along with collaborators from Tsinghua University and the University of California Riverside.

Transparent and waterproof self-healing materials for wide-ranging applications

Asst Prof Tee has been working on electronic skins for many years and was part of the team that developed the first ever self-healing electronic skin sensors in 2012.

His experience in this research area led him to identify key obstacles that self-healing electronic skins have yet to overcome.

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Oliver Dyer 2019-03-19
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The jellyfish -- a transparent, gelatinous blob that fills the world's oceans -- doesn't inherently seem like much of an inspirational creature.

They've been inspired by the humble, transparent invertebrates to build their latest creation: a self-healing, stretchable, touch-sensitive electronic skin that could be used to develop soft robots and various human-machine communication interfaces.

"We wondered how we could make an artificial material that could mimic the water-resistant nature of jellyfishes and yet also be touch sensitive," said Benjamin Tee, lead researcher on the study, in a press release.

The details of Tee's new creation were published in Nature Electronics on March 15.

The "gel-like, aquatic, stretchable, self-healing electronic skin" is being dubbed GLASSES, for short.

By mixing an elastic plastic with a fluorine-rich ionic liquid into a gel, Tee and his research team created a transparent skin that is able to "self-heal" and operate in wet environments, something that previous gels -- such as hydrogels used in tissue engineering -- were not able to do.

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Michael Wadsworth 2020-07-29
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We take our sense of touch for granted. Simple tasks like opening a jar or tying our shoelaces would be a whole lot more complex if we couldn’t feel the object with our hands. Robots typically struggle to replicate this sense, restricting their ability to manipulate objects. But researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) might have found a solution: pairing artificial skin with a neuromorphic “brain.”  The system was developed by a team led by Assistant Professors Benjamin Tee, an electronic skin expert, and Harold Soh, an AI specialist. Together, the duo has created a robotic perception system that combines touch and sight.…

This story continues at The Next Web
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Bob Sun 2020-07-15
(National University of Singapore) The novel system developed by National University Singapore computer scientists and materials engineers combines an artificial brain system with human-like electronic skin, and vision sensors, to make robots smarter.
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Efrain Johnson 2021-05-14
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Your weekly selection of awesome robot videos
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John Bloodsaw 2019-07-18
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Robots and prosthetic devices may soon have a sense of touch equivalent to, or better than, the human skin with the Asynchronous Coded Electronic Skin (ACES), an artificial nervous system developed by a team of researchers at the National University of Singapore (NUS).

The new electronic skin system achieved ultra-high responsiveness and robustness to damage, and can be paired with any kind of sensor skin layers to function effectively as an electronic skin.

Faster than the human sensory nervous system

"Humans use our sense of touch to accomplish almost every daily task, such as picking up a cup of coffee or making a handshake.

Without it, we will even lose our sense of balance when walking.

Similarly, robots need to have a sense of touch in order to interact better with humans, but robots today still cannot feel objects very well," explained Asst Prof Tee, who has been working on electronic skin technologies for over a decade in hope of giving robots and prosthetic devices a better sense of touch.

collect
0
Jerrod Fenton 2020-07-15
img
The field of robotics is one that’s made some significant strides in recent years, but one major difference between us and our robotic counterparts is our ability to feel. Simply having the dexterity to carry out a task isn’t always enough, as our sense of touch gives the brain a lot of contextual information. Today, researchers with the National University … Continue reading
Mark Alexander 2019-03-18
img

A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have taken inspiration from underwater invertebrates like jellyfish to create an electronic skin with similar functionality.

Just like a jellyfish, the electronic skin is transparent, stretchable, touch-sensitive, and self-healing in aquatic environments, and could be used in everything from water-resistant touchscreens to aquatic soft robots.

Assistant Professor Benjamin Tee and his team from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the NUS Faculty of Engineering developed the material, along with collaborators from Tsinghua University and the University of California Riverside.

Transparent and waterproof self-healing materials for wide-ranging applications

Asst Prof Tee has been working on electronic skins for many years and was part of the team that developed the first ever self-healing electronic skin sensors in 2012.

His experience in this research area led him to identify key obstacles that self-healing electronic skins have yet to overcome.

Michael Wadsworth 2020-07-29
img

We take our sense of touch for granted. Simple tasks like opening a jar or tying our shoelaces would be a whole lot more complex if we couldn’t feel the object with our hands. Robots typically struggle to replicate this sense, restricting their ability to manipulate objects. But researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) might have found a solution: pairing artificial skin with a neuromorphic “brain.”  The system was developed by a team led by Assistant Professors Benjamin Tee, an electronic skin expert, and Harold Soh, an AI specialist. Together, the duo has created a robotic perception system that combines touch and sight.…

This story continues at The Next Web
Efrain Johnson 2021-05-14
img
Your weekly selection of awesome robot videos
Debra Simonds 2020-08-04
img
According to Reuters, a scene from The Empire Strikes Back inspired the lead researcher at the National University of Singapore to create an electronic skin that can feel.
Oliver Dyer 2019-03-19
img

The jellyfish -- a transparent, gelatinous blob that fills the world's oceans -- doesn't inherently seem like much of an inspirational creature.

They've been inspired by the humble, transparent invertebrates to build their latest creation: a self-healing, stretchable, touch-sensitive electronic skin that could be used to develop soft robots and various human-machine communication interfaces.

"We wondered how we could make an artificial material that could mimic the water-resistant nature of jellyfishes and yet also be touch sensitive," said Benjamin Tee, lead researcher on the study, in a press release.

The details of Tee's new creation were published in Nature Electronics on March 15.

The "gel-like, aquatic, stretchable, self-healing electronic skin" is being dubbed GLASSES, for short.

By mixing an elastic plastic with a fluorine-rich ionic liquid into a gel, Tee and his research team created a transparent skin that is able to "self-heal" and operate in wet environments, something that previous gels -- such as hydrogels used in tissue engineering -- were not able to do.

Bob Sun 2020-07-15
(National University of Singapore) The novel system developed by National University Singapore computer scientists and materials engineers combines an artificial brain system with human-like electronic skin, and vision sensors, to make robots smarter.
John Bloodsaw 2019-07-18
img

Robots and prosthetic devices may soon have a sense of touch equivalent to, or better than, the human skin with the Asynchronous Coded Electronic Skin (ACES), an artificial nervous system developed by a team of researchers at the National University of Singapore (NUS).

The new electronic skin system achieved ultra-high responsiveness and robustness to damage, and can be paired with any kind of sensor skin layers to function effectively as an electronic skin.

Faster than the human sensory nervous system

"Humans use our sense of touch to accomplish almost every daily task, such as picking up a cup of coffee or making a handshake.

Without it, we will even lose our sense of balance when walking.

Similarly, robots need to have a sense of touch in order to interact better with humans, but robots today still cannot feel objects very well," explained Asst Prof Tee, who has been working on electronic skin technologies for over a decade in hope of giving robots and prosthetic devices a better sense of touch.