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Beatrice Patterson 2017-01-16
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Sounds painful: For some people, anesthesia doesn t work.

An employee-free bookstore opened last month in Seoul and hasn t seen a single theft.

Looking for rocks that can make music in Vietnam.

In three southern states, Martin Luther King Day is also Robert E. Lee Day — and Biloxi, Mississippi is getting flak for calling it Great Americans Day.Photo: El Cerrito High School during the Martin Luther King Jr. celebration in El Cerrito, Calif., on Jan. 20, 2014.

Kristopher Skinner/Bay Area News Group

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William Hill 2017-10-08

An anonymous reader writes: The good news: Hurricane Nate was eventually downgraded to "a tropical storm" at 4:30 Sunday morning (EST), moving north-northeast with maximum winds of 70 mph.

The bad news: 100,000 people don't have power in Mississippi and Alabama, and a tornado watch is in effect until 11 a.m. "Even though Nate has made landfall and will weaken today, we are still forecasting heavy rain from Nate to spread well inland towards the Tennessee Valley and Appalachian mountains," ABC News meteorologist Daniel Manzo said Sunday morning.

Saturday the Gulf Coast near Biloxi, Mississippi was hit with 85 mph winds and a storm surge of between four to five feet.

"Gulf Coast residents are waking up to a wet, windy -- and in some cases, powerless -- Sunday morning," reports ABC News, "but it's still not as devastating as they expected."

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Bill Brown 2018-10-10
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Hamilton fans know the lyric: "In the eye of a hurricane, there is quiet/for just a moment."

US Air Force Reserve Pilot Will Simmons experienced that quiet Wednesday morning, and it's just as eerie as in Alexander Hamilton's day.

Simmons was flying a USAF Hurricane Hunter mission out of Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi, and after multiple passes through the eye, finally had enough daylight to see the massive storm.

"Life-threatening effects are imminent along parts of the Florida panhandle," he wrote in a tweet sharing a video of that brief moment in the eye.

Monstrous clouds surround the plane like walls as the crew flies through and records the video.

"I love the job, but at the same time, hate that I had to go out to fly this today," Simmons wrote.

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Eric Vela 2017-10-08
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NASA's Aqua satellite and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite analyzed the temperatures in Hurricane Nate's cloud tops and determined that the most powerful thunderstorms and heaviest rain areas were around the center of the tropical cyclone after it made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River.

At 8 p.m. EDT/7 p.m. CDT on Oct. 7, Hurricane Nate's eye was at the mouth of the Mississippi River.

National Weather Service radar data and surface observations indicated that Hurricane Nate made landfall near Biloxi, Mississippi, around 12:30 a.m. CDT/1:30 a.m. EDT on Oct. 8, with maximum winds of 85 mph (140 kph).

At 2 a.m. EDT/1 a.m. CDT, the eye of Hurricane Nate moved over Keesler Air Force Base where the NOAA Hurricane hunter planes reside.

At that time, Nate had maximum sustained winds near 85 mph (140 kph).

By 6 a.m. EDT/5 a.m. CDT, Nate had weakened to a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds near 70 mph (110 kph).

collect
0
Beatrice Patterson 2017-01-16
img

Sounds painful: For some people, anesthesia doesn t work.

An employee-free bookstore opened last month in Seoul and hasn t seen a single theft.

Looking for rocks that can make music in Vietnam.

In three southern states, Martin Luther King Day is also Robert E. Lee Day — and Biloxi, Mississippi is getting flak for calling it Great Americans Day.Photo: El Cerrito High School during the Martin Luther King Jr. celebration in El Cerrito, Calif., on Jan. 20, 2014.

Kristopher Skinner/Bay Area News Group

Bill Brown 2018-10-10
img

Hamilton fans know the lyric: "In the eye of a hurricane, there is quiet/for just a moment."

US Air Force Reserve Pilot Will Simmons experienced that quiet Wednesday morning, and it's just as eerie as in Alexander Hamilton's day.

Simmons was flying a USAF Hurricane Hunter mission out of Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi, and after multiple passes through the eye, finally had enough daylight to see the massive storm.

"Life-threatening effects are imminent along parts of the Florida panhandle," he wrote in a tweet sharing a video of that brief moment in the eye.

Monstrous clouds surround the plane like walls as the crew flies through and records the video.

"I love the job, but at the same time, hate that I had to go out to fly this today," Simmons wrote.

William Hill 2017-10-08

An anonymous reader writes: The good news: Hurricane Nate was eventually downgraded to "a tropical storm" at 4:30 Sunday morning (EST), moving north-northeast with maximum winds of 70 mph.

The bad news: 100,000 people don't have power in Mississippi and Alabama, and a tornado watch is in effect until 11 a.m. "Even though Nate has made landfall and will weaken today, we are still forecasting heavy rain from Nate to spread well inland towards the Tennessee Valley and Appalachian mountains," ABC News meteorologist Daniel Manzo said Sunday morning.

Saturday the Gulf Coast near Biloxi, Mississippi was hit with 85 mph winds and a storm surge of between four to five feet.

"Gulf Coast residents are waking up to a wet, windy -- and in some cases, powerless -- Sunday morning," reports ABC News, "but it's still not as devastating as they expected."

Eric Vela 2017-10-08
img

NASA's Aqua satellite and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite analyzed the temperatures in Hurricane Nate's cloud tops and determined that the most powerful thunderstorms and heaviest rain areas were around the center of the tropical cyclone after it made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River.

At 8 p.m. EDT/7 p.m. CDT on Oct. 7, Hurricane Nate's eye was at the mouth of the Mississippi River.

National Weather Service radar data and surface observations indicated that Hurricane Nate made landfall near Biloxi, Mississippi, around 12:30 a.m. CDT/1:30 a.m. EDT on Oct. 8, with maximum winds of 85 mph (140 kph).

At 2 a.m. EDT/1 a.m. CDT, the eye of Hurricane Nate moved over Keesler Air Force Base where the NOAA Hurricane hunter planes reside.

At that time, Nate had maximum sustained winds near 85 mph (140 kph).

By 6 a.m. EDT/5 a.m. CDT, Nate had weakened to a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds near 70 mph (110 kph).