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Ruth Johnson 2017-03-20
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Meet the Remarkable Robot That Communicates Like No Other

You can’t have a conversation with your microwave or refrigerator—unless, of course, you’re on acid.

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Jack Scharfenberg 2021-01-21
(Brown University) Brown University researchers have shown that tiny channels between graphene sheets can be aligned in a way that makes them ideal for water filtration.
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Timothy Corn 2021-06-01
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(Brown University) Brown University researchers have developed a technique that could allow deep brain stimulation devices to sense activity in the brain and adjust stimulation accordingly.
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Jason Kowalski 2021-02-05
(Brown University) A team of Brown University researchers developed a technique that uses tiny polymer spheres to sense the forces at play as body tissue forms and grows.
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Beatrice Patterson 2020-10-21
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(Brown University) New research by a team at Brown University finds that special filaments called vimentin may be key to the spread of some aggressive, chemo-resistant cancer cells.
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Mattie Wright 2021-03-15
(Brown University) Brown University computer scientists, working with a U.S. senator, have proposed a gun registry database that's ultra-secure and decentralized, potentially easing concerns about privacy and federal overreach.
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Alexander Ruper 2021-01-22
(Brown University) Brown University researchers have shown a way to make bulk metals by smashing tiny metal nanoparticles together, which allows for customized grain structures and improved mechanical and other properties.
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Ronald Evans 2017-12-06
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According to new research published today in Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Europa has what it takes to support plate tectonics.

"Using computer models, a team lead by Brown University planetary scientist Brandon Johnson was able to demonstrate the physical feasibility of icy plates driving deep into the icy interior

"Using computer models, a team lead by Brown University planetary scientist Brandon Johnson was able to demonstrate the physical feasibility of icy plates driving deep into the icy interior in a processes similar to what's seen on Earth,"

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Sean Biro 2021-01-29
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Researchers from Brown University have developed a system that could keep track of firearms while preserving privacy.
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Brad Patterson 2017-07-10
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It's hoped cutting-edge tech will bridge broken senses

The US military's research nerve center DARPA on Monday awarded contracts to five organizations and one company to develop brain interface technology.

By funding projects at Brown University, Columbia University, Fondation Voir et Entendre (The Seeing and Hearing Foundation), John B Pierce Laboratory, Paradromics, and the University of California, Berkeley, DARPA aims to build knowledge about how brain interfaces work, and to develop technology capable of restoring impaired or lost senses.

The awards are part of DARPA's $60m Neural Engineering System Design (NESD) program announced in January, 2016 to develop a brain interface capable of communicating with up to one million neurons at a time.

"The NESD program looks ahead to a future in which advanced neural devices offer improved fidelity, resolution, and precision sensory interface for therapeutic applications," said Phillip Alvelda, the founding NESD program manager, in a statement.

DARPA's interest in brain interface technology is shared by private sector technology firms, including Elon Musk's Neuralink, Kernel, and ad giant Facebook (following its recruitment of ex-DARPA head Regina Dugan).

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Belinda Miller 2018-01-22
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PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- Storing the immense amounts of data produced in our increasingly digital world is quickly becoming a serious scientific problem.

Such a system could have the potential to store billions of terabytes of data in a single flask of liquid.

The project, dubbed "Chemical CPUs: Computational Processing via Ugi Reactions," will be backed by a $4.1 million award from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Molecular Informatics program.

"Collectively, people produce millions of terabytes of data every day, and it's getting harder and harder to store all that data in small devices," said Brenda Rubenstein, an assistant professor of chemistry at Brown and the project's principal investigator.

They aim to use synthetic molecules, produced in millions of unique combinations, as a means of encoding data, which could be stored in immense quantities in solutions.

The data will then be read back out using a high-performance mass spectrometer capable of identifying the molecular combinations.

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Johnny Huff 2020-12-29
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Ashish Jha, the dean of Brown University School of Public Health, said the issues lie with the federal government, which passed the burden to states.
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JUSTIN MARTIN 2021-01-27
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Let’s understand how they did, what this method means to humanity, etc.About the MethodScientists from Brown University discovered a method to mold the entire metallic structure, even at the granular level.

When tested, one of the fruitful observations was that the newly formed structures were four times harder than naturally occurring metal.How scientists developed the method?Researchers first tried to develop a coin-type structure in a centimeter-scale size.

They did it by using metals like silver (scientific name: Argentum, chemical formula: Ag), gold (scientific name: Aurum, chemical formula: Au), palladium (Pd), and other metals.

So, a major debate among the scientists was to eliminate these ligands present in the metallic nanoparticles, to proceed further.

So, suppose the scientists wanted to use any specific metal for a dedicated purpose, including cutting process, aerospace, defense, etc.

In that case, there is a need to customize these metals to be harder and cannot find breakage in its most challenging moments.Inferences and ObservationsThe Brown University scientists believe that this nano-clustering methodology for metals can help humanity mold the metals according to the purposes, requirements, and applications.

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William Ly 2021-05-19
(Brown University) A new study shows that mathematical topology can reveal how human cells organize into complex spatial patterns, helping to categorize them by the formation of branched and clustered structures.
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Billy Clark 2021-02-11
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(Brown University) An analysis of 133 million tweets found that city-dwellers stay racially segregated as they eat, drink, shop, socialize and travel each day, demonstrating even deeper segregation than previously understood.
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0
Jennifer True 2020-08-13
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(Brown University) By efficiently converting CO2 into complex hydrocarbon products, a new catalyst developed by a team of Brown researchers could potentially aid in large-scale efforts to recycle excess carbon dioxide.
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0
Ruth Johnson 2017-03-20
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To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video

This live video has ended.

It will be available to watch shortly.

See what else is new

Meet the Remarkable Robot That Communicates Like No Other

You can’t have a conversation with your microwave or refrigerator—unless, of course, you’re on acid.

Timothy Corn 2021-06-01
img
(Brown University) Brown University researchers have developed a technique that could allow deep brain stimulation devices to sense activity in the brain and adjust stimulation accordingly.
Beatrice Patterson 2020-10-21
img
(Brown University) New research by a team at Brown University finds that special filaments called vimentin may be key to the spread of some aggressive, chemo-resistant cancer cells.
Alexander Ruper 2021-01-22
(Brown University) Brown University researchers have shown a way to make bulk metals by smashing tiny metal nanoparticles together, which allows for customized grain structures and improved mechanical and other properties.
Sean Biro 2021-01-29
img
Researchers from Brown University have developed a system that could keep track of firearms while preserving privacy.
Belinda Miller 2018-01-22
img

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- Storing the immense amounts of data produced in our increasingly digital world is quickly becoming a serious scientific problem.

Such a system could have the potential to store billions of terabytes of data in a single flask of liquid.

The project, dubbed "Chemical CPUs: Computational Processing via Ugi Reactions," will be backed by a $4.1 million award from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Molecular Informatics program.

"Collectively, people produce millions of terabytes of data every day, and it's getting harder and harder to store all that data in small devices," said Brenda Rubenstein, an assistant professor of chemistry at Brown and the project's principal investigator.

They aim to use synthetic molecules, produced in millions of unique combinations, as a means of encoding data, which could be stored in immense quantities in solutions.

The data will then be read back out using a high-performance mass spectrometer capable of identifying the molecular combinations.

JUSTIN MARTIN 2021-01-27
img

Let’s understand how they did, what this method means to humanity, etc.About the MethodScientists from Brown University discovered a method to mold the entire metallic structure, even at the granular level.

When tested, one of the fruitful observations was that the newly formed structures were four times harder than naturally occurring metal.How scientists developed the method?Researchers first tried to develop a coin-type structure in a centimeter-scale size.

They did it by using metals like silver (scientific name: Argentum, chemical formula: Ag), gold (scientific name: Aurum, chemical formula: Au), palladium (Pd), and other metals.

So, a major debate among the scientists was to eliminate these ligands present in the metallic nanoparticles, to proceed further.

So, suppose the scientists wanted to use any specific metal for a dedicated purpose, including cutting process, aerospace, defense, etc.

In that case, there is a need to customize these metals to be harder and cannot find breakage in its most challenging moments.Inferences and ObservationsThe Brown University scientists believe that this nano-clustering methodology for metals can help humanity mold the metals according to the purposes, requirements, and applications.

Billy Clark 2021-02-11
img
(Brown University) An analysis of 133 million tweets found that city-dwellers stay racially segregated as they eat, drink, shop, socialize and travel each day, demonstrating even deeper segregation than previously understood.
Jack Scharfenberg 2021-01-21
(Brown University) Brown University researchers have shown that tiny channels between graphene sheets can be aligned in a way that makes them ideal for water filtration.
Jason Kowalski 2021-02-05
(Brown University) A team of Brown University researchers developed a technique that uses tiny polymer spheres to sense the forces at play as body tissue forms and grows.
Mattie Wright 2021-03-15
(Brown University) Brown University computer scientists, working with a U.S. senator, have proposed a gun registry database that's ultra-secure and decentralized, potentially easing concerns about privacy and federal overreach.
Ronald Evans 2017-12-06
img

According to new research published today in Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Europa has what it takes to support plate tectonics.

"Using computer models, a team lead by Brown University planetary scientist Brandon Johnson was able to demonstrate the physical feasibility of icy plates driving deep into the icy interior

"Using computer models, a team lead by Brown University planetary scientist Brandon Johnson was able to demonstrate the physical feasibility of icy plates driving deep into the icy interior in a processes similar to what's seen on Earth,"

Brad Patterson 2017-07-10
img

It's hoped cutting-edge tech will bridge broken senses

The US military's research nerve center DARPA on Monday awarded contracts to five organizations and one company to develop brain interface technology.

By funding projects at Brown University, Columbia University, Fondation Voir et Entendre (The Seeing and Hearing Foundation), John B Pierce Laboratory, Paradromics, and the University of California, Berkeley, DARPA aims to build knowledge about how brain interfaces work, and to develop technology capable of restoring impaired or lost senses.

The awards are part of DARPA's $60m Neural Engineering System Design (NESD) program announced in January, 2016 to develop a brain interface capable of communicating with up to one million neurons at a time.

"The NESD program looks ahead to a future in which advanced neural devices offer improved fidelity, resolution, and precision sensory interface for therapeutic applications," said Phillip Alvelda, the founding NESD program manager, in a statement.

DARPA's interest in brain interface technology is shared by private sector technology firms, including Elon Musk's Neuralink, Kernel, and ad giant Facebook (following its recruitment of ex-DARPA head Regina Dugan).

Johnny Huff 2020-12-29
img
Ashish Jha, the dean of Brown University School of Public Health, said the issues lie with the federal government, which passed the burden to states.
William Ly 2021-05-19
(Brown University) A new study shows that mathematical topology can reveal how human cells organize into complex spatial patterns, helping to categorize them by the formation of branched and clustered structures.
Jennifer True 2020-08-13
img
(Brown University) By efficiently converting CO2 into complex hydrocarbon products, a new catalyst developed by a team of Brown researchers could potentially aid in large-scale efforts to recycle excess carbon dioxide.