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Janet Gaines 2018-04-13
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But Cornyn continued, “How about third parties that you have contracted with to use some of that underlying information, perhaps to target advertising for themselves?”

To Zuckerberg, this must have been exasperating.

The whole thing felt to Facebook roughly like watching the father of the bride at a tense wedding, refilled glass of chardonnay in hand, slide up to the microphone to give a toast.

Zuckerberg, a magazine I recently opened came with a floppy disk offering me 30 free hours of something called America On-Line.

Thune may have had the most power over Facebook in the room—he oversees the Senate Commerce Committee, which in turn helps oversee the Federal Trade Commission—and he may also have the best jawbone.

According to one who was watching a TV nearby, “It was like magic.” At another spot in Facebook’s offices where senior executives had gathered, people started laughing and smiling.

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0
Ronald Breau 2019-10-05
img

The Cambridge Analytica whistleblower Christopher Wylie revealed how the firm targeted users on Facebook with political advertising.

Cambridge Analytica targeted users that were "more prone to impulsive anger or conspiratorial thinking than average citizens" by creating Facebook groups, sharing articles, and advertising.

Cambridge Analytica already started exploring what political topics Facebook users were interested in since before the 2016 election.

Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

An excerpt from a book by the Cambridge Analytica whistleblower reveals what the firm did that swayed the 2016 elections.

Christopher Wylie, a former Cambridge Analytica employee, is known for leaking documents to journalists that showed how Cambridge Analytica harvest the data of millions of Facebook users without their consent, using it to inform targeted political advertising.

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0
Ralph Philbrick 2018-02-27
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The daughter of Alphabet chairman Eric Schmidt interned at controversial data company Cambridge Analytica, the company’s CEO confirmed today to the UK's Culture Media and Sport select committee.

MPs at Westminster, London, were turning Cambridge Analytica boss Alexander Nix upside-down today in the hope that evidence of a sinister political conspiracy would fall out of his pockets.

Cambridge Analytica is a young offshoot of an older UK company, Strategic Communications Laboratories, now the SCL Group.

The quant tycoon (and former IBM researcher) Robert Mercer, whose family funded Donald Trump’s Presidential campaign, bought into the operation (investing $5m).

In the US, Cambridge Analytica appointed Steve Bannon to its board.

Over here, in a public statement, Cambridge Analytica claimed to have joined the Leave.EU campaign.

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0
William Hanselman 2019-07-11
img

Netflix dropped the trailer for its Cambridge Analytica documentary on Thursday.

The documentary, titled "The Great Hack," features journalist Carole Cadwalladr who broke the story, as well as Cambridge Analytica whistleblower Brittany Kaiser.

"The Great Hack" comes out on July 24.

Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Netflix just dropped the trailer for an original documentary about Cambridge Analytica.

"The Great Hack" will look into how Cambridge Analytica scraped the data of 87 million Facebook users to target advertising for Donald Trump's 2016 election campaign.

collect
0
Charles Glass 2018-05-03
img

Britain's Information Commissioner's Office and Electoral Commission will continue to pursue Cambridge Analytica, which shut down on Wednesday.

The information commissioner also promised to "closely monitor any successor companies" after Cambridge Analytica executives established a mysterious new data firm.

There are concerns, however, that investigators don't have the tools to interrogate Cambridge Analytica properly, and some want police to step in.

Investigators have warned that they will continue to pursue Cambridge Analytica despite the controversial data firm shutting down on Wednesday.

Britain's Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) said it will keep investigating accusations that Cambridge Analytica scraped data from 87 million Facebook accounts and weaponised it during political campaigns, including the 2016 US election.

The ICO said it would press on even if it means going after the executives individually.

collect
0
Danny Duck 2019-03-17
img

Andreessen Horowitz investor and Facebook board member Marc Andreessen has denied claims he met the Cambridge Analytica whistleblower Chris Wylie in 2016.

The Observer reported that Andreessen hosted a meeting to determine how Cambridge Analytica might be misusing people's data.

If true, the meeting suggests Facebook understood the extent of Cambridge Analytica's data harvesting almost two years before the scandal broke publicly.

A prominent Silicon Valley investor and Facebook board member has denied claims that he met with a Cambridge Analytica representative as early as 2016.

The Observer reported that Marc Andreessen, a founding partner at VC firm Andreessen Horowitz and current Facebook board member, hosted a meeting with former Cambridge Analytica employee Chris Wylie over concerns about the way the political consultancy was manipulating people's data.

The meeting, the newspaper reported, took place at Andreessen Horowitz's offices in 2016, just as Cambridge Analytica began work on Donald Trump's presidential campaign.

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0
Michelle Briggs 2018-04-26
img

Facebook has found "billing and administration connections" between Canadian ad firm AggregateIQ and Cambridge Analytica, despite the two firms denying they have links.

Reports suggested that AggregateIQ may have improperly accessed Facebook data originally harvested by Cambridge Analytica, then used that data to push Brexit-related ads and pages to voters in 2016 — but both firms have denied this.

Facebook also said that, while AggregateIQ had spent $2 million on Brexit-related pages, it probably hadn't used the data harvested by Cambridge Analytica.

Facebook's chief technology officer Mike Schroepfer is being grilled by UK politicians on Thursday morning about the firm's role in the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Facebook has discovered connections between Canadian data firm AggregateIQ and Cambridge Analytica, despite the two firms consistently denying any mutual involvement.

In evidence handed to British politicians on Thursday, Facebook wrote that it found "certain billing and administration connections" between the two firms.

collect
0
William Mcneely 2018-04-10

In his opening statement in today’s Senate hearing with Mark Zuckerberg, Senator Thune (R-SD) noted that Cambridge Analytica, the company most associated with the ongoing privacy debacle, will be examined separately at another time.

“There are plenty of questions about the behavior of Cambridge Analytica and we expect to hold a future hearing on Cambridge and similar firms,” the Senator said.

Thune chairs the Commerce, Science & Transportation Committee, which is one of several that combined for today’s hearing, but he did not indicate whether it would be that or another committee, or another group of them, that will talk to Cambridge Analytica and whichever other companies are deemed to be alike to it.

Shortly afterwards, Sen. Bill Nelson (R-FL) also noted the intention of inviting Cambridge Analytica for a chat.

“Now since we still don’t know what Cambridge Analytica has done with this data, you heard chairman thune say, as we had discussed, we want to haul Cambridge Analytica in to answer these questions at a separate hearing.”

Nelson is on the same committee, so it seems likely that it will be the one to host the proposed hearing, but Nelson did not actually confirm this.

collect
0
Ralph Miller 2018-04-04
img

Facebook said Wednesday that Cambridge Analytica, a data firm with ties to President Donald Trump's campaign, may have had information on about 87 million Facebook users without the users' knowledge.

Facebook had previously said the number of people whose information may have been shared with Cambridge Analytica was only around 50 million.

It announced the revised number in a blog post on Wednesday.

Facebook has said the data was initially collected by a professor for academic purposes in line with its rules.

The information was later transferred to third parties, including Cambridge Analytica, in violation of Facebook's policies.

Starting next week, Facebook will tell people if their information was shared with Cambridge Analytica.

collect
0
James Kiley 2018-03-19
img

After acknowledging that Trump campaign-linked data firm Cambridge Analytica mishandled the data of 50 million users, Facebook says it has hired a digital forensics team to investigate the company.

On Friday, ahead of investigative reports detailing the scheme, Facebook said it had banned the company and its parent organization from the platform after it was revealed that a professor, using a seemingly innocuous app to draw in users, passed the resulting data to Cambridge Analytica, in violation of Facebook’s policies.

In its announcement, Facebook said it had received reports that, contrary to claims from Cambridge Analytica, the data had not been destroyed.

The ensuing outrage directed toward both Facebook and Cambridge Analytica, which ran data operations for the Trump campaign, has been swift and widespread.

Today, in a follow-up note, Facebook says it has hired the firm Stroz Friedberg to conduct the audit.

According to Facebook, Cambridge Analytica is cooperating and offering access to their servers.

collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2018-05-01

Twitter says it doesn't want Cambridge Analytica's money, and has banned the research company from buying ads on its platform.

CA, which was at the heart of the Facebook data scandal, received a ticking off for its business model, which "inherently conflicts with acceptable Twitter Ads business practices".

"Twitter has made the policy decision to off-board advertising from all accounts owned and operated by Cambridge Analytica," Twitter said in a statement to Bloomberg Technology.

"This decision is based on our determination that Cambridge Analytica operates using a business model that inherently conflicts with acceptable Twitter Ads business practices.

Cambridge Analytica may remain an organic user on our platform, in accordance with the Twitter Rules."

Six degrees of Cambridge Analytica

collect
0
Ronald Breau 2018-03-20
img

Cambridge Analytica, the data analytics firm that worked on Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, has agreed to a forensic audit to determine whether the firm improperly retained data scraped from Facebook profiles.

Facebook announced the audit in a statement, calling it a “comprehensive internal and external review” to determine whether Cambridge Analytica had truly deleted the data, as it claimed it had.

Facebook has retained Stroz Friedburg, a digital forensics firm that helped the Democratic National Committee investigate a hack of its servers during the election cycle, to conduct the investigation into Cambridge Analytica.

“Cambridge Analytica has agreed to comply and afford the firm complete access to their servers and systems,” Facebook said.

The company also approached Christopher Wylie and Aleksandr Kogan, who were involved in the data scraping for Cambridge Analytica, and asked them to participate in the audit.

The app gathered data from the Facebook profiles of the people who downloaded it and from their friends’ profiles, ultimately gathering information about more than 50 million users.

collect
0
Jerry Miller 2018-11-21
img

After Facebook received a $644,000 (£500,000) from U.K. watchdog body over its failure to keep data analytics firm Cambridge Analytica from improperly accessing user data, the company today filed a motion to appeal the fine.

The BBC first reported on the news.

Facebook is appealing the fine on the grounds that an investigation from the Information Commissioner’s Office did not find any evidence that Cambridge Analytica improperly utilized the user data when targeting ads in the lead up to the 2016 Brexit referendum.

Facebook initially estimated in March that the personal data from up to 1.1 million U.K citizens could have been accessed by Cambridge Analytica.

That’s when the news broke that Facebook had failed to stop Cambridge Analytica — which claimed to work with the Leave.EU group, then retracted that claim — from getting access to user data obtained through a personality quiz, and not getting their consent to use it for ad targeting.

“The ICO’s investigation stemmed from concerns that UK citizens’ data may have been impacted by Cambridge Analytica, yet they now have confirmed that they have found no evidence to suggest that information of Facebook users in the UK was ever shared by Dr Kogan with Cambridge Analytica, or used by its affiliates in the Brexit referendum,” a statement provided to the BBC from Facebook’s lawyer Anna Benckert read.

collect
0
Adrian Bray 2018-04-10
img

Political research firm Cambridge Analytica may have had access to private Facebook messages between 1,500 users and their friends.

This detail was included in notifications Facebook sent out this week to the 87 million people potentially affected by the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

It was not previously disclosed by Facebook.

However, the researcher who provided the data to Cambridge Analytica, and the firm itself, denied it collected private messages.

This week, Facebook started to notify some 87 million users that Trump-linked data firm Cambridge Analytica may have misappropriated their profile data to target political ads.

"A small number of people who logged into 'This Is Your Digital Life' also shared their own News Feed, timeline, posts and messages which may have included posts and messages from you," the notification reads.

collect
0
Mike Estes 2018-04-10
img

Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal seems unending, but this week, users are finally getting some answers about whether or not their data was shared.

Yesterday, Facebook began surfacing links at the top of News Feeds to help users understand what kind of data they’re sharing with third-party apps.

Today, the company took things one step further and launched a new tool that allows users to see if their information was shared with Cambridge Analytica.

With Cambridge Analytica gaining access to information associated with as many as 84 million accounts, there are likely a lot of Facebook users interested in figuring out if their data was compromised.

Cambridge Analytica collected information on Facebook users primarily through an app called “This Is Your Digital Life,” which caught on with millions of users before it was removed in 2015.

The tricky thing about This iI Your Digital Life is that Facebook users who logged into it also shared information on their friends, so even if you didn’t log into the app yourself, the possibility of Cambridge Analytica pulling your data still exists.

collect
0
Bruce Garland 2018-04-30
img

Everyone who didn’t sell data to Cambridge Analytica or Aleksandr Kogan please take one step forward.

Twitter, it turns out, also sold data to the former Cambridge Analytica researcher who tricked Facebook users into helping him digitally gerrymander the 2016 US presidential election.

According to The Telegraph, Dr. Aleksandr Kogan, the mind behind the personality quiz that Cambridge Analytica used to glean personal data from more than 80 million people, bought data from Twitter in 2015.

Kogan, of course, denies the Twitter data had anything to do with his work for Cambridge Analytica leading up to the 2016 election.

Kogan’s company, Global Science Research (GSR), was given access to data-sets containing publicly available tweets for an unspecified amount of money.

A Twitter spokesperson told Bloomberg:

collect
0
Janet Gaines 2018-04-13
img

But Cornyn continued, “How about third parties that you have contracted with to use some of that underlying information, perhaps to target advertising for themselves?”

To Zuckerberg, this must have been exasperating.

The whole thing felt to Facebook roughly like watching the father of the bride at a tense wedding, refilled glass of chardonnay in hand, slide up to the microphone to give a toast.

Zuckerberg, a magazine I recently opened came with a floppy disk offering me 30 free hours of something called America On-Line.

Thune may have had the most power over Facebook in the room—he oversees the Senate Commerce Committee, which in turn helps oversee the Federal Trade Commission—and he may also have the best jawbone.

According to one who was watching a TV nearby, “It was like magic.” At another spot in Facebook’s offices where senior executives had gathered, people started laughing and smiling.

Ralph Philbrick 2018-02-27
img

The daughter of Alphabet chairman Eric Schmidt interned at controversial data company Cambridge Analytica, the company’s CEO confirmed today to the UK's Culture Media and Sport select committee.

MPs at Westminster, London, were turning Cambridge Analytica boss Alexander Nix upside-down today in the hope that evidence of a sinister political conspiracy would fall out of his pockets.

Cambridge Analytica is a young offshoot of an older UK company, Strategic Communications Laboratories, now the SCL Group.

The quant tycoon (and former IBM researcher) Robert Mercer, whose family funded Donald Trump’s Presidential campaign, bought into the operation (investing $5m).

In the US, Cambridge Analytica appointed Steve Bannon to its board.

Over here, in a public statement, Cambridge Analytica claimed to have joined the Leave.EU campaign.

Charles Glass 2018-05-03
img

Britain's Information Commissioner's Office and Electoral Commission will continue to pursue Cambridge Analytica, which shut down on Wednesday.

The information commissioner also promised to "closely monitor any successor companies" after Cambridge Analytica executives established a mysterious new data firm.

There are concerns, however, that investigators don't have the tools to interrogate Cambridge Analytica properly, and some want police to step in.

Investigators have warned that they will continue to pursue Cambridge Analytica despite the controversial data firm shutting down on Wednesday.

Britain's Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) said it will keep investigating accusations that Cambridge Analytica scraped data from 87 million Facebook accounts and weaponised it during political campaigns, including the 2016 US election.

The ICO said it would press on even if it means going after the executives individually.

Michelle Briggs 2018-04-26
img

Facebook has found "billing and administration connections" between Canadian ad firm AggregateIQ and Cambridge Analytica, despite the two firms denying they have links.

Reports suggested that AggregateIQ may have improperly accessed Facebook data originally harvested by Cambridge Analytica, then used that data to push Brexit-related ads and pages to voters in 2016 — but both firms have denied this.

Facebook also said that, while AggregateIQ had spent $2 million on Brexit-related pages, it probably hadn't used the data harvested by Cambridge Analytica.

Facebook's chief technology officer Mike Schroepfer is being grilled by UK politicians on Thursday morning about the firm's role in the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Facebook has discovered connections between Canadian data firm AggregateIQ and Cambridge Analytica, despite the two firms consistently denying any mutual involvement.

In evidence handed to British politicians on Thursday, Facebook wrote that it found "certain billing and administration connections" between the two firms.

Ralph Miller 2018-04-04
img

Facebook said Wednesday that Cambridge Analytica, a data firm with ties to President Donald Trump's campaign, may have had information on about 87 million Facebook users without the users' knowledge.

Facebook had previously said the number of people whose information may have been shared with Cambridge Analytica was only around 50 million.

It announced the revised number in a blog post on Wednesday.

Facebook has said the data was initially collected by a professor for academic purposes in line with its rules.

The information was later transferred to third parties, including Cambridge Analytica, in violation of Facebook's policies.

Starting next week, Facebook will tell people if their information was shared with Cambridge Analytica.

Lamont Shaw 2018-05-01

Twitter says it doesn't want Cambridge Analytica's money, and has banned the research company from buying ads on its platform.

CA, which was at the heart of the Facebook data scandal, received a ticking off for its business model, which "inherently conflicts with acceptable Twitter Ads business practices".

"Twitter has made the policy decision to off-board advertising from all accounts owned and operated by Cambridge Analytica," Twitter said in a statement to Bloomberg Technology.

"This decision is based on our determination that Cambridge Analytica operates using a business model that inherently conflicts with acceptable Twitter Ads business practices.

Cambridge Analytica may remain an organic user on our platform, in accordance with the Twitter Rules."

Six degrees of Cambridge Analytica

Jerry Miller 2018-11-21
img

After Facebook received a $644,000 (£500,000) from U.K. watchdog body over its failure to keep data analytics firm Cambridge Analytica from improperly accessing user data, the company today filed a motion to appeal the fine.

The BBC first reported on the news.

Facebook is appealing the fine on the grounds that an investigation from the Information Commissioner’s Office did not find any evidence that Cambridge Analytica improperly utilized the user data when targeting ads in the lead up to the 2016 Brexit referendum.

Facebook initially estimated in March that the personal data from up to 1.1 million U.K citizens could have been accessed by Cambridge Analytica.

That’s when the news broke that Facebook had failed to stop Cambridge Analytica — which claimed to work with the Leave.EU group, then retracted that claim — from getting access to user data obtained through a personality quiz, and not getting their consent to use it for ad targeting.

“The ICO’s investigation stemmed from concerns that UK citizens’ data may have been impacted by Cambridge Analytica, yet they now have confirmed that they have found no evidence to suggest that information of Facebook users in the UK was ever shared by Dr Kogan with Cambridge Analytica, or used by its affiliates in the Brexit referendum,” a statement provided to the BBC from Facebook’s lawyer Anna Benckert read.

Mike Estes 2018-04-10
img

Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal seems unending, but this week, users are finally getting some answers about whether or not their data was shared.

Yesterday, Facebook began surfacing links at the top of News Feeds to help users understand what kind of data they’re sharing with third-party apps.

Today, the company took things one step further and launched a new tool that allows users to see if their information was shared with Cambridge Analytica.

With Cambridge Analytica gaining access to information associated with as many as 84 million accounts, there are likely a lot of Facebook users interested in figuring out if their data was compromised.

Cambridge Analytica collected information on Facebook users primarily through an app called “This Is Your Digital Life,” which caught on with millions of users before it was removed in 2015.

The tricky thing about This iI Your Digital Life is that Facebook users who logged into it also shared information on their friends, so even if you didn’t log into the app yourself, the possibility of Cambridge Analytica pulling your data still exists.

Ronald Breau 2019-10-05
img

The Cambridge Analytica whistleblower Christopher Wylie revealed how the firm targeted users on Facebook with political advertising.

Cambridge Analytica targeted users that were "more prone to impulsive anger or conspiratorial thinking than average citizens" by creating Facebook groups, sharing articles, and advertising.

Cambridge Analytica already started exploring what political topics Facebook users were interested in since before the 2016 election.

Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

An excerpt from a book by the Cambridge Analytica whistleblower reveals what the firm did that swayed the 2016 elections.

Christopher Wylie, a former Cambridge Analytica employee, is known for leaking documents to journalists that showed how Cambridge Analytica harvest the data of millions of Facebook users without their consent, using it to inform targeted political advertising.

William Hanselman 2019-07-11
img

Netflix dropped the trailer for its Cambridge Analytica documentary on Thursday.

The documentary, titled "The Great Hack," features journalist Carole Cadwalladr who broke the story, as well as Cambridge Analytica whistleblower Brittany Kaiser.

"The Great Hack" comes out on July 24.

Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Netflix just dropped the trailer for an original documentary about Cambridge Analytica.

"The Great Hack" will look into how Cambridge Analytica scraped the data of 87 million Facebook users to target advertising for Donald Trump's 2016 election campaign.

Danny Duck 2019-03-17
img

Andreessen Horowitz investor and Facebook board member Marc Andreessen has denied claims he met the Cambridge Analytica whistleblower Chris Wylie in 2016.

The Observer reported that Andreessen hosted a meeting to determine how Cambridge Analytica might be misusing people's data.

If true, the meeting suggests Facebook understood the extent of Cambridge Analytica's data harvesting almost two years before the scandal broke publicly.

A prominent Silicon Valley investor and Facebook board member has denied claims that he met with a Cambridge Analytica representative as early as 2016.

The Observer reported that Marc Andreessen, a founding partner at VC firm Andreessen Horowitz and current Facebook board member, hosted a meeting with former Cambridge Analytica employee Chris Wylie over concerns about the way the political consultancy was manipulating people's data.

The meeting, the newspaper reported, took place at Andreessen Horowitz's offices in 2016, just as Cambridge Analytica began work on Donald Trump's presidential campaign.

William Mcneely 2018-04-10

In his opening statement in today’s Senate hearing with Mark Zuckerberg, Senator Thune (R-SD) noted that Cambridge Analytica, the company most associated with the ongoing privacy debacle, will be examined separately at another time.

“There are plenty of questions about the behavior of Cambridge Analytica and we expect to hold a future hearing on Cambridge and similar firms,” the Senator said.

Thune chairs the Commerce, Science & Transportation Committee, which is one of several that combined for today’s hearing, but he did not indicate whether it would be that or another committee, or another group of them, that will talk to Cambridge Analytica and whichever other companies are deemed to be alike to it.

Shortly afterwards, Sen. Bill Nelson (R-FL) also noted the intention of inviting Cambridge Analytica for a chat.

“Now since we still don’t know what Cambridge Analytica has done with this data, you heard chairman thune say, as we had discussed, we want to haul Cambridge Analytica in to answer these questions at a separate hearing.”

Nelson is on the same committee, so it seems likely that it will be the one to host the proposed hearing, but Nelson did not actually confirm this.

James Kiley 2018-03-19
img

After acknowledging that Trump campaign-linked data firm Cambridge Analytica mishandled the data of 50 million users, Facebook says it has hired a digital forensics team to investigate the company.

On Friday, ahead of investigative reports detailing the scheme, Facebook said it had banned the company and its parent organization from the platform after it was revealed that a professor, using a seemingly innocuous app to draw in users, passed the resulting data to Cambridge Analytica, in violation of Facebook’s policies.

In its announcement, Facebook said it had received reports that, contrary to claims from Cambridge Analytica, the data had not been destroyed.

The ensuing outrage directed toward both Facebook and Cambridge Analytica, which ran data operations for the Trump campaign, has been swift and widespread.

Today, in a follow-up note, Facebook says it has hired the firm Stroz Friedberg to conduct the audit.

According to Facebook, Cambridge Analytica is cooperating and offering access to their servers.

Ronald Breau 2018-03-20
img

Cambridge Analytica, the data analytics firm that worked on Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, has agreed to a forensic audit to determine whether the firm improperly retained data scraped from Facebook profiles.

Facebook announced the audit in a statement, calling it a “comprehensive internal and external review” to determine whether Cambridge Analytica had truly deleted the data, as it claimed it had.

Facebook has retained Stroz Friedburg, a digital forensics firm that helped the Democratic National Committee investigate a hack of its servers during the election cycle, to conduct the investigation into Cambridge Analytica.

“Cambridge Analytica has agreed to comply and afford the firm complete access to their servers and systems,” Facebook said.

The company also approached Christopher Wylie and Aleksandr Kogan, who were involved in the data scraping for Cambridge Analytica, and asked them to participate in the audit.

The app gathered data from the Facebook profiles of the people who downloaded it and from their friends’ profiles, ultimately gathering information about more than 50 million users.

Adrian Bray 2018-04-10
img

Political research firm Cambridge Analytica may have had access to private Facebook messages between 1,500 users and their friends.

This detail was included in notifications Facebook sent out this week to the 87 million people potentially affected by the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

It was not previously disclosed by Facebook.

However, the researcher who provided the data to Cambridge Analytica, and the firm itself, denied it collected private messages.

This week, Facebook started to notify some 87 million users that Trump-linked data firm Cambridge Analytica may have misappropriated their profile data to target political ads.

"A small number of people who logged into 'This Is Your Digital Life' also shared their own News Feed, timeline, posts and messages which may have included posts and messages from you," the notification reads.

Bruce Garland 2018-04-30
img

Everyone who didn’t sell data to Cambridge Analytica or Aleksandr Kogan please take one step forward.

Twitter, it turns out, also sold data to the former Cambridge Analytica researcher who tricked Facebook users into helping him digitally gerrymander the 2016 US presidential election.

According to The Telegraph, Dr. Aleksandr Kogan, the mind behind the personality quiz that Cambridge Analytica used to glean personal data from more than 80 million people, bought data from Twitter in 2015.

Kogan, of course, denies the Twitter data had anything to do with his work for Cambridge Analytica leading up to the 2016 election.

Kogan’s company, Global Science Research (GSR), was given access to data-sets containing publicly available tweets for an unspecified amount of money.

A Twitter spokesperson told Bloomberg: