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Troy Schindler 2016-07-15
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Design student Lucie Davis has put London at her fingertips, literally, with her Oyster-activated nails that can be used to touch in and out of the Underground thanks to an ingeniously placed microchip.

The nails were created as part of Davis' BA in BA in jewellery design at UAL's Central Saint Martins and were showcased at the end of year show.

The inspiration for the Oyster nails came as part of a project that challenged the students to find extraordinary ideas from everyday events and Davis immediately thought about her daily commute.

"These ideas just kept popping up as I was experience my daily routine," said Davis.

"You get so immersed in it, it's an intimate, active thing – that's what I want to get across."

luciedavis 3 weeks ago Follow luciedaviscsminnovationtransportforlondoncsm news 352 likes 46 comments Instagram

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John Murphy 2016-07-14
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A London fashion student has invented the world s first Oyster Card nails.

Lucie Davis created the ingenious wearable tech as part of her BA in jewellery design at Central Saint Martins.

Not only is the nail art inspired by the Oyster Card design, you can use the press-on nails instead of your travelcard.

That s because one of the acrylic nails contains a tiny RFID Radio-frequency identification chip linked to your Oyster account.

Talk about having the city at your fingertips.

The idea came about when Davis was asked to create a project inspired by engaging with her daily surroundings, and immediately thought of her morning commute.

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0
Nicolas Yeager 2019-02-22
img

As the lights dimmed and the urgent, teeth-rattling beat kicked in, the throng of people cleared to allow the models to stride down the runway.

Perched just in front of me on a narrow white bench, a row of celebrities, including former Spider-man Andrew Garfield and Game of Thrones actor Natalie Dormer, ceased their small talk and pulled the Magic Leap headsets down over their eyes.

They, along with a room of London's fashion elite, were about to see one of fashion week's most highly anticipated shows -- the latest collection from emerging designers out of the UK's top fashion school, Central Saint Martins.

This is where fashion editors go to try to spot the stars of the future.

But one of the designers was offering up a collection with a difference.

The playful clothes crafted by designer Gerrit Jacobs were accompanied by a mixed-reality show that floated above the models as they took to the catwalk.

collect
0
Richard Bond 2019-08-12
img

More unregulated creepycams blight London

Britons working for Google at its London HQ are being secretly spied on by creepy facial recognition cameras – but these ones aren't operated by the ad-tech company.

"The 67-acre King's Cross area, which has been recently redeveloped and houses several office buildings including Google's UK headquarters, Central Saint Martins college, schools and a range of retailers, has multiple cameras set up to surveil visitors," reported the Pink 'Un.

King's Cross is no longer just a London railway terminus and notoriously seedy neighbourhood.

The area around the station, once infamous for the types of activities featured in Irvine Welsh novels, has been extensively redeveloped – with tenants now including Google (and YouTube), various other trendy offices, eateries and so on, to the point where it apparently has its own unique postcode.

The Register has contacted the King's Cross developers' PR tentacle separately and will update this article if their promised response to our detailed questions is forthcoming.

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0
James Lamb 2019-08-16
img

The Information Commissioners Office (ICO) is to investigate why a private company that manages the King’s Cross area of London is using facial recognition to track individuals.

The ICO said it remains “deeply concerned” at the use of the technology, and said that it will investigate “inspect the system and its operation on-site” to ensure it complies with data protection laws.

It comes after growing concern when it was revealed earlier the week that the 67-acre King’s Cross area, which is developed and managed by the King’s Cross Central Limited Partnership (KCCLP) and Argent, is using the tech for unknown purposes.

The area is the site of Google’s UK headquarters and other businesses, Central Saint Martins college, schools and retailers.

The ICO said its investigation was down to concerns about the use of the tech, as reported in the media.

“We have launched an investigation following concerns reported in the media regarding the use of live facial recognition in the King’s Cross area of central London, which thousands of people pass through every day,” explained Elizabeth Denham, Information Commissioner.

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0
Julian Dunkelberger 2019-08-16
img

ICO wants to know if AI surveillance systems in central London are legal

The UK's privacy watchdog last night launched a probe into the use of facial-recognition technology in the busy King's Cross corner of central London.

King's Cross includes Google's UK HQ, Central Saint Martins college, shops and schools, as well as the bustling eponymous railway station.

"I remain deeply concerned about the growing use of facial recognition technology in public spaces, not only by law enforcement agencies but also increasingly by the private sector," said Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham in a statement on Thursday.

"We have launched an investigation following concerns reported in the media regarding the use of live facial recognition in the King's Cross area of central London, which thousands of people pass through every day."

The commissioner added her watchdog will look into whether the AI systems in use at King's Cross are on the right side of Blighty's data protection rules, and whether the law as a whole has kept up with the pace of change in surveillance technology.

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Danny Duck 2019-08-12
img

The private company that manages the King’s Cross area of London is using face recognition to track individuals and Canary Wharf is considering adding such capabilities, in spite of controversy around the technology.

The 67-acre King’s Cross area, which is developed and managed by the King’s Cross Central Limited Partnership, is the site of Google’s UK headquarters and other businesses, Central Saint Martins college, schools and retailers.

An unnamed spokesperson for the King’s Cross group told the Financial Times there are multiple cameras installed across the area to observe passers-by using technologies including face recognition.

“These cameras use a number of detection and tracking methods, including facial recognition, but also have sophisticated systems in place to protect the privacy of the general public,” the spokesperson said.

The King’s Cross Central Limited Partnership did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The Canary Wharf Group, which owns private offices and public spaces in the area, is also speaking to face recognition suppliers to pilot the technology in the area, the FT said, citing unnamed sources.

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0
Rosalie Lee 2018-09-10
img

Innovate UK is investing £400,000 to launch KQ Labs, an accelerator programme at the Francis Crick Institute to support start-ups working at the interface between biomedical and data science.

The programme will be run by the Crick with Innovate UK funding, taking advantage of the Crick's excellence in biomedical science and collaborations with other scientific institutions.

The programme is called KQ Labs to represent the 'Knowledge Quarter' area around King's Cross, Euston and Bloomsbury.

The Crick sits at the centre of a data science ecosystem including the Alan Turing Institute, Google Deepmind, Benevolent AI, the British Library and others.

Health Data Research UK and Genomics England are collaborating with the accelerator to guide the start-up companies on issues relating to data access.

The sector represents a massive opportunity as technology can help to predict and prevent health issues as well as directing appropriate treatments.

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0
William Lang 2021-09-25

When going out on a bright day, if you don't know which lenses are the best, buying a pair of Eley Kishimoto sunglasses to protect your eyes can get you covered on all fronts.

They guarantee you have the protection you require.To make it easier, EleyKishimoto Sunglasses has outlined all the variables so that you know precisely what to look for when purchasing your next pair.History of the Brand- Eley KishimotoMark Eley earned a BA in fashion and weaving from Brighton Polytechnic in 1990.

WakakoKishimoto earned a BA in fashion and print at Central Saint Martins in 1992.They met while interning in New York in 1989 and launched EleyKishimoto in 1992, producing prints for Alexander McQueen, Hussein Chalayan, Jil Sander, and Marc Jacobs, among others.The duo launched their debut womenswear line in 1996.

The Autumn/Winter 2001 collection was EleyKishimoto's debut on-schedule presentation at London Fashion Week, which took place in February 2001.Wallpaper, furniture and furnishing textiles, glasses, and crockery are just a few of the goods that the firm has produced to exhibit its graphic patterns.

The firm also works in fields that fashion designers often avoid, such as the automobile industry, architecture, phone/computer technology and packaging, as well as artist and gallery partnerships.The popularity of Eley Kishimoto SunglassesEley Kishimoto is a fashion and design company with a global presence.

The company's main line of business is womens wear apparel and accessories.Each new design challenge serves as a platform for the Eley Kishimoto Sunglasses company to reach out to a larger, more diverse audience.The nylon used in Eley Kishimoto Sunglasses is a newer high-performance polymer that combines the benefits of polycarbonate and CR-39 lenses in one package.Eley Kishimoto men’s and women’s sunglasses are available in the collection by Eley Kishimoto UK.

collect
0
Letha Byrd 2019-02-15
img

Three is to use London Fashion Week to convey to consumers the benefits of 5G networks, with permanent installations at St Martins College and at its flagship retail store.

The operator has created the “world’s first” 5G Mixed Reality (MR) catwalk at the renowned fashion school and will let customers see a smaller version in-store from March.

The Oxford Street branch will be able to claim to be the UK’s first 5G-enabled phone shop.

Aside from the virtual catwalk, Three has installed a design-focused 5G lab at the college, allowing students to experiment with cloud technology, IoT-connected devices, and Virtual and Augmented Realities (VR and AR) in the design process.

“Today we are turning up the volume on 5G and bringing it to life for the first time in the UK, right here in the heart of the fashion world,” said Shadi Halliwell, chief marketing officer at Three.

“This is the first glimpse of the future and as we progress our roll-out throughout the next year we will see how it will affect and change everyday life for all our customers.”

collect
0
Shane Higgins 2019-08-14
img

There is growing concern after it emerged that a private company that manages the King’s Cross area of London is using facial recognition to track individuals.

The UK’s biometrics commissioner has said that the government needs to update the laws surrounding the technology, the BBC reported.

It comes after it was revealed earlier the week that the 67-acre King’s Cross area, which is developed and managed by the King’s Cross Central Limited Partnership (KCCLP) and Argent,is using the tech for unknown purposes.

“These cameras use a number of detection and tracking methods, including facial recognition, but also have sophisticated systems in place to protect the privacy of the general public,” a KCCLP spokesperson had told the Financial Times.

But now the BBC reported that developer Argent had confirmed it uses the technology to “ensure public safety”.

But the UK watchdog has described the deployment as “alarming”, and the UK biometrics commissioner Professor Paul Wiles has called for the government to take action over the use of facial recognition technology by the private sector as well as by law enforcement.

collect
0
Gary Meyer 2019-04-11
img

Three UK has confirmed that it is on track to deliver its 5G network in the second half of 2019, and that it has "partnered with Huawei to bring their 5G phone to our customers."

The only 5G Huawei phone that's been launched to date is the impressive, foldable Huawei Mate X, so this could be the first confirmation that the carrier will be stocking the handset later this year.

It won't be cheap though, with Huawei confirming a SIM free price of €2,299 (about £2,000) at the Mate X launch, which will more than likely translate to high up-front and monthly costs on contract.

We have contacted Three UK asking for confirmation of the Mate X being stocked later this year, and we'll update this article once we get a response.

Three has also confirmed that it will sell the HTC 5G Home Hub when its 5G mobile network launches, which will provide the next generation connectivity to your home.

Also, it now has two live 5G test beds in London, one on Oxford Street and the other in Central St Martins, as it continues to test its new network ahead of launch.

collect
0
John Robidoux 2020-09-14
img
Marina Raphael, a sixth-generation member of the Swarovski family, is branching out — but not straying too far away from her family's business.
collect
0
Porter Johnson 2020-07-15
img

Sabinna Rachimova is a designer who’s ahead of the curve when it comes to communicating with her customers and pioneering new ideas, both in terms of her handcrafted-meets-futuristic approach to fashion, and her experimentation with immersive technologies and sales techniques.

Sabinna Rachimova

The Russian-born, Austrian-raised designer behind the line SABINNA has always been fascinated with creating things with her own hands, and her London-based womenswear label has a strong brand identity centred on storytelling, consciousness, innovating and bringing people together.

The Central Saint Martins grad was taught traditional handcraft techniques from her grandmother years ago, and is passionate about the importance of handicraft in fashion. Handcraft pieces are individualised and made with love,  they have an ability to unite people across communities and generations and offer mental health benefits for the crafter, too.

“Handcraft allows you to reconnect with your thoughts and creativity. It’s a therapeutic session. There was a lot of anxiety in lockdown; people had time and had to calm their nerves, and handcraft is beautiful for that. Plus, there’s a sense of accomplishment - you make something and have a final result right away,” Sabinna tells HuffPost UK in a phone interview.

Not only does handcrafting allow for an opportunity to reconnect with yourself and recalibrate your mental health, it also nurtures sustainability. 

As Sabinna notes: “People have lost touch with how products are made and what’s behind them. If you understand what’s behind them, the more value you can see in clothes.” 

Sabinna is one of three designers participating in a visionary, hyper-immersive virtual fashion show experience on July 29, presented by Verizon’s in-house creative studio, RYOT, along with Charli Cohen and Damara, titled The Fabric of Reality. 
 

While Sabinna’s fashion label is all about the primacy of beautiful handiwork - to connect us with both past and present, to bring individuals together through time and space - the designer is also passionate about how immersive technologies can revolutionise the fashion sphere: ethically, sustainably and creatively. 

Sabinna is known for her creative approach to selling and direct communication with her customers, like shaking up how her clothes are presented. She showcased her fourth season collection using Pictofit AR technology on a Microsoft HoloLens, which allowed customers to try on the garments using AR and to switch outfits with a simple hand gesture.

SABINNA's interactive mixed reality project in 2017, in collaboration with the Fashion Innovation Agency and Reactive Reality's Pictofit app

She’s also well versed in how fashion brands can interact and communicate with consumers directly. In pre-pandemic times, the brand hosted a variety of in-store experiences, inviting customers to participate in hand-crafting workshops and to co-design garments in store.

“When lockdown happened, that part of the business had to be rethought as quickly as possible. I’ve always been keen on digital spaces, and always tried to bring innovation where and how we can, so we moved all our workshops and events to digital spaces, and we looked at what the demand is now,” she says. 

The pandemic provided the initial inspiration for Sabinna’s The Fabric of Reality fashion project, which she collaborated on with VR designer, Vladimir Ilic, who’s just as keen to explore the relationship between tradition and innovation as she is.

The concept for Sabinna’s virtual story world captures that collective feeling we can all now recognise: the breath of relief when you first step out the door after days, weeks or even longer in isolation.

“Instead of entering, why not exit into a virtual world? Going out is something we’ve all missed,” says Sabinna.

In Sabinna’s story world, everything is handcrafted: objects are stitched, hand-crocheted and hand-knit, with a sculptural, transparent, multi-layered garment at the centre. She used the family archive of original embroideries her grandmother created 30 years ago, which feature the woods and landscapes from central Asia where her granny grew up, to recreate the experience of texture in the virtual world. Sound helps to bring the story to life.

“The sound aspect can make or break this experience, too. Through sound, we manage to give people a feeling of comfort, home, connection and understanding that something has a special meaning. It brings an emotional aspect to visitors of the exhibition.”

Sabinna’s story world theme also asks the viewer to co-create as part of the project, to virtually pin flowers on the garment in whatever pattern they like. Unlike virtual fashion shows that have tried to replicate the physical in the digital realm, the idea behind The Fabric of Reality is about introducing viewers to something they would never be able to experience in person.

“The concept is about how to reconnect with yourself while exiting into a post-pandemic world,” says Sabinna. “It’s built on nature and mindfulness and the idea is that you can interact with things, create prints, add to items and have a full 360-degree experience, rather than just being a viewer of something. It will help you remember the experience on a very different level.”

In SABINNA's 2017 collection, guests could directly mix and match the pieces using Pictofit Augmented Reality technology on a Microsoft HoloLens

Inviting the viewer to become a co-creator is about more than enhancing their time in the virtual world - although who isn’t excited about the potential to play designer for an evening? Sabinna feels that the more customers understand what goes into the creativity, design and manufacture of a garment, the more they’ll appreciate how crucial sustainability is to the whole process.

It’s clear the pandemic is already changing how people approach their fashion purchases: they’re buying more for a lifetime rather than a season, and thinking about when they really need a physical product, as well as what makes a product special (and therefore worthy of purchasing). The current crisis has provided an opportunity to shift the focus to what the demand really is, as well as changing our attitudes towards technology - digital means something else now than it did pre-pandemic, and has become something we’ve all become much more comfortable with and conversant in.

“My hope is that after this pandemic fashion will not go back to normal. My hope is that finally this stubborn industry will wake up and create new systems, create new ways to work in a smarter and more inclusive way.

“We can finally bring a new layer to make it more diverse through the digital system. This might not be a popular opinion but there is no going back to Fashion Week the way it used to be - I just don’t see a need for it,” says Sabinna.

For Sabinna, much of the excitement she feels for this project has been bridging the physical and virtual realms, as well as introducing consumers to the possibility of using immersive technologies to help design physical garments. For customers to emerge with their own semi-bespoke creation they can wear in everyday life at the end of this would be the “perfect outcome” in the designer’s mind.

“I get really excited because there are no boundaries and no limits in the virtual world. I don’t have to worry if it fits, if it’s wearable, but I’m excited about how it can be commercially valuable. Fashion is a business, clothes are made to be worn,” she says.

The Fabric Of Reality, presented by RYOT and featuring Sabinna, Damara and Charli Cohen, airs July 29.

collect
0
Troy Schindler 2016-07-15
img

Design student Lucie Davis has put London at her fingertips, literally, with her Oyster-activated nails that can be used to touch in and out of the Underground thanks to an ingeniously placed microchip.

The nails were created as part of Davis' BA in BA in jewellery design at UAL's Central Saint Martins and were showcased at the end of year show.

The inspiration for the Oyster nails came as part of a project that challenged the students to find extraordinary ideas from everyday events and Davis immediately thought about her daily commute.

"These ideas just kept popping up as I was experience my daily routine," said Davis.

"You get so immersed in it, it's an intimate, active thing – that's what I want to get across."

luciedavis 3 weeks ago Follow luciedaviscsminnovationtransportforlondoncsm news 352 likes 46 comments Instagram

Nicolas Yeager 2019-02-22
img

As the lights dimmed and the urgent, teeth-rattling beat kicked in, the throng of people cleared to allow the models to stride down the runway.

Perched just in front of me on a narrow white bench, a row of celebrities, including former Spider-man Andrew Garfield and Game of Thrones actor Natalie Dormer, ceased their small talk and pulled the Magic Leap headsets down over their eyes.

They, along with a room of London's fashion elite, were about to see one of fashion week's most highly anticipated shows -- the latest collection from emerging designers out of the UK's top fashion school, Central Saint Martins.

This is where fashion editors go to try to spot the stars of the future.

But one of the designers was offering up a collection with a difference.

The playful clothes crafted by designer Gerrit Jacobs were accompanied by a mixed-reality show that floated above the models as they took to the catwalk.

James Lamb 2019-08-16
img

The Information Commissioners Office (ICO) is to investigate why a private company that manages the King’s Cross area of London is using facial recognition to track individuals.

The ICO said it remains “deeply concerned” at the use of the technology, and said that it will investigate “inspect the system and its operation on-site” to ensure it complies with data protection laws.

It comes after growing concern when it was revealed earlier the week that the 67-acre King’s Cross area, which is developed and managed by the King’s Cross Central Limited Partnership (KCCLP) and Argent, is using the tech for unknown purposes.

The area is the site of Google’s UK headquarters and other businesses, Central Saint Martins college, schools and retailers.

The ICO said its investigation was down to concerns about the use of the tech, as reported in the media.

“We have launched an investigation following concerns reported in the media regarding the use of live facial recognition in the King’s Cross area of central London, which thousands of people pass through every day,” explained Elizabeth Denham, Information Commissioner.

Danny Duck 2019-08-12
img

The private company that manages the King’s Cross area of London is using face recognition to track individuals and Canary Wharf is considering adding such capabilities, in spite of controversy around the technology.

The 67-acre King’s Cross area, which is developed and managed by the King’s Cross Central Limited Partnership, is the site of Google’s UK headquarters and other businesses, Central Saint Martins college, schools and retailers.

An unnamed spokesperson for the King’s Cross group told the Financial Times there are multiple cameras installed across the area to observe passers-by using technologies including face recognition.

“These cameras use a number of detection and tracking methods, including facial recognition, but also have sophisticated systems in place to protect the privacy of the general public,” the spokesperson said.

The King’s Cross Central Limited Partnership did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The Canary Wharf Group, which owns private offices and public spaces in the area, is also speaking to face recognition suppliers to pilot the technology in the area, the FT said, citing unnamed sources.

William Lang 2021-09-25

When going out on a bright day, if you don't know which lenses are the best, buying a pair of Eley Kishimoto sunglasses to protect your eyes can get you covered on all fronts.

They guarantee you have the protection you require.To make it easier, EleyKishimoto Sunglasses has outlined all the variables so that you know precisely what to look for when purchasing your next pair.History of the Brand- Eley KishimotoMark Eley earned a BA in fashion and weaving from Brighton Polytechnic in 1990.

WakakoKishimoto earned a BA in fashion and print at Central Saint Martins in 1992.They met while interning in New York in 1989 and launched EleyKishimoto in 1992, producing prints for Alexander McQueen, Hussein Chalayan, Jil Sander, and Marc Jacobs, among others.The duo launched their debut womenswear line in 1996.

The Autumn/Winter 2001 collection was EleyKishimoto's debut on-schedule presentation at London Fashion Week, which took place in February 2001.Wallpaper, furniture and furnishing textiles, glasses, and crockery are just a few of the goods that the firm has produced to exhibit its graphic patterns.

The firm also works in fields that fashion designers often avoid, such as the automobile industry, architecture, phone/computer technology and packaging, as well as artist and gallery partnerships.The popularity of Eley Kishimoto SunglassesEley Kishimoto is a fashion and design company with a global presence.

The company's main line of business is womens wear apparel and accessories.Each new design challenge serves as a platform for the Eley Kishimoto Sunglasses company to reach out to a larger, more diverse audience.The nylon used in Eley Kishimoto Sunglasses is a newer high-performance polymer that combines the benefits of polycarbonate and CR-39 lenses in one package.Eley Kishimoto men’s and women’s sunglasses are available in the collection by Eley Kishimoto UK.

Shane Higgins 2019-08-14
img

There is growing concern after it emerged that a private company that manages the King’s Cross area of London is using facial recognition to track individuals.

The UK’s biometrics commissioner has said that the government needs to update the laws surrounding the technology, the BBC reported.

It comes after it was revealed earlier the week that the 67-acre King’s Cross area, which is developed and managed by the King’s Cross Central Limited Partnership (KCCLP) and Argent,is using the tech for unknown purposes.

“These cameras use a number of detection and tracking methods, including facial recognition, but also have sophisticated systems in place to protect the privacy of the general public,” a KCCLP spokesperson had told the Financial Times.

But now the BBC reported that developer Argent had confirmed it uses the technology to “ensure public safety”.

But the UK watchdog has described the deployment as “alarming”, and the UK biometrics commissioner Professor Paul Wiles has called for the government to take action over the use of facial recognition technology by the private sector as well as by law enforcement.

John Robidoux 2020-09-14
img
Marina Raphael, a sixth-generation member of the Swarovski family, is branching out — but not straying too far away from her family's business.
John Murphy 2016-07-14
img

A London fashion student has invented the world s first Oyster Card nails.

Lucie Davis created the ingenious wearable tech as part of her BA in jewellery design at Central Saint Martins.

Not only is the nail art inspired by the Oyster Card design, you can use the press-on nails instead of your travelcard.

That s because one of the acrylic nails contains a tiny RFID Radio-frequency identification chip linked to your Oyster account.

Talk about having the city at your fingertips.

The idea came about when Davis was asked to create a project inspired by engaging with her daily surroundings, and immediately thought of her morning commute.

Richard Bond 2019-08-12
img

More unregulated creepycams blight London

Britons working for Google at its London HQ are being secretly spied on by creepy facial recognition cameras – but these ones aren't operated by the ad-tech company.

"The 67-acre King's Cross area, which has been recently redeveloped and houses several office buildings including Google's UK headquarters, Central Saint Martins college, schools and a range of retailers, has multiple cameras set up to surveil visitors," reported the Pink 'Un.

King's Cross is no longer just a London railway terminus and notoriously seedy neighbourhood.

The area around the station, once infamous for the types of activities featured in Irvine Welsh novels, has been extensively redeveloped – with tenants now including Google (and YouTube), various other trendy offices, eateries and so on, to the point where it apparently has its own unique postcode.

The Register has contacted the King's Cross developers' PR tentacle separately and will update this article if their promised response to our detailed questions is forthcoming.

Julian Dunkelberger 2019-08-16
img

ICO wants to know if AI surveillance systems in central London are legal

The UK's privacy watchdog last night launched a probe into the use of facial-recognition technology in the busy King's Cross corner of central London.

King's Cross includes Google's UK HQ, Central Saint Martins college, shops and schools, as well as the bustling eponymous railway station.

"I remain deeply concerned about the growing use of facial recognition technology in public spaces, not only by law enforcement agencies but also increasingly by the private sector," said Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham in a statement on Thursday.

"We have launched an investigation following concerns reported in the media regarding the use of live facial recognition in the King's Cross area of central London, which thousands of people pass through every day."

The commissioner added her watchdog will look into whether the AI systems in use at King's Cross are on the right side of Blighty's data protection rules, and whether the law as a whole has kept up with the pace of change in surveillance technology.

Rosalie Lee 2018-09-10
img

Innovate UK is investing £400,000 to launch KQ Labs, an accelerator programme at the Francis Crick Institute to support start-ups working at the interface between biomedical and data science.

The programme will be run by the Crick with Innovate UK funding, taking advantage of the Crick's excellence in biomedical science and collaborations with other scientific institutions.

The programme is called KQ Labs to represent the 'Knowledge Quarter' area around King's Cross, Euston and Bloomsbury.

The Crick sits at the centre of a data science ecosystem including the Alan Turing Institute, Google Deepmind, Benevolent AI, the British Library and others.

Health Data Research UK and Genomics England are collaborating with the accelerator to guide the start-up companies on issues relating to data access.

The sector represents a massive opportunity as technology can help to predict and prevent health issues as well as directing appropriate treatments.

Letha Byrd 2019-02-15
img

Three is to use London Fashion Week to convey to consumers the benefits of 5G networks, with permanent installations at St Martins College and at its flagship retail store.

The operator has created the “world’s first” 5G Mixed Reality (MR) catwalk at the renowned fashion school and will let customers see a smaller version in-store from March.

The Oxford Street branch will be able to claim to be the UK’s first 5G-enabled phone shop.

Aside from the virtual catwalk, Three has installed a design-focused 5G lab at the college, allowing students to experiment with cloud technology, IoT-connected devices, and Virtual and Augmented Realities (VR and AR) in the design process.

“Today we are turning up the volume on 5G and bringing it to life for the first time in the UK, right here in the heart of the fashion world,” said Shadi Halliwell, chief marketing officer at Three.

“This is the first glimpse of the future and as we progress our roll-out throughout the next year we will see how it will affect and change everyday life for all our customers.”

Gary Meyer 2019-04-11
img

Three UK has confirmed that it is on track to deliver its 5G network in the second half of 2019, and that it has "partnered with Huawei to bring their 5G phone to our customers."

The only 5G Huawei phone that's been launched to date is the impressive, foldable Huawei Mate X, so this could be the first confirmation that the carrier will be stocking the handset later this year.

It won't be cheap though, with Huawei confirming a SIM free price of €2,299 (about £2,000) at the Mate X launch, which will more than likely translate to high up-front and monthly costs on contract.

We have contacted Three UK asking for confirmation of the Mate X being stocked later this year, and we'll update this article once we get a response.

Three has also confirmed that it will sell the HTC 5G Home Hub when its 5G mobile network launches, which will provide the next generation connectivity to your home.

Also, it now has two live 5G test beds in London, one on Oxford Street and the other in Central St Martins, as it continues to test its new network ahead of launch.

Porter Johnson 2020-07-15
img

Sabinna Rachimova is a designer who’s ahead of the curve when it comes to communicating with her customers and pioneering new ideas, both in terms of her handcrafted-meets-futuristic approach to fashion, and her experimentation with immersive technologies and sales techniques.

Sabinna Rachimova

The Russian-born, Austrian-raised designer behind the line SABINNA has always been fascinated with creating things with her own hands, and her London-based womenswear label has a strong brand identity centred on storytelling, consciousness, innovating and bringing people together.

The Central Saint Martins grad was taught traditional handcraft techniques from her grandmother years ago, and is passionate about the importance of handicraft in fashion. Handcraft pieces are individualised and made with love,  they have an ability to unite people across communities and generations and offer mental health benefits for the crafter, too.

“Handcraft allows you to reconnect with your thoughts and creativity. It’s a therapeutic session. There was a lot of anxiety in lockdown; people had time and had to calm their nerves, and handcraft is beautiful for that. Plus, there’s a sense of accomplishment - you make something and have a final result right away,” Sabinna tells HuffPost UK in a phone interview.

Not only does handcrafting allow for an opportunity to reconnect with yourself and recalibrate your mental health, it also nurtures sustainability. 

As Sabinna notes: “People have lost touch with how products are made and what’s behind them. If you understand what’s behind them, the more value you can see in clothes.” 

Sabinna is one of three designers participating in a visionary, hyper-immersive virtual fashion show experience on July 29, presented by Verizon’s in-house creative studio, RYOT, along with Charli Cohen and Damara, titled The Fabric of Reality. 
 

While Sabinna’s fashion label is all about the primacy of beautiful handiwork - to connect us with both past and present, to bring individuals together through time and space - the designer is also passionate about how immersive technologies can revolutionise the fashion sphere: ethically, sustainably and creatively. 

Sabinna is known for her creative approach to selling and direct communication with her customers, like shaking up how her clothes are presented. She showcased her fourth season collection using Pictofit AR technology on a Microsoft HoloLens, which allowed customers to try on the garments using AR and to switch outfits with a simple hand gesture.

SABINNA's interactive mixed reality project in 2017, in collaboration with the Fashion Innovation Agency and Reactive Reality's Pictofit app

She’s also well versed in how fashion brands can interact and communicate with consumers directly. In pre-pandemic times, the brand hosted a variety of in-store experiences, inviting customers to participate in hand-crafting workshops and to co-design garments in store.

“When lockdown happened, that part of the business had to be rethought as quickly as possible. I’ve always been keen on digital spaces, and always tried to bring innovation where and how we can, so we moved all our workshops and events to digital spaces, and we looked at what the demand is now,” she says. 

The pandemic provided the initial inspiration for Sabinna’s The Fabric of Reality fashion project, which she collaborated on with VR designer, Vladimir Ilic, who’s just as keen to explore the relationship between tradition and innovation as she is.

The concept for Sabinna’s virtual story world captures that collective feeling we can all now recognise: the breath of relief when you first step out the door after days, weeks or even longer in isolation.

“Instead of entering, why not exit into a virtual world? Going out is something we’ve all missed,” says Sabinna.

In Sabinna’s story world, everything is handcrafted: objects are stitched, hand-crocheted and hand-knit, with a sculptural, transparent, multi-layered garment at the centre. She used the family archive of original embroideries her grandmother created 30 years ago, which feature the woods and landscapes from central Asia where her granny grew up, to recreate the experience of texture in the virtual world. Sound helps to bring the story to life.

“The sound aspect can make or break this experience, too. Through sound, we manage to give people a feeling of comfort, home, connection and understanding that something has a special meaning. It brings an emotional aspect to visitors of the exhibition.”

Sabinna’s story world theme also asks the viewer to co-create as part of the project, to virtually pin flowers on the garment in whatever pattern they like. Unlike virtual fashion shows that have tried to replicate the physical in the digital realm, the idea behind The Fabric of Reality is about introducing viewers to something they would never be able to experience in person.

“The concept is about how to reconnect with yourself while exiting into a post-pandemic world,” says Sabinna. “It’s built on nature and mindfulness and the idea is that you can interact with things, create prints, add to items and have a full 360-degree experience, rather than just being a viewer of something. It will help you remember the experience on a very different level.”

In SABINNA's 2017 collection, guests could directly mix and match the pieces using Pictofit Augmented Reality technology on a Microsoft HoloLens

Inviting the viewer to become a co-creator is about more than enhancing their time in the virtual world - although who isn’t excited about the potential to play designer for an evening? Sabinna feels that the more customers understand what goes into the creativity, design and manufacture of a garment, the more they’ll appreciate how crucial sustainability is to the whole process.

It’s clear the pandemic is already changing how people approach their fashion purchases: they’re buying more for a lifetime rather than a season, and thinking about when they really need a physical product, as well as what makes a product special (and therefore worthy of purchasing). The current crisis has provided an opportunity to shift the focus to what the demand really is, as well as changing our attitudes towards technology - digital means something else now than it did pre-pandemic, and has become something we’ve all become much more comfortable with and conversant in.

“My hope is that after this pandemic fashion will not go back to normal. My hope is that finally this stubborn industry will wake up and create new systems, create new ways to work in a smarter and more inclusive way.

“We can finally bring a new layer to make it more diverse through the digital system. This might not be a popular opinion but there is no going back to Fashion Week the way it used to be - I just don’t see a need for it,” says Sabinna.

For Sabinna, much of the excitement she feels for this project has been bridging the physical and virtual realms, as well as introducing consumers to the possibility of using immersive technologies to help design physical garments. For customers to emerge with their own semi-bespoke creation they can wear in everyday life at the end of this would be the “perfect outcome” in the designer’s mind.

“I get really excited because there are no boundaries and no limits in the virtual world. I don’t have to worry if it fits, if it’s wearable, but I’m excited about how it can be commercially valuable. Fashion is a business, clothes are made to be worn,” she says.

The Fabric Of Reality, presented by RYOT and featuring Sabinna, Damara and Charli Cohen, airs July 29.