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Alex Blair 2018-05-21
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The 6-foot-long, 140-pound Chinese giant salamander is a being that defies belief—and seemingly the laws of the physical universe.

Once it grows big enough, not many critters dare touch it—save for, of course, humans.

Particularly the conservationists who are working to save the creature.

Really, the only place you’re guaranteed to actually find them anymore is in the country’s commercial salamander farms, which breed the things by the millions.

The idea to conserve the giant salamander, then, was to use these farms to replenish wild populations around China.

Great idea on paper—had the reality not been that the farms were pretty much only producing one lineage, from the Yellow River.

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Frances Buoy 2019-06-11
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From futuristic Star Trek-style patches which use cold plasma as part of the healing process to UV-activated superglue, we’ve covered a surprising number of high-tech wound dressings here at Digital Trends.

But here’s one we’ve not come across before: A special adhesive that’s able to seal up wounds better than medical alternatives, made from a goo excreted from the skin of Chinese giant salamanders.

“This is a truly exciting medical adhesive that is previously unavailable,” Yu Shrike Zhang, assistant professor in the Department of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, told Digital Trends.

“It is soft [and] able to comply with the shape of the tissue, yet strongly adhesive.

It sticks not only flesh together, but also to fat.

It is non-toxic, being [of] purely biological origin, and completely degrades over time, leaving no traces in the body.

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Bradley Liss 2019-06-10
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When Chinese giant salamanders are injured, they discharge white mucus from glands on their skin.

As new research shows, this sticky salamander goo makes for an excellent medical glue, sealing wounds and encouraging them to heal.

Alternative sutureless approaches are needed, but they have to be strong, sticky, bio-friendly, low cost, and easy to produce.

Some medical glues currently exist, but they’re far from perfect, with limitations including toxicity, poor elasticity, and excessive heat at the site of the injury.

New research published in Advanced Functional Materials shows that the skin secretions of the Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus) can be used to produce a medical adhesive for wound healing.

Researchers from Harvard Medical School, Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Sichuan University, and several other institutions contributed to the new paper.

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Mark Moore 2019-06-20
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Whether it’s robots modeled on cockroaches or medical adhesives derived from Chinese giant salamander excretions, the tech and scientific communities love nothing more than finding unique ways to repurpose the natural world.

A team of international researchers, hailing from the University of Pennsylvania, Lehigh University, and the Korea Institute of Science and Technology, who have developed a new type of snail mucus-inspired super glue.

Unlike ordinary glues, however, this type of super glue-like material can be easily reversed.

That means that it can easily switch between being an ultra strong adhesive and an unglued state.

“In our daily life, we use adhesives in many occasions,” Shu Yang, professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, told Digital Trends.

“We have a choice of using glue, which is liquid and permanent after cure and could be messy to apply, or tape, which is neater, flat, but less strong in adhesion strength.

collect
0
Alex Blair 2018-05-21
img

The 6-foot-long, 140-pound Chinese giant salamander is a being that defies belief—and seemingly the laws of the physical universe.

Once it grows big enough, not many critters dare touch it—save for, of course, humans.

Particularly the conservationists who are working to save the creature.

Really, the only place you’re guaranteed to actually find them anymore is in the country’s commercial salamander farms, which breed the things by the millions.

The idea to conserve the giant salamander, then, was to use these farms to replenish wild populations around China.

Great idea on paper—had the reality not been that the farms were pretty much only producing one lineage, from the Yellow River.

Bradley Liss 2019-06-10
img

When Chinese giant salamanders are injured, they discharge white mucus from glands on their skin.

As new research shows, this sticky salamander goo makes for an excellent medical glue, sealing wounds and encouraging them to heal.

Alternative sutureless approaches are needed, but they have to be strong, sticky, bio-friendly, low cost, and easy to produce.

Some medical glues currently exist, but they’re far from perfect, with limitations including toxicity, poor elasticity, and excessive heat at the site of the injury.

New research published in Advanced Functional Materials shows that the skin secretions of the Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus) can be used to produce a medical adhesive for wound healing.

Researchers from Harvard Medical School, Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Sichuan University, and several other institutions contributed to the new paper.

Frances Buoy 2019-06-11
img

From futuristic Star Trek-style patches which use cold plasma as part of the healing process to UV-activated superglue, we’ve covered a surprising number of high-tech wound dressings here at Digital Trends.

But here’s one we’ve not come across before: A special adhesive that’s able to seal up wounds better than medical alternatives, made from a goo excreted from the skin of Chinese giant salamanders.

“This is a truly exciting medical adhesive that is previously unavailable,” Yu Shrike Zhang, assistant professor in the Department of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, told Digital Trends.

“It is soft [and] able to comply with the shape of the tissue, yet strongly adhesive.

It sticks not only flesh together, but also to fat.

It is non-toxic, being [of] purely biological origin, and completely degrades over time, leaving no traces in the body.

Mark Moore 2019-06-20
img

Whether it’s robots modeled on cockroaches or medical adhesives derived from Chinese giant salamander excretions, the tech and scientific communities love nothing more than finding unique ways to repurpose the natural world.

A team of international researchers, hailing from the University of Pennsylvania, Lehigh University, and the Korea Institute of Science and Technology, who have developed a new type of snail mucus-inspired super glue.

Unlike ordinary glues, however, this type of super glue-like material can be easily reversed.

That means that it can easily switch between being an ultra strong adhesive and an unglued state.

“In our daily life, we use adhesives in many occasions,” Shu Yang, professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, told Digital Trends.

“We have a choice of using glue, which is liquid and permanent after cure and could be messy to apply, or tape, which is neater, flat, but less strong in adhesion strength.