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Harvey Broughton 2019-07-24
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If you do a quick Google search for ‘robot,’ you’ll be faced with a wall of white robots.

According to a recent study called “Robots and Racism,” human’s tendency to stereotype racial bias is seeping into the world of robotics.

Research by the Human Interface Technology (HIT) Lab in NZ found that the colors of a robot — white and black — have a social cue that results in how people interact with and respond to them.

The results suggest that people perceive robots with anthropomorphic features to have a race, and therefore, the same race-related prejudices that humans experience extend to robots, too.

The study’s findings were based on a shooter bias test, in which participants were asked to perceive threat level based on a split-second image of various black and white people, with robots occasionally popping up — it found that black robots that posed no threat were shot more than white ones.

“Robots and Racism” was led Dr. Christoph Bartneck, a professor at the HIT lab.

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Jerry Anderson 2016-10-24
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A man who was baffled to be invited to submit a paper on nuclear physics despite knowing nothing about nuclear physics managed to blag his way to acceptance anyway, by using the iOS autocomplete function to submit a load of keyword-packed rubbish -- and it was so impenetrable no one realised and the paper was accepted.

The story comes via the blog of Christoph Bartneck, who explained how he was erroneously asked by the International Conference on Atomic and Nuclear Physics to submit a research note.

He explained his research methodology with: "I started a sentence with 'Atomic' or 'Nuclear' and then randomly hit the auto-complete suggestions.

The text really does not make any sense."

The cherry on the top of the automatically generated cake was an image taken from Wikipedia, making his work mirror that of university students across the planet.

Sadly for the author, a future in nuclear science does not away -- the The International Conference on Atomic and Nuclear Physics is not a real nuclear physics conference, it is in fact a pretend organisation designed to spam people out of money in the name of conference attendance fees.

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David Bierman 2016-05-23
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Lego is once again being accused of ruining our children by encouraging violent play, with updated research finding that around 30 per cent of all modern Lego sets now come with some sort of shooting/stabbing implement in the box.

The designs are meant to enrich play with engaging conflict scenarios where aggression might be used for the purpose of overcoming imaginary evil.'

The violence in Lego products seems to have gone beyond just enriching game play."

The team at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand has the graphs to back it up, saying that the violence depicted within today's range of sets continues to increase, and warns that Lego is not as "innocent" as it once used to be back in the days before gang warfare and revenge killing took over as the top play activities of the under-12s.

And the catalogues are even worse, with the researcher saying that around 40 per cent of the activities shown include some sort of weapon or threatening activity, as the frowning minifigs of today stage arrests, bank robberies, fights, general yellow fist waving, drive-by assassinations of prominent Duplo figures and more.

Here's the data of shame that could be driving YOUR child to war:

Head researcher Christoph Bartneck said of the changes Lego has undergone in recent years: "The atmosphere of the violent acts is predominantly perceived as exciting" by a generation totally desensitised to aggression by CG superhero warfare and footballers.

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0
Glenn Vedder 2016-05-23
img

Lego is once again being accused of ruining our children by encouraging violent play, with updated research finding that around 30 per cent of all modern Lego sets now come with some sort of shooting/stabbing implement in the box.

The designs are meant to enrich play with engaging conflict scenarios where aggression might be used for the purpose of overcoming imaginary evil.'

The violence in Lego products seems to have gone beyond just enriching game play."

The team at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand has the graphs to back it up, saying that the violence depicted within today's range of sets continues to increase, and warns that Lego is not as "innocent" as it once used to be back in the days before gang warfare and revenge killing took over as the top play activities of the under-12s.

And the catalogues are even worse, with the researcher saying that around 40 per cent of the activities shown include some sort of weapon or threatening activity, as the frowning minifigs of today stage arrests, bank robberies, fights, general yellow fist waving, drive-by assassinations of prominent Duplo figures and more.

Here's the data of shame that could be driving YOUR child to war:

Head researcher Christoph Bartneck said of the changes Lego has undergone in recent years: "The atmosphere of the violent acts is predominantly perceived as exciting" by a generation totally desensitised to aggression by CG superhero warfare and footballers.

collect
0
Harvey Broughton 2019-07-24
img

If you do a quick Google search for ‘robot,’ you’ll be faced with a wall of white robots.

According to a recent study called “Robots and Racism,” human’s tendency to stereotype racial bias is seeping into the world of robotics.

Research by the Human Interface Technology (HIT) Lab in NZ found that the colors of a robot — white and black — have a social cue that results in how people interact with and respond to them.

The results suggest that people perceive robots with anthropomorphic features to have a race, and therefore, the same race-related prejudices that humans experience extend to robots, too.

The study’s findings were based on a shooter bias test, in which participants were asked to perceive threat level based on a split-second image of various black and white people, with robots occasionally popping up — it found that black robots that posed no threat were shot more than white ones.

“Robots and Racism” was led Dr. Christoph Bartneck, a professor at the HIT lab.

David Bierman 2016-05-23
img

Lego is once again being accused of ruining our children by encouraging violent play, with updated research finding that around 30 per cent of all modern Lego sets now come with some sort of shooting/stabbing implement in the box.

The designs are meant to enrich play with engaging conflict scenarios where aggression might be used for the purpose of overcoming imaginary evil.'

The violence in Lego products seems to have gone beyond just enriching game play."

The team at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand has the graphs to back it up, saying that the violence depicted within today's range of sets continues to increase, and warns that Lego is not as "innocent" as it once used to be back in the days before gang warfare and revenge killing took over as the top play activities of the under-12s.

And the catalogues are even worse, with the researcher saying that around 40 per cent of the activities shown include some sort of weapon or threatening activity, as the frowning minifigs of today stage arrests, bank robberies, fights, general yellow fist waving, drive-by assassinations of prominent Duplo figures and more.

Here's the data of shame that could be driving YOUR child to war:

Head researcher Christoph Bartneck said of the changes Lego has undergone in recent years: "The atmosphere of the violent acts is predominantly perceived as exciting" by a generation totally desensitised to aggression by CG superhero warfare and footballers.

Jerry Anderson 2016-10-24
img

A man who was baffled to be invited to submit a paper on nuclear physics despite knowing nothing about nuclear physics managed to blag his way to acceptance anyway, by using the iOS autocomplete function to submit a load of keyword-packed rubbish -- and it was so impenetrable no one realised and the paper was accepted.

The story comes via the blog of Christoph Bartneck, who explained how he was erroneously asked by the International Conference on Atomic and Nuclear Physics to submit a research note.

He explained his research methodology with: "I started a sentence with 'Atomic' or 'Nuclear' and then randomly hit the auto-complete suggestions.

The text really does not make any sense."

The cherry on the top of the automatically generated cake was an image taken from Wikipedia, making his work mirror that of university students across the planet.

Sadly for the author, a future in nuclear science does not away -- the The International Conference on Atomic and Nuclear Physics is not a real nuclear physics conference, it is in fact a pretend organisation designed to spam people out of money in the name of conference attendance fees.

Glenn Vedder 2016-05-23
img

Lego is once again being accused of ruining our children by encouraging violent play, with updated research finding that around 30 per cent of all modern Lego sets now come with some sort of shooting/stabbing implement in the box.

The designs are meant to enrich play with engaging conflict scenarios where aggression might be used for the purpose of overcoming imaginary evil.'

The violence in Lego products seems to have gone beyond just enriching game play."

The team at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand has the graphs to back it up, saying that the violence depicted within today's range of sets continues to increase, and warns that Lego is not as "innocent" as it once used to be back in the days before gang warfare and revenge killing took over as the top play activities of the under-12s.

And the catalogues are even worse, with the researcher saying that around 40 per cent of the activities shown include some sort of weapon or threatening activity, as the frowning minifigs of today stage arrests, bank robberies, fights, general yellow fist waving, drive-by assassinations of prominent Duplo figures and more.

Here's the data of shame that could be driving YOUR child to war:

Head researcher Christoph Bartneck said of the changes Lego has undergone in recent years: "The atmosphere of the violent acts is predominantly perceived as exciting" by a generation totally desensitised to aggression by CG superhero warfare and footballers.