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Jason Kowalski 2001-01-06
img

For 20 years now, El Reg has been looking for proof – is this finally it?

CES  It was almost exactly 20 years ago – January 6, 2001 – that Reg reader Erik Trent wrote to us bemoaning the tendency of tech journalists to repeat futuristic nonsense.…

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1
Jorge Medina 2017-02-15
img

The nephew of Sir Clive Sinclair has developed a successor to the Sinclair C5 electric vehicle, which he hopes can find a market.

Richard Westcott went to meet Grant Sinclair and check out his invention.

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0
Ronald Griffis 2017-09-22
img

Sir Clive Sinclair is one of Britain's most legendary tech pioneers.

In 1982, he created the ZX Spectrum - one of the first home computers and an important milestone in early gaming.

Three years later, in 1985, he created the Sinclair C5 - a strange little battery-powered go-kart.

It was, umm, slightly less successful - but it showed the scale of his ambitions.

To pay tribute to him - well, sort-of, anyway - check out the following song which reveals whatever happened to the Sinclair C6 - and many of Sir Clive's other inventions.

Okay, so perhaps The Ballad of Sir Clive Sinclair is slightly tongue-in-cheek.

collect
0
William Cutright 2017-06-27
img

The Sinclair C5 was a beautiful idea executed at just about the worst possible time.

Created by the British inventor Sir Clive Sinclair, the C5 was a personal electric vehicle that was designed to finally replace the car.

Unveiled in 1985, its little three-wheeled and open top design was seen as being an evolution of the bicycle with the public instead relying on nationalised transport services like trains and busses for longer journeys.

With a 250-watt engine that produced an eye-watering 0.34hp the Sinclair C5 was marketed as being an economical vehicle with 20-miles costing just 5p.

There was however, one minor problem with the C5.

Driving a C5 down a main road surrounded by cars took the nerves of a Nordic god while the plastic body and flimsy construction meant that if you were to hit anything the C5 would almost always come off much worse.

collect
0
Jeanne Hoffman 2017-02-22
img

Grant Sinclair, who shares a name and some DNA with his uncle Sir Clive Sinclair, would like to revolutionise cycling in a way that his uncle failed to do so with his C5 back in the 1980s.

It's a sort of spiritual successor to the electric tricycle called the Iris eTrike Extreme, yours for £3.5k at the end of this year.

The three-wheeled eTrike's 48 volt and 20Ah battery has been combined with a 750 Watt motor, which deliver way more power and oomph than you get from most of today's electric bikes, so, if it gets made and really exists, it should be quite the thrilling commuter pod for the mildly rich.

Its 30mph top speed means it'll need to be taxed, registered and insured like any of the higher spec electric bikes out there today, but the planned 50 mile range and the fact it has a lid so you don't need to get wet and can wear normal trousers really ought to have it become a smash with the commuters of the near future.

...it doesn't look quite as cool when wobbling down a road as it appears in the renders.

Want more updates from Gizmodo UK?

collect
0
John Burns 2017-02-22
img

It is remembered as one of the biggest disasters in technology history and the moment when a celebrated inventor pushed the boundaries too far, but the Sinclair C5 is set for a comeback.

The electric tricycle developed by Sir Clive Sinclair has been reborn by his nephew, 32 years after its predecessor first went on sale.

The original C5 was seen as a revolutionary electric vehicle that could reach speeds of 15mph, and at £399 would be a cheap way to get around, exempt from road tax and insurance.

However, it struggled with hills and there were fears that it wouldn't be seen in traffic.

Of around 14,000 that were made, only around 5,000 were sold and its manufacturer went bust, ending production after just nine months.

In 2013 it was voted the greatest innovation disaster of all time.

collect
0
William Jones 2017-03-09

There’s always an element of risk whenever you back a crowdfunding campaign.

It doesn’t matter if the campaign is overfunded, or is backed by a well-known figure in the tech industry, there’s always a chance you don’t get what you paid for.

The Sinclair ZX Vega was supposed to take the iconic home computer from the 1980’s, the ZX Spectrum, and transform it into a portable form-factor.

This resonated a chord with nostalgic gamers, and the ZX Vega smashed its funding goal.

By March 27, 2016, it was 367 percent funded.

The device also earned the backing of ZX Spectrum inventor Sir Clive Sinclair.

collect
0
Christopher Driskell 2021-02-12
img

One of my favorite lockdown pastimes has been trawling the history books for old adverts of tech. The best finds are those that are so far ahead of their time they’re laughably mundane by today’s standards but also hyper retro in design. Dig a little deeper into these nuggets of days gone by, and you’ll see something more profound: an idea, a vision of what engineers thought the future could and should look like. It’s the space between sci-fi and reality. [Read: How Polestar is using blockchain to increase transparency] The Sinclair C5 is a perfect example. The C5 was…

This story continues at The Next Web
collect
0
Garland Marsella 2018-05-23
img

Will legendary Brit inventor step in to save the day?

Customers of Retro Computers ltd, the ZX Spectrum themed reboot firm, have now set up a website asking Sir Clive Sinclair to intervene in the non-delivery debacle.

The petition asking the Spectrum daddy to get involved was set up by disgruntled RCL customer Graham Kenny at the web address CliveHelpUs.website, with text on its homepage exhorting people who paid money to RCL via crowdfunding website Indiegogo to sign it with their order ID number to prove their authenticity.

The Sinclair ZX Spectrum Vega Plus was and is still an amazing concept, but with so many false deadlines and no real evidence of production, and also an imminent delivery deadline with Indiegogo for the end of May 2018 it looks like the campaign will be shut down and backers will come away empty handed.

It is for this reason that we have created this petition site, to give backers the opportunity to inform those who are in charge and whose salaries we've paid that they need to finally resolve this once and for all and attempt to restore some faith and the good name and brand of Sir Clive Sinclair.

As regular readers know, this all hinges around RCL's continued failure to deliver its ZX Spectrum Vega+ handheld console, which was first advertised years ago on crowdfunding website Indiegogo as being ready to go into production.

collect
0
Trisha Lewis 2017-11-10
img

Where's the money coming from to fund these sueballs, angry folk ask watchdog

Disgruntled customers of ZX Spectrum Vega+ firm Retro Computers Ltd have complained to the Solicitors’ Regulation Authority (SRA), alleging ringfenced company funds are being diverted into its legal battles.

The gist of the grievances is an allegation that some of the £513,000 given to RCL by 5,000 members of the public to put the ZX Spectrum Vega+ handheld console into production was instead spent on lawyers’ fees during a battles over control of the company that produced the devices.

Complainants claimed their cash was held in trust for the sole purpose of making their consoles and, under the terms of RCL's governing shareholders' agreement, should be spent on this alone.

Another, whose first computer was a ZX81, said that the Vega+ saga, "instead of rekindling fond memories of my early days with a computer [has] just left me with a sour memory."

He further claimed: "RCL seem to spend all their energy in attacking people who criticise them instead of spending a moment on actually producing a product they took more than half a million pounds from backers, in good faith, which they appear to have never intended on using to make a product."

collect
0
Milagros Lester 2018-05-04
img

A fresh war of words has erupted over at ailing ZX Spectrum reboot firm Retro Computers Ltd – this time over the corporate involvement of legendary British inventor Sir Clive Sinclair himself.

RCL, as regular readers know, is the company that was supposed to have delivered a ZX Spectrum-themed handheld game console, called the Vega+, to about 4,500 people who paid money for the product via crowdfunding platform Indiegogo two years ago.

A pile of cash, Sir Clive, and that console

Andrews and Smith are trying to remove Levy as a director of RCL, along with those Levy appointed as directors after the former pair quit the company in April 2016.

Whoever keeps Sir Clive on their side will be in control of RCL – and the £513,000 that is supposedly still in its bank account.

A press release issued a week ago by Andrews and Smith stated that SRL was backing them.

collect
0
Donald Ellison 2016-08-09
img

Image copyright Image caption Concept art for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum Vega

The founders of a crowd-funded project to make a retro computer games console, backed by Spectrum inventor Sir Clive Sinclair, have distanced themselves from the company they used to run.

Retro Computers has received £417,375 $542,000 from an Indiegogo campaign.

But former directors Paul Andrews and Chris Smith said they had been unable to answer backers' concerns and were now "publicly distancing" themselves.

The company accused Mr Andrews and Mr Smith of developing a rival product.

It has also attempted to crowd-fund a retro computer device - although its is based on the Commodore 64 - but failed to meet its target.

collect
0
Edward Scates 2017-03-09
img

Crowdfunding platform Indiegogo intervened to stop a handheld retro computer console campaign from acquiring further funding, the BBC has learned.

Bur then Indiegogo halted further fundraising because of delivery delays and a lack of communication to backers.

The BBC understands no consoles have been delivered to backers, despite a pledge last month that they would "ship after 20 Feb 2017".

And the company behind the project - Retro Computers Limited - suggested these details might put its team at risk.

"Following a credible threat of violence against personnel of Retro Computers Limited, including threats made as recently as last night, we asked [technology desk editor] Leo Kelion and the BBC to refrain from publishing a story we believe to be factually inaccurate and might put people at risk of physical harm, alarm and distress," Retro Computers Limited founder David Levy said in a statement on Wednesday.

RCL had already received more than £513,000 ($624,000) from Indiegogo crowdfunders for the Vega .

collect
0
Keith Maldonado 2017-02-25
img

One of the UK’s most high profile crowdfunding projects – an effort to revive the iconic Sinclair ZX Spectrum computer – has been beset by infighting and legal battles.

The turmoil is another blow to the nascent crowdfunding industry, which relies on thousands of online backers to support projects but has suffered a string of damaging failures.

The ZX Spectrum, the 1982 computer invented by the British entrepreneur Sir Clive Sinclair, helped bring video games to the home with titles such as Manic Miner and Jet Set Willy.

Retro Computers Limited, which plans to create a handheld version, has received more than £500,000 from thousands of backers.

It was the biggest British project on crowdfunding website Indiegogo last year and was endorsed by Sir Clive himself.

However, it has been repeatedly delayed after its co-founder Paul Andrews and fellow director Chris Smith left last year, kicking off court battles over Mr Andrews’ shareholding.

collect
0
Isiah Jone 2016-12-23
img

The makers of a handheld ZX Spectrum console which has the support of Sir Clive Sinclair have blamed issues with the device's buttons for its delayed launch.

The retro gaming console received almost £500,000 $0.6m in crowdfunding earlier this year and was due to ship in September.

Retro Gaming Computers Limited has told the BBC the first batch will now ship in February 2017.

It features 1,000 pre-installed games.

The firm had said in an update on its Indiegogo page titled A Pain In The Buttons that testing had been "trickier than previously suspected".

Many backers leaving comments on the now-closed fundraising page had requested more information about what was happening.

collect
0
Harvey Broughton 2018-06-15
img

Crowdfunder asks to be reimbursed on behalf of backers

Crowdfunding platform Indiegogo has revealed to The Register that it has set its lawyers on flailing ZX Spectrum reboot firm Retro Computers Ltd.

The platform confirmed to us that its corporate attorney has written to RCL seeking reimbursement from the company so that it can pay back RCL’s customers, or “backers,” as Indiegogo refers to people who use its website to place orders for production-ready items.

As regular readers know, RCL was the company that took £513,000 from the general public to put its ZX Spectrum Vega+ console into production.

Just under 5,000 people paid money to RCL through Indiegogo for one or more of the £105 consoles, which in their originally advertised form had been designed by the late, great Rick Dickinson, designer of Sir Clive Sinclair’s original ZX Spectrum.

Over the past two years RCL has consistently and repeatedly failed to deliver its product, raising questions about the viability of the crowdfunding business model and how it interacts with long-established consumer protections for the sale of goods.

collect
0
Jason Kowalski 2001-01-06
img

For 20 years now, El Reg has been looking for proof – is this finally it?

CES  It was almost exactly 20 years ago – January 6, 2001 – that Reg reader Erik Trent wrote to us bemoaning the tendency of tech journalists to repeat futuristic nonsense.…

Ronald Griffis 2017-09-22
img

Sir Clive Sinclair is one of Britain's most legendary tech pioneers.

In 1982, he created the ZX Spectrum - one of the first home computers and an important milestone in early gaming.

Three years later, in 1985, he created the Sinclair C5 - a strange little battery-powered go-kart.

It was, umm, slightly less successful - but it showed the scale of his ambitions.

To pay tribute to him - well, sort-of, anyway - check out the following song which reveals whatever happened to the Sinclair C6 - and many of Sir Clive's other inventions.

Okay, so perhaps The Ballad of Sir Clive Sinclair is slightly tongue-in-cheek.

Jeanne Hoffman 2017-02-22
img

Grant Sinclair, who shares a name and some DNA with his uncle Sir Clive Sinclair, would like to revolutionise cycling in a way that his uncle failed to do so with his C5 back in the 1980s.

It's a sort of spiritual successor to the electric tricycle called the Iris eTrike Extreme, yours for £3.5k at the end of this year.

The three-wheeled eTrike's 48 volt and 20Ah battery has been combined with a 750 Watt motor, which deliver way more power and oomph than you get from most of today's electric bikes, so, if it gets made and really exists, it should be quite the thrilling commuter pod for the mildly rich.

Its 30mph top speed means it'll need to be taxed, registered and insured like any of the higher spec electric bikes out there today, but the planned 50 mile range and the fact it has a lid so you don't need to get wet and can wear normal trousers really ought to have it become a smash with the commuters of the near future.

...it doesn't look quite as cool when wobbling down a road as it appears in the renders.

Want more updates from Gizmodo UK?

William Jones 2017-03-09

There’s always an element of risk whenever you back a crowdfunding campaign.

It doesn’t matter if the campaign is overfunded, or is backed by a well-known figure in the tech industry, there’s always a chance you don’t get what you paid for.

The Sinclair ZX Vega was supposed to take the iconic home computer from the 1980’s, the ZX Spectrum, and transform it into a portable form-factor.

This resonated a chord with nostalgic gamers, and the ZX Vega smashed its funding goal.

By March 27, 2016, it was 367 percent funded.

The device also earned the backing of ZX Spectrum inventor Sir Clive Sinclair.

Garland Marsella 2018-05-23
img

Will legendary Brit inventor step in to save the day?

Customers of Retro Computers ltd, the ZX Spectrum themed reboot firm, have now set up a website asking Sir Clive Sinclair to intervene in the non-delivery debacle.

The petition asking the Spectrum daddy to get involved was set up by disgruntled RCL customer Graham Kenny at the web address CliveHelpUs.website, with text on its homepage exhorting people who paid money to RCL via crowdfunding website Indiegogo to sign it with their order ID number to prove their authenticity.

The Sinclair ZX Spectrum Vega Plus was and is still an amazing concept, but with so many false deadlines and no real evidence of production, and also an imminent delivery deadline with Indiegogo for the end of May 2018 it looks like the campaign will be shut down and backers will come away empty handed.

It is for this reason that we have created this petition site, to give backers the opportunity to inform those who are in charge and whose salaries we've paid that they need to finally resolve this once and for all and attempt to restore some faith and the good name and brand of Sir Clive Sinclair.

As regular readers know, this all hinges around RCL's continued failure to deliver its ZX Spectrum Vega+ handheld console, which was first advertised years ago on crowdfunding website Indiegogo as being ready to go into production.

Milagros Lester 2018-05-04
img

A fresh war of words has erupted over at ailing ZX Spectrum reboot firm Retro Computers Ltd – this time over the corporate involvement of legendary British inventor Sir Clive Sinclair himself.

RCL, as regular readers know, is the company that was supposed to have delivered a ZX Spectrum-themed handheld game console, called the Vega+, to about 4,500 people who paid money for the product via crowdfunding platform Indiegogo two years ago.

A pile of cash, Sir Clive, and that console

Andrews and Smith are trying to remove Levy as a director of RCL, along with those Levy appointed as directors after the former pair quit the company in April 2016.

Whoever keeps Sir Clive on their side will be in control of RCL – and the £513,000 that is supposedly still in its bank account.

A press release issued a week ago by Andrews and Smith stated that SRL was backing them.

Edward Scates 2017-03-09
img

Crowdfunding platform Indiegogo intervened to stop a handheld retro computer console campaign from acquiring further funding, the BBC has learned.

Bur then Indiegogo halted further fundraising because of delivery delays and a lack of communication to backers.

The BBC understands no consoles have been delivered to backers, despite a pledge last month that they would "ship after 20 Feb 2017".

And the company behind the project - Retro Computers Limited - suggested these details might put its team at risk.

"Following a credible threat of violence against personnel of Retro Computers Limited, including threats made as recently as last night, we asked [technology desk editor] Leo Kelion and the BBC to refrain from publishing a story we believe to be factually inaccurate and might put people at risk of physical harm, alarm and distress," Retro Computers Limited founder David Levy said in a statement on Wednesday.

RCL had already received more than £513,000 ($624,000) from Indiegogo crowdfunders for the Vega .

Isiah Jone 2016-12-23
img

The makers of a handheld ZX Spectrum console which has the support of Sir Clive Sinclair have blamed issues with the device's buttons for its delayed launch.

The retro gaming console received almost £500,000 $0.6m in crowdfunding earlier this year and was due to ship in September.

Retro Gaming Computers Limited has told the BBC the first batch will now ship in February 2017.

It features 1,000 pre-installed games.

The firm had said in an update on its Indiegogo page titled A Pain In The Buttons that testing had been "trickier than previously suspected".

Many backers leaving comments on the now-closed fundraising page had requested more information about what was happening.

Jorge Medina 2017-02-15
img

The nephew of Sir Clive Sinclair has developed a successor to the Sinclair C5 electric vehicle, which he hopes can find a market.

Richard Westcott went to meet Grant Sinclair and check out his invention.

William Cutright 2017-06-27
img

The Sinclair C5 was a beautiful idea executed at just about the worst possible time.

Created by the British inventor Sir Clive Sinclair, the C5 was a personal electric vehicle that was designed to finally replace the car.

Unveiled in 1985, its little three-wheeled and open top design was seen as being an evolution of the bicycle with the public instead relying on nationalised transport services like trains and busses for longer journeys.

With a 250-watt engine that produced an eye-watering 0.34hp the Sinclair C5 was marketed as being an economical vehicle with 20-miles costing just 5p.

There was however, one minor problem with the C5.

Driving a C5 down a main road surrounded by cars took the nerves of a Nordic god while the plastic body and flimsy construction meant that if you were to hit anything the C5 would almost always come off much worse.

John Burns 2017-02-22
img

It is remembered as one of the biggest disasters in technology history and the moment when a celebrated inventor pushed the boundaries too far, but the Sinclair C5 is set for a comeback.

The electric tricycle developed by Sir Clive Sinclair has been reborn by his nephew, 32 years after its predecessor first went on sale.

The original C5 was seen as a revolutionary electric vehicle that could reach speeds of 15mph, and at £399 would be a cheap way to get around, exempt from road tax and insurance.

However, it struggled with hills and there were fears that it wouldn't be seen in traffic.

Of around 14,000 that were made, only around 5,000 were sold and its manufacturer went bust, ending production after just nine months.

In 2013 it was voted the greatest innovation disaster of all time.

Christopher Driskell 2021-02-12
img

One of my favorite lockdown pastimes has been trawling the history books for old adverts of tech. The best finds are those that are so far ahead of their time they’re laughably mundane by today’s standards but also hyper retro in design. Dig a little deeper into these nuggets of days gone by, and you’ll see something more profound: an idea, a vision of what engineers thought the future could and should look like. It’s the space between sci-fi and reality. [Read: How Polestar is using blockchain to increase transparency] The Sinclair C5 is a perfect example. The C5 was…

This story continues at The Next Web
Trisha Lewis 2017-11-10
img

Where's the money coming from to fund these sueballs, angry folk ask watchdog

Disgruntled customers of ZX Spectrum Vega+ firm Retro Computers Ltd have complained to the Solicitors’ Regulation Authority (SRA), alleging ringfenced company funds are being diverted into its legal battles.

The gist of the grievances is an allegation that some of the £513,000 given to RCL by 5,000 members of the public to put the ZX Spectrum Vega+ handheld console into production was instead spent on lawyers’ fees during a battles over control of the company that produced the devices.

Complainants claimed their cash was held in trust for the sole purpose of making their consoles and, under the terms of RCL's governing shareholders' agreement, should be spent on this alone.

Another, whose first computer was a ZX81, said that the Vega+ saga, "instead of rekindling fond memories of my early days with a computer [has] just left me with a sour memory."

He further claimed: "RCL seem to spend all their energy in attacking people who criticise them instead of spending a moment on actually producing a product they took more than half a million pounds from backers, in good faith, which they appear to have never intended on using to make a product."

Donald Ellison 2016-08-09
img

Image copyright Image caption Concept art for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum Vega

The founders of a crowd-funded project to make a retro computer games console, backed by Spectrum inventor Sir Clive Sinclair, have distanced themselves from the company they used to run.

Retro Computers has received £417,375 $542,000 from an Indiegogo campaign.

But former directors Paul Andrews and Chris Smith said they had been unable to answer backers' concerns and were now "publicly distancing" themselves.

The company accused Mr Andrews and Mr Smith of developing a rival product.

It has also attempted to crowd-fund a retro computer device - although its is based on the Commodore 64 - but failed to meet its target.

Keith Maldonado 2017-02-25
img

One of the UK’s most high profile crowdfunding projects – an effort to revive the iconic Sinclair ZX Spectrum computer – has been beset by infighting and legal battles.

The turmoil is another blow to the nascent crowdfunding industry, which relies on thousands of online backers to support projects but has suffered a string of damaging failures.

The ZX Spectrum, the 1982 computer invented by the British entrepreneur Sir Clive Sinclair, helped bring video games to the home with titles such as Manic Miner and Jet Set Willy.

Retro Computers Limited, which plans to create a handheld version, has received more than £500,000 from thousands of backers.

It was the biggest British project on crowdfunding website Indiegogo last year and was endorsed by Sir Clive himself.

However, it has been repeatedly delayed after its co-founder Paul Andrews and fellow director Chris Smith left last year, kicking off court battles over Mr Andrews’ shareholding.

Harvey Broughton 2018-06-15
img

Crowdfunder asks to be reimbursed on behalf of backers

Crowdfunding platform Indiegogo has revealed to The Register that it has set its lawyers on flailing ZX Spectrum reboot firm Retro Computers Ltd.

The platform confirmed to us that its corporate attorney has written to RCL seeking reimbursement from the company so that it can pay back RCL’s customers, or “backers,” as Indiegogo refers to people who use its website to place orders for production-ready items.

As regular readers know, RCL was the company that took £513,000 from the general public to put its ZX Spectrum Vega+ console into production.

Just under 5,000 people paid money to RCL through Indiegogo for one or more of the £105 consoles, which in their originally advertised form had been designed by the late, great Rick Dickinson, designer of Sir Clive Sinclair’s original ZX Spectrum.

Over the past two years RCL has consistently and repeatedly failed to deliver its product, raising questions about the viability of the crowdfunding business model and how it interacts with long-established consumer protections for the sale of goods.