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Terry Fulmer 2017-12-19
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The Bureau of International Cooperation at the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) has told the global internet giants they won’t be changing regulations, so obey them or go somewhere else.

Numerous internet brands, including Facebook, Google and Twitter, have been blocked in China in the last couple of years owing to censorship and privacy rules, and this doesn’t look like it’s going to change.

There has been pressure on governments such as China to open up rules and create a more Westernised internet, but the country is refusing to bow to pressure.

These are our rules, get used to them or get lost, seems to be the message.

According to Reuters, at the Internet Governance Forum at the UN’s European headquarters in Geneva, the CAC has been quite frank with the internet giants.

“The condition is that they have to abide by Chinese law and regulations,” said said Qi Xiaoxia, Director General of the CAC.

collect
0
David Erb 2021-07-12
img

More crackdowns on tech companies planning an IPO, as foreshadowed by the Cyberspace Administration of China

The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) has announced further restrictions for Chinese tech companies, including a compulsory security audit for companies with more than one million registered users that plan to list overseas.…

collect
0
George Comer 2021-07-27
img
tencent antitrust techwar gaming streaming WeChat
This is the first time Tencent has suspended new user registration for WeChat, which many people rely on for communication.
collect
5
James Maloch 2021-07-02
img
The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) said on its website that Didi was not allowed to register new users during its investigation
collect
0
Robert Flenard 2016-07-05
img

Regulators in China are cracking down on news outlets that source content from social media in what it is painting as an effort to dampen the reporting of rumors and other non-factual information.

According to the Cyberspace Administration of China, it is now forbidden to use hearsay to create news or use conjecture and imagination to distort the fact.

In other words, online media isn t allowed to report news without specifying the sources or report news that quotes untrue origins.

The changes come just days after Xu Lin replaced Lu Wei as the deputy head of the organization.

Lin is said to be one of President Xi Jinping s key supports according to the South China Morning Post.

The administration has reportedly ordered its regional subordinates to strengthen supervision and inspection of news sites and severely punish those who publish fake news.

collect
0
Brian Christy 2021-07-06
img
The ride-hailing giant's app was ordered to be removed from mobile app stores in China on Sunday by the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) which followed an official investigation into the company's handling of customer data
collect
0
Gerardo Diaz 2018-11-16
img

China to require detailed user logs from tech companies – Financial Times

What happened: Beginning November 30, the Cyberspace Administration of China announced yesterday, all online service providers with “public opinion or social mobilization capacity” should prepare to provide user information to the government.

The regulation will apply to blogs, microblogs, forums, news providers, and video streaming platforms.

Companies will be required to log the real names of their users, as well as logs of comments, chats, and other user data.

They’re also mandated to employ systems to report such information to the government, and comply with any spot checks carried out by regulators.

Why it’s important: Chinese regulators have been taking more steps to heighten the state’s access to data collected by private companies.

collect
0
James Williams 2016-07-05
img

In another move to censor and control the media, the Cyberspace Administration of China has moved to crack down on news reports that use information on social media.

The Chinese government says this is an attempt to stop the spread of false news, but it s obviously another move by the government to control public opinion.

According to The New York Times, the Cyberspace Administration of China issued a statement saying It is strictly forbidden for websites not to specify or to falsify news sources and to use hearsay to create news or use conjecture and imagination to distort the facts, and that they plan to punish more news outlets and websites that directly as news reports unverified content found on online platforms such as social media.

And according to the South China Morning Post, online outlets must get approval from the government before reporting news found on social media.

The Cyberspace Administration statement said that the agency had punished multiple Chinese news websites, but didn t give any details about how exactly these outlets were punished.

Here are three examples of stories deemed to be untrue by the Chinese Government, according to the NYT:

collect
0
Seth Logan 2017-11-22
img

One of the leading figures behind the Great Firewall of China is under investigation for corruption.

According to state media outlet Xinhua, China's anti-corruption agency is investigating Lu Wei, although no specific allegations have been revealed.

Up until last year, Lu Wei was head of internet watchdog, the Cyberspace Administration of China, which keeps tight controls on citizens' use of social networks, VPNs and other online communication.

The former internet czar is the latest official to be implicated in an ongoing campaign to root out graft among Chinese officials.

China continues its policy of censoring and blocking content and communication online.

Chat app Skype was the latest to be removed from the country's app stores this week.

collect
0
Thomas Saysongkham 2018-09-27
img

China shuts down American-listed news site Phoenix New Media over ‘illegal’ coverage – SCMP

What happened: The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) has ordered Phoenix New Media’s news portal ifeng.com to shut down its technology channel for a month and suspend its general news, financial news, mobile website, and app for two weeks.

The internet regulator said the site had “disseminated illegal and harmful information, distorted news headlines and shared news information in violation of rules”, and ordered it to undergo “thorough and in-depth rectification”.

Why it’s important: Online content providers, including news services and entertainment platforms, have faced increasing scrutiny from government departments.

Short video platforms have been targeted for hosting “inappropriate” content in an effort to increase government controls over cultural content.

ifeng.com’s suspension comes a week after CAC chief Zhuang Rongwen promised to further extend control over online spaces, saying “positive energy” should be promoted, while “negative elements” should be suppressed.

collect
0
David Carter 2016-07-04
img

We may have been banned from citing Wikipedia articles in our high school papers, but according to new Chinese laws, it s social media that is a truly illegitimate source for journalism.

On Sunday evening, the Cyberspace Administration of China declared that online media would not be able to report news from social media sites without the express approval of the government.

This, the country s internet regulator says, will stymie the spread of falsehoods and rumors.

It s the latest in a string of regulations the Chinese government has levied on denizens of the digital world.

From app developers to writers, few are unaffected by the administration s tough laws that are often described a roundabout form of censorship.

In China s latest law affecting social media sites, the Cyberspace Administration noted, It is forbidden to use hearsay to create news or use conjecture and imagination to distort the facts.

collect
0
Edward Hudson 2019-01-11
img

China imposes blockchain rules to enable ‘orderly development’ – Reuters

What happened: The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) has released the finalized regulations concerning blockchain information service providers, which will come into effect on February 15.

Under the new regulations, which consist of 23 articles, blockchain companies will be required to implement real-name registration, maintain correspondence with authorities, and provide relevant information as requested.

Why it’s important: Chinese authorities first proposed the draft regulations last October in a bid to increase control over the burgeoning blockchain industry.

Though the government claims to be a blockchain proponent, it has cracked down on cryptocurrencies, initial coin offerings (ICOs), and exchange services since 2017.

The move against cryptocurrencies has driven away many homegrown exchanges and wallet services.

collect
0
Carlo Prine 2016-07-04
img

China s Internet censorship body has warned online media not to use stories found on social networks as the basis of news reports without first asking permission from the authorities.

The Cyberspace Administration of China said: It is forbidden to use hearsay to create news or use conjecture and imagination to distort the facts.

According to a story in the South China Morning Post: "No website is allowed to report public news without specifying the sources, or report news that quotes untrue origins."

The latest crackdown on Internet media comes just days after Xu Lin, formerly the deputy head of the Cyberspace Administration of China, replaced his boss, Lu Wei, as the guardian of China s online world.

The SCMP notes: Xu is regarded as one of President Xi Jinping s key supporters, and this move is seen as a further tightening of Xi s grip on cyberspace.

Back in February, Ars reported on new regulations that made it much harder for Western media to operate in China.

collect
0
Robert Rock 2018-10-22
img

China requires blockchain-based information service providers to register users using real names, censor postings and store user data–South China Morning Post

What happened: Last Friday, the Cyberspace Administration of China released the first draft of a set of regulations that could substantially restrict blockchain development within the country.

Under the proposed regulations, which have been released for public consultation until November 2, blockchain-based service providers in China would require all users to register their real names and state ID numbers.

Providers would also be responsible for censoring content that poses a risk to national security, and make user data available for government inspection.

It is currently unclear when the regulations would be instated, if at all.

Why it’s important: Although the rules are still under development, they indicate China’s continued attempt to regulate blockchain-related enterprises within the country.

collect
0
Dion Esparza 2016-06-26

BEIJING—China s internet regulator has issued new rules for online search and advertising, about six weeks after it opened an investigation of Chinese search giant Baidu Inc. s practices.

On Saturday, the Cyberspace Administration of China announced that search companies must provide objective, fair and authoritative results , which shouldn t harm the rights and interests of the nation, the public and other legal organizations.

The rule also urges service providers to identify and label paid ads clearly, distinguishing them from regular search results, as well as limiting the number of paid ads on each page.

Some search results include illegal contents like rumors, obscenity, violence, homicide and terror; some search results lack objectivity and fairness, which violates the corporate moral standards, misleads and affects public judgment, the official said.

It also had said the amount of money an advertiser has paid to the search engine shouldn t factor into search results.

On Sunday, Baidu President Zhang Yaqin said on a World Economic Forum panel in the northern Chinese city of Tianjin that following Baidu s crisis in the last six months, the company is working on rebuilding trust.

collect
0
Ronald Griffis 2017-08-16
img

China is planning four to six “world-renowned” cybersecurity schools by 2027, as it ramps up its efforts to build a strong army of professionals to combat cyber attacks, in an increasing digitalised world.

The Cyberspace Administration of China, the country’s top internet regulator, and the Ministry of Education said they will roll out the nationwide project over the next decade in order to create “internationally recognised and influential” schools for the training of cybersecurity talent.

The two are inviting Chinese universities, which have sizeable cybersecurity faculties, to sign up for the project.

Once the best have been chosen, they will be provided with policies and investment to remake themselves as leading cybersecurity schools, the Ministry said in a notice published on it website on Tuesday.

The ambitious plan comes within three months of China’s new Cybersecurity Law, which came into effect on June 1, fuelling the need for top talent to better protect the country’s 751 million people who actively connect with the internet, via a social network, to their bank accounts.

The two authorities said they will explore the possibilities of setting up juvenile classes too for children who show gifted skills in cybersecurity, as well as improving current training programmes for those who study cybersecurity in colleges and graduate schools.

collect
0
Terry Fulmer 2017-12-19
img

The Bureau of International Cooperation at the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) has told the global internet giants they won’t be changing regulations, so obey them or go somewhere else.

Numerous internet brands, including Facebook, Google and Twitter, have been blocked in China in the last couple of years owing to censorship and privacy rules, and this doesn’t look like it’s going to change.

There has been pressure on governments such as China to open up rules and create a more Westernised internet, but the country is refusing to bow to pressure.

These are our rules, get used to them or get lost, seems to be the message.

According to Reuters, at the Internet Governance Forum at the UN’s European headquarters in Geneva, the CAC has been quite frank with the internet giants.

“The condition is that they have to abide by Chinese law and regulations,” said said Qi Xiaoxia, Director General of the CAC.

George Comer 2021-07-27
img
tencent antitrust techwar gaming streaming WeChat
This is the first time Tencent has suspended new user registration for WeChat, which many people rely on for communication.
Robert Flenard 2016-07-05
img

Regulators in China are cracking down on news outlets that source content from social media in what it is painting as an effort to dampen the reporting of rumors and other non-factual information.

According to the Cyberspace Administration of China, it is now forbidden to use hearsay to create news or use conjecture and imagination to distort the fact.

In other words, online media isn t allowed to report news without specifying the sources or report news that quotes untrue origins.

The changes come just days after Xu Lin replaced Lu Wei as the deputy head of the organization.

Lin is said to be one of President Xi Jinping s key supports according to the South China Morning Post.

The administration has reportedly ordered its regional subordinates to strengthen supervision and inspection of news sites and severely punish those who publish fake news.

Gerardo Diaz 2018-11-16
img

China to require detailed user logs from tech companies – Financial Times

What happened: Beginning November 30, the Cyberspace Administration of China announced yesterday, all online service providers with “public opinion or social mobilization capacity” should prepare to provide user information to the government.

The regulation will apply to blogs, microblogs, forums, news providers, and video streaming platforms.

Companies will be required to log the real names of their users, as well as logs of comments, chats, and other user data.

They’re also mandated to employ systems to report such information to the government, and comply with any spot checks carried out by regulators.

Why it’s important: Chinese regulators have been taking more steps to heighten the state’s access to data collected by private companies.

Seth Logan 2017-11-22
img

One of the leading figures behind the Great Firewall of China is under investigation for corruption.

According to state media outlet Xinhua, China's anti-corruption agency is investigating Lu Wei, although no specific allegations have been revealed.

Up until last year, Lu Wei was head of internet watchdog, the Cyberspace Administration of China, which keeps tight controls on citizens' use of social networks, VPNs and other online communication.

The former internet czar is the latest official to be implicated in an ongoing campaign to root out graft among Chinese officials.

China continues its policy of censoring and blocking content and communication online.

Chat app Skype was the latest to be removed from the country's app stores this week.

David Carter 2016-07-04
img

We may have been banned from citing Wikipedia articles in our high school papers, but according to new Chinese laws, it s social media that is a truly illegitimate source for journalism.

On Sunday evening, the Cyberspace Administration of China declared that online media would not be able to report news from social media sites without the express approval of the government.

This, the country s internet regulator says, will stymie the spread of falsehoods and rumors.

It s the latest in a string of regulations the Chinese government has levied on denizens of the digital world.

From app developers to writers, few are unaffected by the administration s tough laws that are often described a roundabout form of censorship.

In China s latest law affecting social media sites, the Cyberspace Administration noted, It is forbidden to use hearsay to create news or use conjecture and imagination to distort the facts.

Carlo Prine 2016-07-04
img

China s Internet censorship body has warned online media not to use stories found on social networks as the basis of news reports without first asking permission from the authorities.

The Cyberspace Administration of China said: It is forbidden to use hearsay to create news or use conjecture and imagination to distort the facts.

According to a story in the South China Morning Post: "No website is allowed to report public news without specifying the sources, or report news that quotes untrue origins."

The latest crackdown on Internet media comes just days after Xu Lin, formerly the deputy head of the Cyberspace Administration of China, replaced his boss, Lu Wei, as the guardian of China s online world.

The SCMP notes: Xu is regarded as one of President Xi Jinping s key supporters, and this move is seen as a further tightening of Xi s grip on cyberspace.

Back in February, Ars reported on new regulations that made it much harder for Western media to operate in China.

Dion Esparza 2016-06-26

BEIJING—China s internet regulator has issued new rules for online search and advertising, about six weeks after it opened an investigation of Chinese search giant Baidu Inc. s practices.

On Saturday, the Cyberspace Administration of China announced that search companies must provide objective, fair and authoritative results , which shouldn t harm the rights and interests of the nation, the public and other legal organizations.

The rule also urges service providers to identify and label paid ads clearly, distinguishing them from regular search results, as well as limiting the number of paid ads on each page.

Some search results include illegal contents like rumors, obscenity, violence, homicide and terror; some search results lack objectivity and fairness, which violates the corporate moral standards, misleads and affects public judgment, the official said.

It also had said the amount of money an advertiser has paid to the search engine shouldn t factor into search results.

On Sunday, Baidu President Zhang Yaqin said on a World Economic Forum panel in the northern Chinese city of Tianjin that following Baidu s crisis in the last six months, the company is working on rebuilding trust.

David Erb 2021-07-12
img

More crackdowns on tech companies planning an IPO, as foreshadowed by the Cyberspace Administration of China

The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) has announced further restrictions for Chinese tech companies, including a compulsory security audit for companies with more than one million registered users that plan to list overseas.…

James Maloch 2021-07-02
img
The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) said on its website that Didi was not allowed to register new users during its investigation
Brian Christy 2021-07-06
img
The ride-hailing giant's app was ordered to be removed from mobile app stores in China on Sunday by the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) which followed an official investigation into the company's handling of customer data
James Williams 2016-07-05
img

In another move to censor and control the media, the Cyberspace Administration of China has moved to crack down on news reports that use information on social media.

The Chinese government says this is an attempt to stop the spread of false news, but it s obviously another move by the government to control public opinion.

According to The New York Times, the Cyberspace Administration of China issued a statement saying It is strictly forbidden for websites not to specify or to falsify news sources and to use hearsay to create news or use conjecture and imagination to distort the facts, and that they plan to punish more news outlets and websites that directly as news reports unverified content found on online platforms such as social media.

And according to the South China Morning Post, online outlets must get approval from the government before reporting news found on social media.

The Cyberspace Administration statement said that the agency had punished multiple Chinese news websites, but didn t give any details about how exactly these outlets were punished.

Here are three examples of stories deemed to be untrue by the Chinese Government, according to the NYT:

Thomas Saysongkham 2018-09-27
img

China shuts down American-listed news site Phoenix New Media over ‘illegal’ coverage – SCMP

What happened: The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) has ordered Phoenix New Media’s news portal ifeng.com to shut down its technology channel for a month and suspend its general news, financial news, mobile website, and app for two weeks.

The internet regulator said the site had “disseminated illegal and harmful information, distorted news headlines and shared news information in violation of rules”, and ordered it to undergo “thorough and in-depth rectification”.

Why it’s important: Online content providers, including news services and entertainment platforms, have faced increasing scrutiny from government departments.

Short video platforms have been targeted for hosting “inappropriate” content in an effort to increase government controls over cultural content.

ifeng.com’s suspension comes a week after CAC chief Zhuang Rongwen promised to further extend control over online spaces, saying “positive energy” should be promoted, while “negative elements” should be suppressed.

Edward Hudson 2019-01-11
img

China imposes blockchain rules to enable ‘orderly development’ – Reuters

What happened: The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) has released the finalized regulations concerning blockchain information service providers, which will come into effect on February 15.

Under the new regulations, which consist of 23 articles, blockchain companies will be required to implement real-name registration, maintain correspondence with authorities, and provide relevant information as requested.

Why it’s important: Chinese authorities first proposed the draft regulations last October in a bid to increase control over the burgeoning blockchain industry.

Though the government claims to be a blockchain proponent, it has cracked down on cryptocurrencies, initial coin offerings (ICOs), and exchange services since 2017.

The move against cryptocurrencies has driven away many homegrown exchanges and wallet services.

Robert Rock 2018-10-22
img

China requires blockchain-based information service providers to register users using real names, censor postings and store user data–South China Morning Post

What happened: Last Friday, the Cyberspace Administration of China released the first draft of a set of regulations that could substantially restrict blockchain development within the country.

Under the proposed regulations, which have been released for public consultation until November 2, blockchain-based service providers in China would require all users to register their real names and state ID numbers.

Providers would also be responsible for censoring content that poses a risk to national security, and make user data available for government inspection.

It is currently unclear when the regulations would be instated, if at all.

Why it’s important: Although the rules are still under development, they indicate China’s continued attempt to regulate blockchain-related enterprises within the country.

Ronald Griffis 2017-08-16
img

China is planning four to six “world-renowned” cybersecurity schools by 2027, as it ramps up its efforts to build a strong army of professionals to combat cyber attacks, in an increasing digitalised world.

The Cyberspace Administration of China, the country’s top internet regulator, and the Ministry of Education said they will roll out the nationwide project over the next decade in order to create “internationally recognised and influential” schools for the training of cybersecurity talent.

The two are inviting Chinese universities, which have sizeable cybersecurity faculties, to sign up for the project.

Once the best have been chosen, they will be provided with policies and investment to remake themselves as leading cybersecurity schools, the Ministry said in a notice published on it website on Tuesday.

The ambitious plan comes within three months of China’s new Cybersecurity Law, which came into effect on June 1, fuelling the need for top talent to better protect the country’s 751 million people who actively connect with the internet, via a social network, to their bank accounts.

The two authorities said they will explore the possibilities of setting up juvenile classes too for children who show gifted skills in cybersecurity, as well as improving current training programmes for those who study cybersecurity in colleges and graduate schools.