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Frank Wilkerson 2017-05-10

p What's it like to poke, prod, and blow up stuff for a living?

We'll find out from Norman Chan, our guest for Episode 13 of Ars Technica Live.

His photo of "VR Face" has been seen by millions around the world.

He'll be in conversation with Ars Technica Editors Annalee Newitz and Cyrus Farivar.

Filmed before a live audience, each episode of Ars Technica Live is a speculative, informal conversation between Ars hosts and an invited guest.

The audience is invited to join the conversation and ask questions.

collect
0
Donald Mansour 2016-05-21
img

We also liked some of the clothing and craft wares, like cool kids' hoodies, and these gorgeous earthenware.

If you're at all interested and you're anywhere near the Bay Area, the event continues Saturday and Sunday—it's well worth the price of admission.

Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%00:00The ScenePlayMute00:00Current Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00FullscreenNeed TextNo compatible source was found for this video.Advertisement 0:30Maker Faire Bay Area 2016: battle bots, drawing machines, and drone racesshareplaysaveI am a skip button.

WHOOPS!

We're sorry, something went wrong.

Listing image by Cyrus Farivar

collect
0
Steven Jones 2018-08-01
img

Robin Sloan writes about machine learning, but he's writing with it, too.

His 2017 novel Sourdough has been hailed as one of the best and most accurate novels about machine learning ever published.

In the wake of that book, Robin also built a little bot that will help you write science fiction by autocompleting your sentences with phrases taken from a massive corpus of sci-fi stories.

At the next Ars Technica Live, we'll be talking to Robin about the reality and fantasy of machine learning, as well as what it means to write in the age of bots.

Join Ars Technica's editor-at-large Annalee Newitz and senior editor Cyrus Farivar in conversation with Robin on August 8 at Eli's Mile High Club in Oakland.

There will be plenty of time for audience questions, too.

collect
0
William Ewing 2017-04-13
img

How does a city like Oakland deal with real crime issues while not repeating the past excesses of police surveillance?

Our guest for Episode 12 of Ars Technica Live, happening next Wednesday, April 19, is Bruce Stoffmacher of the Oakland Police Department.

Prior to working for the Oakland PD, he was a policy analyst in the mayor's office.

Stoffmacher currently works as the Legislation Manager for the Oakland PD, where he works with the Office of the City Attorney, Controller's Bureau, and City Administration to pass legislation in support of contracts, MOUs, budget priorities, and policies related to public safety strategies.

He writes City Council reports, legislation, and grants, and he supports diverse communication and partnership efforts.

Stoffmacher will be in conversation with Ars Senior Policy Editor David Kravets and Senior Business Editor Cyrus Farivar.

collect
0
George Summers 2017-08-09
img

Anyone who has been in the Bay Area in recent years knows that the tech industry plays an outsized role in our daily lives.

That's why Catherine Bracy has created a new Oakland-based organization, the TechEquity Collaborative, which organizes the tech community to advocate for policy changes that will ensure the region's tech-driven economy works for everyone.

Join Ars Technica editors Annalee Newitz and Cyrus Farivar next Wednesday, 8/16, in conversation with Bracy at Ars Technica Live, at Eli's Mile High Club in Oakland.

Bracy will discuss the work TechEquity is doing to enlist the tech industry to fix the region's inequality crisis, as well as her experiences at Code for America and Obama for America.

There will be plenty of time for audience questions, too.

Tickets are free, but please do RSVP with Eventbrite so you're guaranteed a spot.

collect
0
William Ewing 2018-05-08
img

The following is an excerpt of Habeas Data, which shows how the explosive growth of surveillance technology has outpaced our understanding of the ethics, mores, and laws of privacy.

Award-winning tech reporter Cyrus Farivar makes the case by taking ten historic court decisions that defined our privacy rights and matching them against the capabilities of modern technology.

It's comprised of wide Southern California streets, with at least two lanes of traffic (more if you include the left-turn lanes) in each quadrant.

Along the southwest corner is El Real Mexican Food, a single-story green-and-white building with a small balcony.

The young man complied and started to reach for his right pocket—Dunnigan barked at him to stop.

The gang claims turf in this particular neighborhood of southeastern San Diego, squarely a historic African-American neighborhood that had been subjected to redlining decades earlier.

collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2016-10-13
img

Join us in Oakland, California, for a conversation with Ariel Waldman about humanity's future in space.

The seventh episode of Ars Technica Live is coming up next week, October 20, in Oakland, California, at Longitude!

Join Ars Technica editors Cyrus Farivar and Annalee Newitz with guest Ariel Waldman for a conversation about what it's like in space and how we'll get there.

Ariel is the founder of Spacehack.org, a directory of ways to participate in space exploration, and the global director of Science Hack Day, a 20-countries-and-growing grassroots endeavor to make things with science.

: Stories from Astronauts Who ve Been There and the co-author of a congressionally requested National Academy of Sciences study on the future of human spaceflight.

She sits on the council for NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts NIAC , a program that nurtures radical, sci-fi-esque ideas that could transform future space missions.

collect
0
Charles Michels 2016-08-10
img

The fifth episode of Ars Technica Live is coming up next Wednesday, August 17, in Oakland, California, at Longitude!

Join Ars Technica editors Cyrus Farivar and Annalee Newitz, with guest Leslie Miley, for a conversation about Silicon Valley's problems with diversity.

In 2015, Miley was the only black engineer at Twitter in a leadership position, and he wrote a widely circulated article about his experiences.

Now a director of engineering at Slack, Miley has continued to be an advocate for diversity in tech.

Miley formerly worked in leadership roles at Apple and Google and serves as an adviser to several startups founded by women and minorities.

Filmed before a live audience at Oakland tiki bar Longitude, each episode of Ars Technica Live is a speculative, informal conversation between Ars Technica hosts and an invited guest.

collect
0
Joseph White 2019-01-03
img

Data breaches at hotels, banks, rideshare companies, and hospitals.

We're living through the data privacy apocalypse, and it's time to figure out what happens next.

Recently, Soltani testified before the US and UK governments about Facebook's privacy practices and how they make user data available to third parties.

Soltani also authored the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, which regulates large companies that make more than 50 percent of their revenues from selling California residents' personal information.

Soltani will be in conversation with Ars Technica editors Cyrus Farivar and Annalee Newitz.

Soltani previously served a brief stint as a senior advisor to the US chief technology officer in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and as the chief technologist for the Federal Trade Commission, advising the commission on its technology-related policy as well as helping to create its new Office of Technology Research and Investigation.

collect
0
Jose Rhoades 2016-10-01
img

Ordinary Americans are so economically pressed that they must commute some three hours to work as independent contractor chauffeurs for companies that do not provide basic benefits.

Not even those easing the driver's burden of staying overnight in cheap boarding houses before traveling back to their homelands with what profits they manage to muster.

The companies, meanwhile, consider this "very cool!"

This real-life parable begins with Cyrus Farivar, aneditor at Ars Technica, prolific Twitter user and Lyft passenger.

While on a Lyft ride Friday, Farivar tweeted that his current driver commutes from Fresno to the Bay Area, a trip that takes about three hours by car, ostensibly to drive in a place with more potential passengers.

This particular time, Fariver tweeted, his driver was even staying overnight in a hostel — which, as any backpacker knows, isn't exactly some cushy corporate accommodation.

collect
0
Jonathan Godbey 2016-12-29
img

Cyrus Farivar left and Annalee Newitz right interview law professor Elizabeth Joh about surveillance.

It's hard to look serious with tiki furniture everywhere, but we managed.

We were hosting an Ars meetup at Longitude, a fantastic tiki bar in Oakland, California, when the event turned into , the creator of the futuristic Creole language spoken by Belters in series on Syfy.

On the third Wednesday of every month, we returned to Longitude to interview interesting people who work at the intersection of technology, science, and culture.

We talked to law professor Elizabeth Joh about the future of surveillance, and we talked to anthropologist Krish Seetah about the history of meat eating in human culture.

Computer security researcher Morgan Marquis-Boire told us about defending journalists against state hackers, and space activist Ariel Waldman explained her role on the National Academy of Sciences .

collect
0
Everett Toliver 2017-10-11
img

What’s it like to work as a professional geek in Hollywood?

Find out from Gary Whitta, who started as a humble gamer and became the co-writer of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

Along the way, he worked on movies with Will Smith and Denzel Washington and helped create a Walking Dead game.

Join Ars Technica editors Cyrus Farivar and Annalee Newitz in conversation with Gary Whitta at the next Ars Technica Live on October 18 at Eli's Mile High Club in Oakland.

Gary is the former Editor-in-Chief of PC Gamer magazine and now an award-winning screenwriter and author, best known as the co-writer of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

He also wrote the post-apocalyptic thriller The Book of Eli starring Denzel Washington, co-wrote the Will Smith sci-fi adventure After Earth, and served as writer and story consultant on Telltale Games’ adaptation of The Walking Dead, for which he was the co-recipient of a BAFTA award for Best Story.

collect
0
Blaine Pilgrim 2017-11-08
img

With the DOJ recently bringing back the "Going Dark" debate and now calling for "responsible encryption," what does the Trump administration have to say about strong crypto?

If there's anyone who might be able to figure that out, it's Riana Pfefferkorn.

As an attorney and legal fellow, Pfefferkorn is at the forefront of trying to make sense of new technology, surveillance policy, and the thorny legal questions that emerge.

She'll explain how this problem emerged and what the FBI has already done about it over the last decade.

Join Ars Technica editors Cyrus Farivar and Annalee Newitz in conversation with Riana Pfefferkorn at the next Ars Technica Live on November 15 at Eli's Mile High Club in Oakland.

Her work focuses on investigating and analyzing the US government's policy and practices for forcing decryption and/or influencing crypto-related design of online platforms and services, devices, and products, both via technical means and through the courts and legislatures.

collect
0
Thomas Owens 2018-11-29
img

Facebook considered charging app developers for access to Facebook user data, according to unredacted court filings from an ongoing legal dispute between the social media company and an app developer.

The court filings, which The Wall Street Journal first reported, detail a series of emails between Facebook employees from 2012 through 2014 discussing ways they could charge developers for access to user data.

At one point, a Facebook staffer suggested app developers that do not spend at least $250,000 a year on Facebook should lose access to user data.

The revelations contained in the filings, however, underscore how Facebook considered leveraging its data troves behind the scenes to bring in more revenue.

The information contained in the lawsuit has fed into ongoing concerns about how Facebook has approached data security and privacy.

The court documents are part of a lawsuit brought by app developer Six4Three, a maker of a now-defunct app that allowed users to locate pictures of Facebook users in bikinis.

collect
0
Wayne Konwinski 2018-11-08
img

Just a week after thousands of Google employees worldwide protested the company’s inadequate response to sexual harassment, CEO Sundar Pichai announced that the company would agree to the first of the organizers’ demands: ending mandatory arbitration in sexual harassment cases.

Thousands of Google employees slam execs’ response to sexual misconduct

Pichai released a public memo in which he said that arbitration, a quasi-legal private dispute resolution process that often favors corporations over individuals, would now be "optional for individual sexual harassment and sexual assault claims."

"Google has never required confidentiality in the arbitration process and arbitration still may be the best path for a number of reasons (e.g.

personal privacy) but, we recognize that choice should be up to you," he wrote.

The company also said in a longer document that it would be changing the way it conducts internal investigations, noting that there would now be a "global process that will allow Googlers to be accompanied by a companion during an HR investigation, or when raising/reporting any harassment or discrimination concerns to HR."

collect
0
Dwight Black 2018-06-03
img

OAKLAND, Calif.—On the sidelines of the recent Code for America summit held at a downtown Marriott, Matt Cutts has a pitch to the legions of coders and other tech workers of America: your country needs you.

Cutts is the current acting administrator of the United States Digital Service—a federal agency that is basically the federal government’s friendly IT staff.

It works with everyone from the Department of Defense to the Department of Agriculture as a way to make government websites and online services work better.

Remember the disastrous rollout of healthcare.gov?

Cutts has been in the job since the first day of the Trump administration, as he was the deputy left in the big chair when his boss' term ran out.

The president has yet to appoint a new administrator, which means that Cutts is in charge of this 180-person agency.

collect
0
Frank Wilkerson 2017-05-10

p What's it like to poke, prod, and blow up stuff for a living?

We'll find out from Norman Chan, our guest for Episode 13 of Ars Technica Live.

His photo of "VR Face" has been seen by millions around the world.

He'll be in conversation with Ars Technica Editors Annalee Newitz and Cyrus Farivar.

Filmed before a live audience, each episode of Ars Technica Live is a speculative, informal conversation between Ars hosts and an invited guest.

The audience is invited to join the conversation and ask questions.

Steven Jones 2018-08-01
img

Robin Sloan writes about machine learning, but he's writing with it, too.

His 2017 novel Sourdough has been hailed as one of the best and most accurate novels about machine learning ever published.

In the wake of that book, Robin also built a little bot that will help you write science fiction by autocompleting your sentences with phrases taken from a massive corpus of sci-fi stories.

At the next Ars Technica Live, we'll be talking to Robin about the reality and fantasy of machine learning, as well as what it means to write in the age of bots.

Join Ars Technica's editor-at-large Annalee Newitz and senior editor Cyrus Farivar in conversation with Robin on August 8 at Eli's Mile High Club in Oakland.

There will be plenty of time for audience questions, too.

George Summers 2017-08-09
img

Anyone who has been in the Bay Area in recent years knows that the tech industry plays an outsized role in our daily lives.

That's why Catherine Bracy has created a new Oakland-based organization, the TechEquity Collaborative, which organizes the tech community to advocate for policy changes that will ensure the region's tech-driven economy works for everyone.

Join Ars Technica editors Annalee Newitz and Cyrus Farivar next Wednesday, 8/16, in conversation with Bracy at Ars Technica Live, at Eli's Mile High Club in Oakland.

Bracy will discuss the work TechEquity is doing to enlist the tech industry to fix the region's inequality crisis, as well as her experiences at Code for America and Obama for America.

There will be plenty of time for audience questions, too.

Tickets are free, but please do RSVP with Eventbrite so you're guaranteed a spot.

Lamont Shaw 2016-10-13
img

Join us in Oakland, California, for a conversation with Ariel Waldman about humanity's future in space.

The seventh episode of Ars Technica Live is coming up next week, October 20, in Oakland, California, at Longitude!

Join Ars Technica editors Cyrus Farivar and Annalee Newitz with guest Ariel Waldman for a conversation about what it's like in space and how we'll get there.

Ariel is the founder of Spacehack.org, a directory of ways to participate in space exploration, and the global director of Science Hack Day, a 20-countries-and-growing grassroots endeavor to make things with science.

: Stories from Astronauts Who ve Been There and the co-author of a congressionally requested National Academy of Sciences study on the future of human spaceflight.

She sits on the council for NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts NIAC , a program that nurtures radical, sci-fi-esque ideas that could transform future space missions.

Joseph White 2019-01-03
img

Data breaches at hotels, banks, rideshare companies, and hospitals.

We're living through the data privacy apocalypse, and it's time to figure out what happens next.

Recently, Soltani testified before the US and UK governments about Facebook's privacy practices and how they make user data available to third parties.

Soltani also authored the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, which regulates large companies that make more than 50 percent of their revenues from selling California residents' personal information.

Soltani will be in conversation with Ars Technica editors Cyrus Farivar and Annalee Newitz.

Soltani previously served a brief stint as a senior advisor to the US chief technology officer in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and as the chief technologist for the Federal Trade Commission, advising the commission on its technology-related policy as well as helping to create its new Office of Technology Research and Investigation.

Jonathan Godbey 2016-12-29
img

Cyrus Farivar left and Annalee Newitz right interview law professor Elizabeth Joh about surveillance.

It's hard to look serious with tiki furniture everywhere, but we managed.

We were hosting an Ars meetup at Longitude, a fantastic tiki bar in Oakland, California, when the event turned into , the creator of the futuristic Creole language spoken by Belters in series on Syfy.

On the third Wednesday of every month, we returned to Longitude to interview interesting people who work at the intersection of technology, science, and culture.

We talked to law professor Elizabeth Joh about the future of surveillance, and we talked to anthropologist Krish Seetah about the history of meat eating in human culture.

Computer security researcher Morgan Marquis-Boire told us about defending journalists against state hackers, and space activist Ariel Waldman explained her role on the National Academy of Sciences .

Blaine Pilgrim 2017-11-08
img

With the DOJ recently bringing back the "Going Dark" debate and now calling for "responsible encryption," what does the Trump administration have to say about strong crypto?

If there's anyone who might be able to figure that out, it's Riana Pfefferkorn.

As an attorney and legal fellow, Pfefferkorn is at the forefront of trying to make sense of new technology, surveillance policy, and the thorny legal questions that emerge.

She'll explain how this problem emerged and what the FBI has already done about it over the last decade.

Join Ars Technica editors Cyrus Farivar and Annalee Newitz in conversation with Riana Pfefferkorn at the next Ars Technica Live on November 15 at Eli's Mile High Club in Oakland.

Her work focuses on investigating and analyzing the US government's policy and practices for forcing decryption and/or influencing crypto-related design of online platforms and services, devices, and products, both via technical means and through the courts and legislatures.

Wayne Konwinski 2018-11-08
img

Just a week after thousands of Google employees worldwide protested the company’s inadequate response to sexual harassment, CEO Sundar Pichai announced that the company would agree to the first of the organizers’ demands: ending mandatory arbitration in sexual harassment cases.

Thousands of Google employees slam execs’ response to sexual misconduct

Pichai released a public memo in which he said that arbitration, a quasi-legal private dispute resolution process that often favors corporations over individuals, would now be "optional for individual sexual harassment and sexual assault claims."

"Google has never required confidentiality in the arbitration process and arbitration still may be the best path for a number of reasons (e.g.

personal privacy) but, we recognize that choice should be up to you," he wrote.

The company also said in a longer document that it would be changing the way it conducts internal investigations, noting that there would now be a "global process that will allow Googlers to be accompanied by a companion during an HR investigation, or when raising/reporting any harassment or discrimination concerns to HR."

Donald Mansour 2016-05-21
img

We also liked some of the clothing and craft wares, like cool kids' hoodies, and these gorgeous earthenware.

If you're at all interested and you're anywhere near the Bay Area, the event continues Saturday and Sunday—it's well worth the price of admission.

Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%00:00The ScenePlayMute00:00Current Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00FullscreenNeed TextNo compatible source was found for this video.Advertisement 0:30Maker Faire Bay Area 2016: battle bots, drawing machines, and drone racesshareplaysaveI am a skip button.

WHOOPS!

We're sorry, something went wrong.

Listing image by Cyrus Farivar

William Ewing 2017-04-13
img

How does a city like Oakland deal with real crime issues while not repeating the past excesses of police surveillance?

Our guest for Episode 12 of Ars Technica Live, happening next Wednesday, April 19, is Bruce Stoffmacher of the Oakland Police Department.

Prior to working for the Oakland PD, he was a policy analyst in the mayor's office.

Stoffmacher currently works as the Legislation Manager for the Oakland PD, where he works with the Office of the City Attorney, Controller's Bureau, and City Administration to pass legislation in support of contracts, MOUs, budget priorities, and policies related to public safety strategies.

He writes City Council reports, legislation, and grants, and he supports diverse communication and partnership efforts.

Stoffmacher will be in conversation with Ars Senior Policy Editor David Kravets and Senior Business Editor Cyrus Farivar.

William Ewing 2018-05-08
img

The following is an excerpt of Habeas Data, which shows how the explosive growth of surveillance technology has outpaced our understanding of the ethics, mores, and laws of privacy.

Award-winning tech reporter Cyrus Farivar makes the case by taking ten historic court decisions that defined our privacy rights and matching them against the capabilities of modern technology.

It's comprised of wide Southern California streets, with at least two lanes of traffic (more if you include the left-turn lanes) in each quadrant.

Along the southwest corner is El Real Mexican Food, a single-story green-and-white building with a small balcony.

The young man complied and started to reach for his right pocket—Dunnigan barked at him to stop.

The gang claims turf in this particular neighborhood of southeastern San Diego, squarely a historic African-American neighborhood that had been subjected to redlining decades earlier.

Charles Michels 2016-08-10
img

The fifth episode of Ars Technica Live is coming up next Wednesday, August 17, in Oakland, California, at Longitude!

Join Ars Technica editors Cyrus Farivar and Annalee Newitz, with guest Leslie Miley, for a conversation about Silicon Valley's problems with diversity.

In 2015, Miley was the only black engineer at Twitter in a leadership position, and he wrote a widely circulated article about his experiences.

Now a director of engineering at Slack, Miley has continued to be an advocate for diversity in tech.

Miley formerly worked in leadership roles at Apple and Google and serves as an adviser to several startups founded by women and minorities.

Filmed before a live audience at Oakland tiki bar Longitude, each episode of Ars Technica Live is a speculative, informal conversation between Ars Technica hosts and an invited guest.

Jose Rhoades 2016-10-01
img

Ordinary Americans are so economically pressed that they must commute some three hours to work as independent contractor chauffeurs for companies that do not provide basic benefits.

Not even those easing the driver's burden of staying overnight in cheap boarding houses before traveling back to their homelands with what profits they manage to muster.

The companies, meanwhile, consider this "very cool!"

This real-life parable begins with Cyrus Farivar, aneditor at Ars Technica, prolific Twitter user and Lyft passenger.

While on a Lyft ride Friday, Farivar tweeted that his current driver commutes from Fresno to the Bay Area, a trip that takes about three hours by car, ostensibly to drive in a place with more potential passengers.

This particular time, Fariver tweeted, his driver was even staying overnight in a hostel — which, as any backpacker knows, isn't exactly some cushy corporate accommodation.

Everett Toliver 2017-10-11
img

What’s it like to work as a professional geek in Hollywood?

Find out from Gary Whitta, who started as a humble gamer and became the co-writer of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

Along the way, he worked on movies with Will Smith and Denzel Washington and helped create a Walking Dead game.

Join Ars Technica editors Cyrus Farivar and Annalee Newitz in conversation with Gary Whitta at the next Ars Technica Live on October 18 at Eli's Mile High Club in Oakland.

Gary is the former Editor-in-Chief of PC Gamer magazine and now an award-winning screenwriter and author, best known as the co-writer of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

He also wrote the post-apocalyptic thriller The Book of Eli starring Denzel Washington, co-wrote the Will Smith sci-fi adventure After Earth, and served as writer and story consultant on Telltale Games’ adaptation of The Walking Dead, for which he was the co-recipient of a BAFTA award for Best Story.

Thomas Owens 2018-11-29
img

Facebook considered charging app developers for access to Facebook user data, according to unredacted court filings from an ongoing legal dispute between the social media company and an app developer.

The court filings, which The Wall Street Journal first reported, detail a series of emails between Facebook employees from 2012 through 2014 discussing ways they could charge developers for access to user data.

At one point, a Facebook staffer suggested app developers that do not spend at least $250,000 a year on Facebook should lose access to user data.

The revelations contained in the filings, however, underscore how Facebook considered leveraging its data troves behind the scenes to bring in more revenue.

The information contained in the lawsuit has fed into ongoing concerns about how Facebook has approached data security and privacy.

The court documents are part of a lawsuit brought by app developer Six4Three, a maker of a now-defunct app that allowed users to locate pictures of Facebook users in bikinis.

Dwight Black 2018-06-03
img

OAKLAND, Calif.—On the sidelines of the recent Code for America summit held at a downtown Marriott, Matt Cutts has a pitch to the legions of coders and other tech workers of America: your country needs you.

Cutts is the current acting administrator of the United States Digital Service—a federal agency that is basically the federal government’s friendly IT staff.

It works with everyone from the Department of Defense to the Department of Agriculture as a way to make government websites and online services work better.

Remember the disastrous rollout of healthcare.gov?

Cutts has been in the job since the first day of the Trump administration, as he was the deputy left in the big chair when his boss' term ran out.

The president has yet to appoint a new administrator, which means that Cutts is in charge of this 180-person agency.