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Jimmy Richmond 2020-09-14
(Dartmouth College) Phone data such as social activity, screen time and location can predict connectivity between regions of the brain that are responsible for emotion.
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0
Janet Gaines 2021-03-01
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(Dartmouth College) This new tool uses an artificial intelligence system to generate fake documents that foil IP theft by fooling adversaries
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0
Jennifer Ervin 2020-07-24
(Dartmouth College) New software techniques make lighting in computer-generated images look more realistic for use in video games, extended reality, and scientific visualization tools.
collect
0
Compare Closing LLC 2021-11-01

According to a new report by the personal finance website, WalletHub which collated data on various data like mass shootings, hate crimes, COVID-19 death rates, and natural disasters, Vermont, Maine, and New Hampshire has been elected the three safest states in the US.50 states were compared across five key areas:1 — Personal and residential safety 2 — Homicides and assaults 3 — Income and debt data 4 — Road and workplace safety 5 — Preparedness for climate disastersOn a 100-point scale, Vermont scored the highest at 69.49, Maine followed with 66.24 points and New Hampshire scored 65.35The three states which came at the bottom, are Louisiana with a score of 33.18, Mississippi and Texas trailed close behind.It was noticed that all of the three best scoring states are located to the extreme northeast and border each other.With the pandemic causing about 375,000 deaths in the country last year it is still one of the biggest safety concerns to Americans.A panel of experts gave advice on ways to improve financial safety, they gave strategies to manage personal finances during difficult times and what could states do to reduce crime.Consumers were advised by Professor Roman Weil, of the University of Chicago, to pay off all credit card debts which will get people most financially safe.He suggests credit card debt if can be paid in full every month, then one should stop using debit cards.Because using credit cards increases one’s credit score whereas a debit card does not affect the credit score.Assistant professor Kareem Tannous, at Cabrini University, suggested investors, should diversify risk in different financial assets, like real estate, equities, bonds, and commodities.Associate professor of criminal justice at Mercer University, Lynn Tankersley, said that policymakers should address the root causes of crime that are unique to their constituents.If one lives in a tornado-prone area, consulting and associate director of safety and security at Dartmouth College, Douglas Babcock, suggested avoiding living in a flood zone or having a storm cellar.For reducing and preventing crime in the future Babcock, said a safe society having better socioeconomic and educational opportunities will be of immense help.Reference Source: MPAhttps://www.compareclosing.com/mortgagenews/the-safest-states-evaluated-across-diverse-data/

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0
James Finch 2021-06-29
(Dartmouth College) A process that uses heat to change the arrangement of molecular rings on a chemical chain creates 3D-printable gels with a variety of functional properties.
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0
Henry Lawrence 2016-05-20
img

The robot, created by current and former students of Dartmouth College, aims to help reduce the number of concussions experienced during practice.

Tackling was banned at Dartmouth College by coach Buddy Teevens in 2010.

But, thanks to a few passionate Dartmouth engineering students, a robot tackling dummy was created in the summer of 2015 for players to practice on instead.

By having a robot to tackle instead of a person, the Steelers hope to reduce the chances of concussing one of its own players.

"You realize it's fast when you have to catch up to it.

The robot was initially controlled by an iPhone app, but is now controlled using a controller from a radio controlled car.

collect
0
Michael Wadsworth 2017-10-20
img

HANOVER, N.H. - October 20, 2017 - A watch that works in multiple dimensions and a smart ring that provides calendar alerts are among the top technology Dartmouth College will bring to the 30th ACM User Interface Software and Technology Symposium (UIST 2017).

The research projects, products of Dartmouth's human computer interface lab, have been chosen by UIST 2017 to feature alongside some of the world's most innovative technology.

RetroShape: A Smart Watch that Takes Users into Another Dimension

Imagine viewing a video or playing a game on a smart watch and having the device provide feedback that allows you to feel a ball bounce or an asteroid explode.

Dartmouth's RetroShape does just that.

Seeking to improve the user experience with smart watches, RetroShape uses a shape-deforming watch back that allows the user to view and feel virtual objects.

collect
0
Brian Plymel 2020-10-08
(Dartmouth College) Winners of the annual speculative fiction awards program include a well-known writer and a debut author that help us explore the many imaginative alleyways of the spec-fic genre.
collect
0
Duane Harrison 2020-10-30
(Dartmouth College) This interactive fabric can identify items and find lost valuables. When an object or an object's status is determined, the fabric can trigger a desired action or prompt.
collect
0
Letha Byrd 2018-04-19

HANOVER, N.H. - APRIL 19, 2018 - Researchers from Dartmouth College will unveil developmental smartwatch technology at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI2018).

The watch innovations will be demonstrated during the event in Montreal, Canada running from April 21 through April 26.

The research is the latest on a long list of technical designs from Dartmouth's XDiscovery Lab that seek to increase the functionality of wearables while also adding to the overall user experience.

"Smartwatches help people access info 'on the fly,' but they are far from perfect," said Xing-Dong Yang, assistant professor of computer science at Dartmouth.

We look forward to presenting the future of this technology at CHI2018."

WrisText: One-handed wrist gestures for easy text entry

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0
Johnny Huff 2019-03-26
img

HANOVER, N.H. -- March 26, 2019 -- Xia Zhou, an associate professor of computer science at Dartmouth College, has been awarded the 2019 ACM SIGMOBILE RockStar award.

The award committee selected Zhou "in recognition of her outstanding early-career contributions and impact on our field: for multidisciplinary research examining unconventional wireless spectrum frequencies to build next-generation wireless systems and spearheading the field of 'visible light sensing,' which turns the ubiquitous light around us into a powerful medium that integrates data communication and human behavioral sensing."

"I sincerely thank the committee and the SIGMOBILE community for the award.

I could not have made it without the continuing support and inspirations from my mentors, colleagues, and students.

They are the real stars to me."

"Professor Zhou is an extraordinarily creative computer scientist who is continually looking to push the boundaries of mobile communication," said Dan Rockmore, associate dean for the sciences at Dartmouth College.

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0
John Ruybal 2016-06-21
img

Dartmouth just became the first national research university to graduate more women than men in the engineering department.

More women have been going into engineering in the last several years, according to the American Society for Engineering Education AASE , and women made up 37 percent of the class in Dartmouth s engineering school in 2015.

But women tipped the scales this year at whopping 54 percent at Dartmouth — 34 percent higher than the national average.

The move helped female students relate to successful mentors in the department and encouraged them to consider a career in engineering.

We ve been able to attract more students, and especially women, by letting them use engineering to solve real-world challenges, Helble said.

Women in Dartmouth s engineering program also tackled many unique projects, including improving medical devices, smartphone technology and new ways to reduce concussions from playing football.

collect
0
Jeremy Green 2017-11-22
img

HANOVER, N.H. - Nov. 22, 2017 - Inspired by the challenge to see how ideas are shared between nation's through their founding documents, researchers at Dartmouth College have constructed a big data, evolutionary taxonomy of the world's constitutions.

The analysis traces the textual ties that bind and has resulted in a mathematically-derived constitutional family tree.

Visuals included with the study reveal the evolution of constitutions and constitutional ideas, and provide a window into how nations share political concepts.

"If a new country arose tomorrow, it would not draft a constitution from scratch," said Daniel Rockmore, the William H. Neukom 1964 Distinguished Professor of Computational Science at Dartmouth College, "it would look around to see what other countries have done, especially those that it feels a close relationship with."

For decades, researchers have theorized that the evolution of national constitutions follow pathways similar to biological evolution.

The Dartmouth analysis demonstrates that the historical development of constitutions follows the Yule Process - a model in evolutionary dynamics that describes birth process.

collect
0
Randy Rowald 2017-11-09
img

In a bid to end poor wireless connectivity issues at home and other spaces, a group of researchers from Dartmouth College has developed a unique and affordable system that uses a 3D printed reflector wrapped in aluminium foil to direct signals to an area of choice.

According to a report in EurekAlert, the custom-built reflector, which is made of plastic and thin metal, essentially works as a signal-shaper.

It gives enhanced Wi-Fi control by limiting signals to the desired area — a room for instance — and cutting off radio wave transmission to other regions.

This, as the report notes, could not only help users enjoy enhanced Wi-Fi connectivity by drawing wireless signals away from signal-blocking walls and other obstructions, but can also help bolster the security level of the connection by limiting signal reception only to where the user wants.

In other words, you won't have to worry about sharing your connection with neighbours or others.

"Through this single solution, we address a number of challenges that plague wireless users," said Xia Zhou, an assistant professor of computer science at Dartmouth College.

collect
0
Calvin Zohn 2017-09-12

Sergey Bratus, Research Associate Professor of Computer Science, Dartmouth College, and Anna Shubina, Post-doctoral Associate in Computer Science, Dartmouth College write: The real issue is that today's web-based email systems are electronic minefields filled with demands and enticements to click and engage in an increasingly responsive and interactive online experience.

It's not just Gmail, Yahoo mail and similar services: Desktop-computer-based email programs like Outlook display messages in the same unsafe way.

Simply put, safe email is plain-text email -- showing only the plain words of the message exactly as they arrived, without embedded links or images.

Webmail is convenient for advertisers (and lets you write good-looking emails with images and nice fonts), but carries with it unnecessary -- and serious -- danger, because a webpage (or an email) can easily show one thing but do another.

Returning email to its origins in plain text may seem radical, but it provides radically better security.

Even the federal government's top cybersecurity experts have come to the startling, but important, conclusion that any person, organization or government serious about web security should return to plain-text email (PDF).

collect
0
Bill Davis 2021-02-03
(Dartmouth College) In the Namib Desert in southwestern Africa, the Kuiseb River, an ephemeral river which is dry most of the year, plays a vital role to the region. It provides most of the vegetation to the area and serves as a home for the local indigenous people, and migration corridor for many animals. The overall vegetation cover increased by 33% between 1984 and 2019, according to a Dartmouth study published in Remote Sensing.
collect
0
Jimmy Richmond 2020-09-14
(Dartmouth College) Phone data such as social activity, screen time and location can predict connectivity between regions of the brain that are responsible for emotion.
Jennifer Ervin 2020-07-24
(Dartmouth College) New software techniques make lighting in computer-generated images look more realistic for use in video games, extended reality, and scientific visualization tools.
James Finch 2021-06-29
(Dartmouth College) A process that uses heat to change the arrangement of molecular rings on a chemical chain creates 3D-printable gels with a variety of functional properties.
Michael Wadsworth 2017-10-20
img

HANOVER, N.H. - October 20, 2017 - A watch that works in multiple dimensions and a smart ring that provides calendar alerts are among the top technology Dartmouth College will bring to the 30th ACM User Interface Software and Technology Symposium (UIST 2017).

The research projects, products of Dartmouth's human computer interface lab, have been chosen by UIST 2017 to feature alongside some of the world's most innovative technology.

RetroShape: A Smart Watch that Takes Users into Another Dimension

Imagine viewing a video or playing a game on a smart watch and having the device provide feedback that allows you to feel a ball bounce or an asteroid explode.

Dartmouth's RetroShape does just that.

Seeking to improve the user experience with smart watches, RetroShape uses a shape-deforming watch back that allows the user to view and feel virtual objects.

Duane Harrison 2020-10-30
(Dartmouth College) This interactive fabric can identify items and find lost valuables. When an object or an object's status is determined, the fabric can trigger a desired action or prompt.
Johnny Huff 2019-03-26
img

HANOVER, N.H. -- March 26, 2019 -- Xia Zhou, an associate professor of computer science at Dartmouth College, has been awarded the 2019 ACM SIGMOBILE RockStar award.

The award committee selected Zhou "in recognition of her outstanding early-career contributions and impact on our field: for multidisciplinary research examining unconventional wireless spectrum frequencies to build next-generation wireless systems and spearheading the field of 'visible light sensing,' which turns the ubiquitous light around us into a powerful medium that integrates data communication and human behavioral sensing."

"I sincerely thank the committee and the SIGMOBILE community for the award.

I could not have made it without the continuing support and inspirations from my mentors, colleagues, and students.

They are the real stars to me."

"Professor Zhou is an extraordinarily creative computer scientist who is continually looking to push the boundaries of mobile communication," said Dan Rockmore, associate dean for the sciences at Dartmouth College.

Jeremy Green 2017-11-22
img

HANOVER, N.H. - Nov. 22, 2017 - Inspired by the challenge to see how ideas are shared between nation's through their founding documents, researchers at Dartmouth College have constructed a big data, evolutionary taxonomy of the world's constitutions.

The analysis traces the textual ties that bind and has resulted in a mathematically-derived constitutional family tree.

Visuals included with the study reveal the evolution of constitutions and constitutional ideas, and provide a window into how nations share political concepts.

"If a new country arose tomorrow, it would not draft a constitution from scratch," said Daniel Rockmore, the William H. Neukom 1964 Distinguished Professor of Computational Science at Dartmouth College, "it would look around to see what other countries have done, especially those that it feels a close relationship with."

For decades, researchers have theorized that the evolution of national constitutions follow pathways similar to biological evolution.

The Dartmouth analysis demonstrates that the historical development of constitutions follows the Yule Process - a model in evolutionary dynamics that describes birth process.

Calvin Zohn 2017-09-12

Sergey Bratus, Research Associate Professor of Computer Science, Dartmouth College, and Anna Shubina, Post-doctoral Associate in Computer Science, Dartmouth College write: The real issue is that today's web-based email systems are electronic minefields filled with demands and enticements to click and engage in an increasingly responsive and interactive online experience.

It's not just Gmail, Yahoo mail and similar services: Desktop-computer-based email programs like Outlook display messages in the same unsafe way.

Simply put, safe email is plain-text email -- showing only the plain words of the message exactly as they arrived, without embedded links or images.

Webmail is convenient for advertisers (and lets you write good-looking emails with images and nice fonts), but carries with it unnecessary -- and serious -- danger, because a webpage (or an email) can easily show one thing but do another.

Returning email to its origins in plain text may seem radical, but it provides radically better security.

Even the federal government's top cybersecurity experts have come to the startling, but important, conclusion that any person, organization or government serious about web security should return to plain-text email (PDF).

Janet Gaines 2021-03-01
img
(Dartmouth College) This new tool uses an artificial intelligence system to generate fake documents that foil IP theft by fooling adversaries
Compare Closing LLC 2021-11-01

According to a new report by the personal finance website, WalletHub which collated data on various data like mass shootings, hate crimes, COVID-19 death rates, and natural disasters, Vermont, Maine, and New Hampshire has been elected the three safest states in the US.50 states were compared across five key areas:1 — Personal and residential safety 2 — Homicides and assaults 3 — Income and debt data 4 — Road and workplace safety 5 — Preparedness for climate disastersOn a 100-point scale, Vermont scored the highest at 69.49, Maine followed with 66.24 points and New Hampshire scored 65.35The three states which came at the bottom, are Louisiana with a score of 33.18, Mississippi and Texas trailed close behind.It was noticed that all of the three best scoring states are located to the extreme northeast and border each other.With the pandemic causing about 375,000 deaths in the country last year it is still one of the biggest safety concerns to Americans.A panel of experts gave advice on ways to improve financial safety, they gave strategies to manage personal finances during difficult times and what could states do to reduce crime.Consumers were advised by Professor Roman Weil, of the University of Chicago, to pay off all credit card debts which will get people most financially safe.He suggests credit card debt if can be paid in full every month, then one should stop using debit cards.Because using credit cards increases one’s credit score whereas a debit card does not affect the credit score.Assistant professor Kareem Tannous, at Cabrini University, suggested investors, should diversify risk in different financial assets, like real estate, equities, bonds, and commodities.Associate professor of criminal justice at Mercer University, Lynn Tankersley, said that policymakers should address the root causes of crime that are unique to their constituents.If one lives in a tornado-prone area, consulting and associate director of safety and security at Dartmouth College, Douglas Babcock, suggested avoiding living in a flood zone or having a storm cellar.For reducing and preventing crime in the future Babcock, said a safe society having better socioeconomic and educational opportunities will be of immense help.Reference Source: MPAhttps://www.compareclosing.com/mortgagenews/the-safest-states-evaluated-across-diverse-data/

Henry Lawrence 2016-05-20
img

The robot, created by current and former students of Dartmouth College, aims to help reduce the number of concussions experienced during practice.

Tackling was banned at Dartmouth College by coach Buddy Teevens in 2010.

But, thanks to a few passionate Dartmouth engineering students, a robot tackling dummy was created in the summer of 2015 for players to practice on instead.

By having a robot to tackle instead of a person, the Steelers hope to reduce the chances of concussing one of its own players.

"You realize it's fast when you have to catch up to it.

The robot was initially controlled by an iPhone app, but is now controlled using a controller from a radio controlled car.

Brian Plymel 2020-10-08
(Dartmouth College) Winners of the annual speculative fiction awards program include a well-known writer and a debut author that help us explore the many imaginative alleyways of the spec-fic genre.
Letha Byrd 2018-04-19

HANOVER, N.H. - APRIL 19, 2018 - Researchers from Dartmouth College will unveil developmental smartwatch technology at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI2018).

The watch innovations will be demonstrated during the event in Montreal, Canada running from April 21 through April 26.

The research is the latest on a long list of technical designs from Dartmouth's XDiscovery Lab that seek to increase the functionality of wearables while also adding to the overall user experience.

"Smartwatches help people access info 'on the fly,' but they are far from perfect," said Xing-Dong Yang, assistant professor of computer science at Dartmouth.

We look forward to presenting the future of this technology at CHI2018."

WrisText: One-handed wrist gestures for easy text entry

John Ruybal 2016-06-21
img

Dartmouth just became the first national research university to graduate more women than men in the engineering department.

More women have been going into engineering in the last several years, according to the American Society for Engineering Education AASE , and women made up 37 percent of the class in Dartmouth s engineering school in 2015.

But women tipped the scales this year at whopping 54 percent at Dartmouth — 34 percent higher than the national average.

The move helped female students relate to successful mentors in the department and encouraged them to consider a career in engineering.

We ve been able to attract more students, and especially women, by letting them use engineering to solve real-world challenges, Helble said.

Women in Dartmouth s engineering program also tackled many unique projects, including improving medical devices, smartphone technology and new ways to reduce concussions from playing football.

Randy Rowald 2017-11-09
img

In a bid to end poor wireless connectivity issues at home and other spaces, a group of researchers from Dartmouth College has developed a unique and affordable system that uses a 3D printed reflector wrapped in aluminium foil to direct signals to an area of choice.

According to a report in EurekAlert, the custom-built reflector, which is made of plastic and thin metal, essentially works as a signal-shaper.

It gives enhanced Wi-Fi control by limiting signals to the desired area — a room for instance — and cutting off radio wave transmission to other regions.

This, as the report notes, could not only help users enjoy enhanced Wi-Fi connectivity by drawing wireless signals away from signal-blocking walls and other obstructions, but can also help bolster the security level of the connection by limiting signal reception only to where the user wants.

In other words, you won't have to worry about sharing your connection with neighbours or others.

"Through this single solution, we address a number of challenges that plague wireless users," said Xia Zhou, an assistant professor of computer science at Dartmouth College.

Bill Davis 2021-02-03
(Dartmouth College) In the Namib Desert in southwestern Africa, the Kuiseb River, an ephemeral river which is dry most of the year, plays a vital role to the region. It provides most of the vegetation to the area and serves as a home for the local indigenous people, and migration corridor for many animals. The overall vegetation cover increased by 33% between 1984 and 2019, according to a Dartmouth study published in Remote Sensing.