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Lucas Castillo 2018-07-15
img

Instead, the $2.65 million vessel was named RRS Sir David Attenborough, a British broadcaster who pushed the button to launch the ship, the BBC reported.

“To see this magnificent hull with my name on it is the greatest possible honour,” Attenborough said, according to a British Antarctic Survey tweet.

Attenborough, 92, is a brother of the late filmmaker Richard Attenborough, director of "Gandhi," "Jurassic Park," and many other films, who died in 2014.

Jane Francis, director of the British Antarctic Survey, talked about why the ship was named for David Attenborough.

“This is a serious science ship that required the name of a serious scientist,” Francis said, according to the Guardian.

“Its name recognises all the love and esteem the British public holds for Sir David Attenborough.”

collect
0
Anthony Breedlove 2018-06-06
img

Back in March it was revealed that Sky had enlisted the help of David Attenborough to create a virtual reality learning experience, with the naturalist/TV presenter teaching users inside a virtual recreation of London's National History Museum.

Hold the World was made specifically for the relaunch of Sky's virtual reality app, and now that launch has arrived.

To commemorate the occasion, Sky strapped a headset onto Attenborough himself, so he could learn from his virtual counterpart.

In case you forgot, the whole thing was put together using over 100 cameras to create a realistic holographic version of the man himself rather than just plonking a 360-degree camera on the table while Attenborough was teaching you about fossils.

Hold the World is made up of several experience, each lasting between 20 and 60 minutes, with the option to change locations within the museum.

Sky VR is exclusive to Sky VIP customers, and is available on Android, iOS, Google Daydream, Oculus Rift, and Gear VR.

collect
0
Mark Moore 2021-01-13
img
AR hologram of David Attenborough, smart ports, and remote TV production all secure investment.
collect
0
Rafael Beltrami 2021-02-17
img

Sir David Attenborough has warned that human beings are destroying themselves by destroying the natural world.

The naturalist and broadcaster previously shared his worry that “people will take their eyes off the environmental issue” because of Covid-19.

Now, speaking on the Call Of The Wild podcast with Cel Spellman, the 94-year-old has said: “Human beings are all pervasive, everywhere… you can’t get away from human beings anymore. There are oil slicks and bits of plastic floating in the remotest part of the oceans. We have destroyed nature.

“We’ve been so clever that we’ve found methods and techniques of actually destroying nature in order to put in what we choose, and we’ve done it without thought over vast areas of the planet as though the planet belonged only to us.

“We depend on the natural world for interests, for everything that’s beautiful and wonderful. But also we depend on it for every breath of air we take and every mouthful of food we eat. And if we damage the natural world, we are damaging ourselves. And we have been doing that without care for decades.”

Asked for his tips on how to repair our relationship with nature, he said: “One of the simplest things that you should do if you get the chance, when you get the chance, is just naturally to stop.

“Sit down. Don’t move. Keep quiet. Wait 10 minutes. You’ll be very surprised if something pretty interesting didn’t happen within 10 minutes. Doing that in a woodland, if you haven’t done it, is extraordinary. Don’t get too impatient either.

“And then, speaking for myself, then you’ll realise how ignorant you are, how you can’t actually recognise what that birdcall is, which you ought to be able to, I certainly ought to be able to do.

“Mind you, I can’t hear either, my age, but, nonetheless, there are things to see and there are wonderful things to see and extraordinary things happen.

“The real time when it really is exciting to do that is if you do it in a place where you don’t know at all, I mean, you go into a jungle in the middle of Costa Rica or something, and then you suddenly see extraordinary things that you really don’t know anything about.”

Sir David Attenborough is on Call Of The Wild with Cel Spellman and WWF on Apple, Spotify and all podcast providers.

collect
0
James Mckinnis 2016-10-18
img

the Uk's new research vessel for the polar regions, the RRS Sir David Attenborough.

But to become the Uk's largest and most expensive research vessel for polarklimat.

On Monday, a ceremony was held at the shipyard Cammell Laird in Liverpool, when kölsträckningen took place.

in three years, moscow has been given the name RRS Sir David Attenborough is in use, and able to be used in both the Antarctic and the Arctic.

the Whole project is 200 million british pounds, which is just over sek 2.1 billion.

Then included the construction of a port in the Antarctic.

collect
0
Cornelius Jones 2016-07-21
img

Is there anything that could make Pokemon Go even more amazing?

Well, apart from servers that don t break all the time and fixes for the three step bug, that is.

It turns out there is one simple adjustment that could make it almost a million times more awesome - narration from everyone s favourite nature narrator.

The people at Lovin Dublin knocked together the above video, which shows a few clips of gameplay in the hottest new mobile app, all being described by David Attenborough.

Niantic, if you re reading - please try to fit this into the next update.

collect
0
Nicolas Yeager 2017-03-13

It’s become apparent this week that Boaty McBoatface, whose dreams of being a real boat have been dashed, will become an official British sea vessel anyway.

It was the year 2016 when the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) asked the internet to name their newest boat.

Of course, giving this campaign a public voting portal did not end how the council expected – but – BUT!

While Boaty McBoatface was chosen in the online poll, the Natural Environment Research Council dismissed it.

Instead, they chose the much more reasonable David Attenborough to name the boat after.

This vessel is still named the RSS Sir David Attenborough today.

collect
0
Timothy Corn 2020-08-03
img

Dave and Sir David Attenborough are teaming up to “lift viewers’ spirits” on a new episode of Planet Earth

The Brit Award-winning rapper will play the grand piano with the BBC Concert Orchestra for the soundtrack of Planet Earth: A Celebration. 

The TV special will be voiced by Sir David with the BBC saying it aims to cheer up viewers at “a time of international uncertainty”.

Dave and Sir David Attenborough

It will feature eight sequences of animals overcoming adversity taken from Planet Earth II and Blue Planet II.

Composer Hans Zimmer has created new compositions and rearranged the original scores.

Highlights will include the famous scene in which a newly-hatched marine iguana is chased by snakes, as well as an octopus fighting off a shark by pushing their arms into the gills to suffocate the predator.

Dave said of his involvement with the show: “I’ve always been a fan of powerful natural history documentaries. This is a programme where nature and music come together, so it was only right that I lent my talent, my time, and my attention to this project.

“It was a pleasure to work alongside Sir David Attenborough and Hans Zimmer.”

Dave and the orchestra were filmed for the programme in the Lyndhurst Hall at Air Studios, London.

Dave plays the grand piano with the BBC Concert Orchestra on the Planet Earth special

Orchestra director Andrew Connolly also said: “To bring the Concert Orchestra out of lockdown in order to create new music with Dave and Hans Zimmer for Planet Earth: A Celebration was very special, and that feeling of coming together is at the heart of our performance.”

BBC director general Lord Tony Hall added: “This thrilling journey around the world promises to lift everyone’s spirits.”

Planet Earth: A Celebration will air on BBC One later this year.  

collect
0
Frederick Jones 2016-10-17
img

Baby bro McBoatface will probe under ice sheets...

Construction for RRS Sir David Attenborough has formally begun after Sir David Attenborough kickstarted the opening ceremony by laying the ship s keel in Merseyside today.

The UK s £200m research ship will cruise around the polar regions to investigate the impacts climate change has on the oceans.

It is commissioned by the Natural Environment Research Council NERC .

Attenborough launched the traditional maritime keel-laying process by commencing the first 100-tonne hull unit to be lifted to the construction berth by crane.

Speaking at the ceremony, he said it was an honour to be invited to the keel-laying ceremony.

collect
0
Brian Christy 2018-06-28
img

Muralwatch Keen fans of Crap Murals were seen heading to Shoreditch this morning, as a new artwork celebrating "two of history's greatest minds" was unveiled.

"The enormous 200 square foot mural (that took 52 cans of spray paint to paint) has been created to pay homage to two of history's greatest minds, and to get people thinking 'what if they collaborated?'

in celebration of the opening of Mindspace, the global co-working operator, in Shoreditch," the PR company for the sponsor proclaimed.

One half of the mural depicts "national treasure" (in their words) David Attenborough.

While the other celebrates the late Jimmy Hill, football legend.

What would happen if Jimmy Hill and David Attenborough collaborated, we were musing, perhaps even speculating that they actually had.

collect
0
Isiah Jone 2018-02-19
img

David Attenborough is once again set to bang on about penguins and lions for the BBC, suggesting that he thinks people haven't been paying attention to anything he's said for the last 60 years or so and needs to do it all again.

Perhaps shouting this time or in VR.

The latest landmark BBC wildlife production is currently being assembled under the working title of Dynasty, seeing as each episode follows the lives of one particular group of animals with a focus on whichever beast is the dominant member of it's local pack, family or community.

The BBC says we can expect to hear about lions, chimps, tigers, hunting dogs and yet more banging on about the lives of emperor penguins, as if every man, woman and child in this country hasn't already spent at least 100 hours being told about what emperor penguins do and what their poo smells like by the BBC.

As with environmentally aware barnstormers Planet Earth II and Blue Planet II, there's going to be more than a passing nod in this series to mankind's anthropocene hand in making life extra hard for these species, with BBC specialist commissioner Tom McDonald saying: "I'm thrilled that Sir David will be bringing his extraordinary storytelling to this incredibly ambitious, landmark project -- a gripping portrait of our planet at a tipping point for the animals, their habitats and our world."

collect
0
James Manzo 2019-01-02
img

Sometimes we feel overwhelmed at how much there is to do to save our planet and ourselves but there are some really simple things, that we can all do, which can and will really make a difference.

Here some simple things you can do from your desk without even breaking a sweat.

Buy compact fluorescent light bulbs.

Turn off your appliances when not in use, even your PC, printer etc - and maybe use an energy saving outlet

Use an environmentally-conscious search engine, like Elliot For Water or Ecosia.

Stop using plastic straws and get paper or steel reusable straws

collect
0
James Hammond 2020-08-26
img
Another perfectly 2020 product.
collect
0
Mary Jones 2016-11-07
img

Just when it would have been safe to assume that the world is going to hell, a glimmer of hope: It turns out that despite everything, the general public still prefer David Attenborough to The X-Factor.

According to the BBC the series premiere of Planet Earth 2 easily saw off the ITV talent show banking an average of 9.2m viewers throughout the 8pm hour.

The best Simon Cowell could do, meanwhile was 6.5m.

These numbers are likely to narrow once catch-up viewers are taken into account.

If you're a an of wild speculation, we'd guess that Planet Earth appealed to older viewers - whereas younger X-Factor viewers are more likely to watch on demand after the fact.

But Planet Earth still has a significant lead.

collect
0
Jesse Rodriguez 2017-03-10

Sir David Attenborough’s remarkable life story has been added to the BBC’s Storytime educational app for children.

Your browser does not support the video tag.

Attenborough’s Adventures uses interactive stories to help children up to the age of six learn to read.

The naturalist and broadcaster has provided the narration, with stories covering everything from filming Zoo Quest in the 1950s right up to the 2016 project VR project Giant Dinosaur.

The first interactive story to go live on the app is David and the Gorilla Quest, which retells the remarkable moment in 1978 when Attenborough encountered mountain gorillas at Dian Fossey’s research site in Rwanda.

Children read and play along with the story and are asked to pack items for Attenborough’s expeditions to help him track the gorillas through the jungle.

collect
0
James Howard 2021-02-22
img
Sir David Attenborough

Sir David Attenborough is to warn world leaders that this year’s climate change talks are the last chance to prevent “runaway” global warming.

In a video address to the UN Security Council on Tuesday, the veteran broadcaster and naturalist will declare that the COP26 summit in Glasgow in November marks a key moment to avoid damage to the planet becoming “unstoppable”.

Attenborough has been invited to speak by Boris Johnson, who will chair the virtual meeting and will call on fellow leaders to tackle climate change to help avoid countries sliding into conflict over increasingly scarce natural resources.

The 94-year-old BBC broadcaster will tell the UN meeting: “If we bring emissions down with sufficient vigour we may yet avoid the tipping points that will make runaway climate change unstoppable.

“In November this year, at COP26 in Glasgow, we may have our last opportunity to make the necessary step-change.

“If we objectively view climate change and the loss of nature as world-wide security threats – as indeed, they are – then we may yet act proportionately and in time.”

The security council is currently made up of the UK, US, Russia, France and China, as well as India and Mexico.

Its latest session will be the first leader-level discussion it has held on climate, and is the first time it has been chaired by a British prime minister in nearly 30 years.

It comes as countries increasingly face the effects of rising temperatures and extreme weather, which is forcing populations to move and creating competition over increasingly scarce resources.

Of the 20 countries ranked most vulnerable to rising global temperatures, 12 are already in conflict, officials said.

Ahead of the meeting, Johnson said: “From the communities uprooted by extreme weather and hunger, to warlords capitalising on the scramble for resources – a warming planet is driving insecurity.

“Unlike many issues the security council deals with, this is one we know exactly how to address. By helping vulnerable countries adapt to climate change and cutting global emissions to net zero, we will protect not only the bountiful biodiversity of our planet, but its prosperity and security.”

Christian Aid’s climate policy lead, Dr Kat Kramer, added: “Millions of the world’s poorest people are already living with the impacts of climate change, which is forcing displacement, devastating livelihoods and putting pressure on communities who are competing over resources such as land and water.

“In some countries these impacts become the drivers of local conflicts which can be instrumentalised by leaders and escalate into violence and war.”

collect
0
Lucas Castillo 2018-07-15
img

Instead, the $2.65 million vessel was named RRS Sir David Attenborough, a British broadcaster who pushed the button to launch the ship, the BBC reported.

“To see this magnificent hull with my name on it is the greatest possible honour,” Attenborough said, according to a British Antarctic Survey tweet.

Attenborough, 92, is a brother of the late filmmaker Richard Attenborough, director of "Gandhi," "Jurassic Park," and many other films, who died in 2014.

Jane Francis, director of the British Antarctic Survey, talked about why the ship was named for David Attenborough.

“This is a serious science ship that required the name of a serious scientist,” Francis said, according to the Guardian.

“Its name recognises all the love and esteem the British public holds for Sir David Attenborough.”

Mark Moore 2021-01-13
img
AR hologram of David Attenborough, smart ports, and remote TV production all secure investment.
James Mckinnis 2016-10-18
img

the Uk's new research vessel for the polar regions, the RRS Sir David Attenborough.

But to become the Uk's largest and most expensive research vessel for polarklimat.

On Monday, a ceremony was held at the shipyard Cammell Laird in Liverpool, when kölsträckningen took place.

in three years, moscow has been given the name RRS Sir David Attenborough is in use, and able to be used in both the Antarctic and the Arctic.

the Whole project is 200 million british pounds, which is just over sek 2.1 billion.

Then included the construction of a port in the Antarctic.

Nicolas Yeager 2017-03-13

It’s become apparent this week that Boaty McBoatface, whose dreams of being a real boat have been dashed, will become an official British sea vessel anyway.

It was the year 2016 when the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) asked the internet to name their newest boat.

Of course, giving this campaign a public voting portal did not end how the council expected – but – BUT!

While Boaty McBoatface was chosen in the online poll, the Natural Environment Research Council dismissed it.

Instead, they chose the much more reasonable David Attenborough to name the boat after.

This vessel is still named the RSS Sir David Attenborough today.

Frederick Jones 2016-10-17
img

Baby bro McBoatface will probe under ice sheets...

Construction for RRS Sir David Attenborough has formally begun after Sir David Attenborough kickstarted the opening ceremony by laying the ship s keel in Merseyside today.

The UK s £200m research ship will cruise around the polar regions to investigate the impacts climate change has on the oceans.

It is commissioned by the Natural Environment Research Council NERC .

Attenborough launched the traditional maritime keel-laying process by commencing the first 100-tonne hull unit to be lifted to the construction berth by crane.

Speaking at the ceremony, he said it was an honour to be invited to the keel-laying ceremony.

Isiah Jone 2018-02-19
img

David Attenborough is once again set to bang on about penguins and lions for the BBC, suggesting that he thinks people haven't been paying attention to anything he's said for the last 60 years or so and needs to do it all again.

Perhaps shouting this time or in VR.

The latest landmark BBC wildlife production is currently being assembled under the working title of Dynasty, seeing as each episode follows the lives of one particular group of animals with a focus on whichever beast is the dominant member of it's local pack, family or community.

The BBC says we can expect to hear about lions, chimps, tigers, hunting dogs and yet more banging on about the lives of emperor penguins, as if every man, woman and child in this country hasn't already spent at least 100 hours being told about what emperor penguins do and what their poo smells like by the BBC.

As with environmentally aware barnstormers Planet Earth II and Blue Planet II, there's going to be more than a passing nod in this series to mankind's anthropocene hand in making life extra hard for these species, with BBC specialist commissioner Tom McDonald saying: "I'm thrilled that Sir David will be bringing his extraordinary storytelling to this incredibly ambitious, landmark project -- a gripping portrait of our planet at a tipping point for the animals, their habitats and our world."

James Hammond 2020-08-26
img
Another perfectly 2020 product.
Jesse Rodriguez 2017-03-10

Sir David Attenborough’s remarkable life story has been added to the BBC’s Storytime educational app for children.

Your browser does not support the video tag.

Attenborough’s Adventures uses interactive stories to help children up to the age of six learn to read.

The naturalist and broadcaster has provided the narration, with stories covering everything from filming Zoo Quest in the 1950s right up to the 2016 project VR project Giant Dinosaur.

The first interactive story to go live on the app is David and the Gorilla Quest, which retells the remarkable moment in 1978 when Attenborough encountered mountain gorillas at Dian Fossey’s research site in Rwanda.

Children read and play along with the story and are asked to pack items for Attenborough’s expeditions to help him track the gorillas through the jungle.

Anthony Breedlove 2018-06-06
img

Back in March it was revealed that Sky had enlisted the help of David Attenborough to create a virtual reality learning experience, with the naturalist/TV presenter teaching users inside a virtual recreation of London's National History Museum.

Hold the World was made specifically for the relaunch of Sky's virtual reality app, and now that launch has arrived.

To commemorate the occasion, Sky strapped a headset onto Attenborough himself, so he could learn from his virtual counterpart.

In case you forgot, the whole thing was put together using over 100 cameras to create a realistic holographic version of the man himself rather than just plonking a 360-degree camera on the table while Attenborough was teaching you about fossils.

Hold the World is made up of several experience, each lasting between 20 and 60 minutes, with the option to change locations within the museum.

Sky VR is exclusive to Sky VIP customers, and is available on Android, iOS, Google Daydream, Oculus Rift, and Gear VR.

Rafael Beltrami 2021-02-17
img

Sir David Attenborough has warned that human beings are destroying themselves by destroying the natural world.

The naturalist and broadcaster previously shared his worry that “people will take their eyes off the environmental issue” because of Covid-19.

Now, speaking on the Call Of The Wild podcast with Cel Spellman, the 94-year-old has said: “Human beings are all pervasive, everywhere… you can’t get away from human beings anymore. There are oil slicks and bits of plastic floating in the remotest part of the oceans. We have destroyed nature.

“We’ve been so clever that we’ve found methods and techniques of actually destroying nature in order to put in what we choose, and we’ve done it without thought over vast areas of the planet as though the planet belonged only to us.

“We depend on the natural world for interests, for everything that’s beautiful and wonderful. But also we depend on it for every breath of air we take and every mouthful of food we eat. And if we damage the natural world, we are damaging ourselves. And we have been doing that without care for decades.”

Asked for his tips on how to repair our relationship with nature, he said: “One of the simplest things that you should do if you get the chance, when you get the chance, is just naturally to stop.

“Sit down. Don’t move. Keep quiet. Wait 10 minutes. You’ll be very surprised if something pretty interesting didn’t happen within 10 minutes. Doing that in a woodland, if you haven’t done it, is extraordinary. Don’t get too impatient either.

“And then, speaking for myself, then you’ll realise how ignorant you are, how you can’t actually recognise what that birdcall is, which you ought to be able to, I certainly ought to be able to do.

“Mind you, I can’t hear either, my age, but, nonetheless, there are things to see and there are wonderful things to see and extraordinary things happen.

“The real time when it really is exciting to do that is if you do it in a place where you don’t know at all, I mean, you go into a jungle in the middle of Costa Rica or something, and then you suddenly see extraordinary things that you really don’t know anything about.”

Sir David Attenborough is on Call Of The Wild with Cel Spellman and WWF on Apple, Spotify and all podcast providers.

Cornelius Jones 2016-07-21
img

Is there anything that could make Pokemon Go even more amazing?

Well, apart from servers that don t break all the time and fixes for the three step bug, that is.

It turns out there is one simple adjustment that could make it almost a million times more awesome - narration from everyone s favourite nature narrator.

The people at Lovin Dublin knocked together the above video, which shows a few clips of gameplay in the hottest new mobile app, all being described by David Attenborough.

Niantic, if you re reading - please try to fit this into the next update.

Timothy Corn 2020-08-03
img

Dave and Sir David Attenborough are teaming up to “lift viewers’ spirits” on a new episode of Planet Earth

The Brit Award-winning rapper will play the grand piano with the BBC Concert Orchestra for the soundtrack of Planet Earth: A Celebration. 

The TV special will be voiced by Sir David with the BBC saying it aims to cheer up viewers at “a time of international uncertainty”.

Dave and Sir David Attenborough

It will feature eight sequences of animals overcoming adversity taken from Planet Earth II and Blue Planet II.

Composer Hans Zimmer has created new compositions and rearranged the original scores.

Highlights will include the famous scene in which a newly-hatched marine iguana is chased by snakes, as well as an octopus fighting off a shark by pushing their arms into the gills to suffocate the predator.

Dave said of his involvement with the show: “I’ve always been a fan of powerful natural history documentaries. This is a programme where nature and music come together, so it was only right that I lent my talent, my time, and my attention to this project.

“It was a pleasure to work alongside Sir David Attenborough and Hans Zimmer.”

Dave and the orchestra were filmed for the programme in the Lyndhurst Hall at Air Studios, London.

Dave plays the grand piano with the BBC Concert Orchestra on the Planet Earth special

Orchestra director Andrew Connolly also said: “To bring the Concert Orchestra out of lockdown in order to create new music with Dave and Hans Zimmer for Planet Earth: A Celebration was very special, and that feeling of coming together is at the heart of our performance.”

BBC director general Lord Tony Hall added: “This thrilling journey around the world promises to lift everyone’s spirits.”

Planet Earth: A Celebration will air on BBC One later this year.  

Brian Christy 2018-06-28
img

Muralwatch Keen fans of Crap Murals were seen heading to Shoreditch this morning, as a new artwork celebrating "two of history's greatest minds" was unveiled.

"The enormous 200 square foot mural (that took 52 cans of spray paint to paint) has been created to pay homage to two of history's greatest minds, and to get people thinking 'what if they collaborated?'

in celebration of the opening of Mindspace, the global co-working operator, in Shoreditch," the PR company for the sponsor proclaimed.

One half of the mural depicts "national treasure" (in their words) David Attenborough.

While the other celebrates the late Jimmy Hill, football legend.

What would happen if Jimmy Hill and David Attenborough collaborated, we were musing, perhaps even speculating that they actually had.

James Manzo 2019-01-02
img

Sometimes we feel overwhelmed at how much there is to do to save our planet and ourselves but there are some really simple things, that we can all do, which can and will really make a difference.

Here some simple things you can do from your desk without even breaking a sweat.

Buy compact fluorescent light bulbs.

Turn off your appliances when not in use, even your PC, printer etc - and maybe use an energy saving outlet

Use an environmentally-conscious search engine, like Elliot For Water or Ecosia.

Stop using plastic straws and get paper or steel reusable straws

Mary Jones 2016-11-07
img

Just when it would have been safe to assume that the world is going to hell, a glimmer of hope: It turns out that despite everything, the general public still prefer David Attenborough to The X-Factor.

According to the BBC the series premiere of Planet Earth 2 easily saw off the ITV talent show banking an average of 9.2m viewers throughout the 8pm hour.

The best Simon Cowell could do, meanwhile was 6.5m.

These numbers are likely to narrow once catch-up viewers are taken into account.

If you're a an of wild speculation, we'd guess that Planet Earth appealed to older viewers - whereas younger X-Factor viewers are more likely to watch on demand after the fact.

But Planet Earth still has a significant lead.

James Howard 2021-02-22
img
Sir David Attenborough

Sir David Attenborough is to warn world leaders that this year’s climate change talks are the last chance to prevent “runaway” global warming.

In a video address to the UN Security Council on Tuesday, the veteran broadcaster and naturalist will declare that the COP26 summit in Glasgow in November marks a key moment to avoid damage to the planet becoming “unstoppable”.

Attenborough has been invited to speak by Boris Johnson, who will chair the virtual meeting and will call on fellow leaders to tackle climate change to help avoid countries sliding into conflict over increasingly scarce natural resources.

The 94-year-old BBC broadcaster will tell the UN meeting: “If we bring emissions down with sufficient vigour we may yet avoid the tipping points that will make runaway climate change unstoppable.

“In November this year, at COP26 in Glasgow, we may have our last opportunity to make the necessary step-change.

“If we objectively view climate change and the loss of nature as world-wide security threats – as indeed, they are – then we may yet act proportionately and in time.”

The security council is currently made up of the UK, US, Russia, France and China, as well as India and Mexico.

Its latest session will be the first leader-level discussion it has held on climate, and is the first time it has been chaired by a British prime minister in nearly 30 years.

It comes as countries increasingly face the effects of rising temperatures and extreme weather, which is forcing populations to move and creating competition over increasingly scarce resources.

Of the 20 countries ranked most vulnerable to rising global temperatures, 12 are already in conflict, officials said.

Ahead of the meeting, Johnson said: “From the communities uprooted by extreme weather and hunger, to warlords capitalising on the scramble for resources – a warming planet is driving insecurity.

“Unlike many issues the security council deals with, this is one we know exactly how to address. By helping vulnerable countries adapt to climate change and cutting global emissions to net zero, we will protect not only the bountiful biodiversity of our planet, but its prosperity and security.”

Christian Aid’s climate policy lead, Dr Kat Kramer, added: “Millions of the world’s poorest people are already living with the impacts of climate change, which is forcing displacement, devastating livelihoods and putting pressure on communities who are competing over resources such as land and water.

“In some countries these impacts become the drivers of local conflicts which can be instrumentalised by leaders and escalate into violence and war.”