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Brian Christy 2017-10-05
img

Great for keeping sandwiches fresh AND de-orbiting sails

Blighty's defence boffins are now spending £10m per year on space research, including a satellite mission set for blast-off in 2019.

The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) is spending a total of £50m over the next five years on space "innovation", in particular for two space-related projects.

One of these is the Daedalus experiment, which aims to clear up space junk – that is, dead satellites in low Earth orbit – by attaching aluminium foil (a "de-orbiting sail" in the jargon).

The foil increases the satellite's drag and pulls it down into the thicker levels of the atmosphere where it will burn up.

Currently, space junk is destroyed by firing rockets at it.

collect
0
John Feeney 2016-09-16
img

El Reg gets nautical with ASV Global

One of these recently sailed around the Isle of Wight

RotM As the pace of automation gathers speed – from the Internet of Things to factory floors – there's a lot going on quietly but efficiently in robot boats, in particular, with Portchester-based ASV Global.

Founded in 1998 "as an idea", ASV – which stands for Autonomous Surface Vehicles – took off in 2007 after winning a research and development contract with the Defence Science and Technical Laboratory DSTL .

He characterises ASV's boats as having a high level of automation – but the potential is clearly there for true autonomous operation.

James Cowles, a product manager at ASV who is responsible for their science and survey products, explained one of the firm's current deployments in the Gulf of Mexico: There is a large oil supply vessel which is going out and placing acoustic transponders on the seabed.

collect
0
Steven Kopicko 2018-01-11
img

The British government has put a seven-year-old boy's design for a submarine into production, saying the lad had "really thought about" his work.

Apprentices from the Defence Science and Technology Lab (DSTL) took a submarine sketch sent to the government-owned lab by seven-year-old Jacob Bland, from Suffolk, which he said they could use for "sneaking and spying".

Using Jacob's sketch, DSTL apprentices worked up a proper design and produced the boat using a 3D printer.

Verity Jackson, one of the apprentices, said in a DSTL statement: "It was really great to be able to reproduce this for Jacob.

It was a bit tricky and took quite a bit of work to get the model ready to print, but we are all thrilled with the outcome and equally thrilled we were able to bring Jacob's drawing to life.

On the plus side, the mini project will help towards my qualification."

collect
0
Joseph Cormier 2019-01-02
img

The idea of a drone delivering our Amazon orders sounds pretty darn rad, but a key innovation that delivery drones offer is being able to transport supplies to places where they might not otherwise be safely or easily delivered.

With this goal in mind, the British Army is currently testing out an unorthodox glider-based drone that could one day be used to resupply troops or deliver humanitarian aid.

The drone is called Stork, and it’s the work of a U.K.-based company called Animal Dynamics.

Resembling a paraglider without the human pilot, it’s one of several technologies being explored as part of a competition called the “Autonomous Last Mile Resupply” challenge, which is organized by the U.K.’s Defense Science and Technology Laboratory (DTSL).

The aim is to find cutting-edge technologies that could support future military operations.

A smaller iteration weighs in at 50 kilograms (110 pounds) and is capable of carrying a total of 30 kilos (66 pounds).

collect
0
Tracy Rinehart 2016-10-19
img

Smart systems will have a role in the future of warfare on the high seas

The Royal Navy will put artificial intelligence AI systems on board its ships in order to better detect incoming threats and assess combat scenarios.

The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory Dstl , the Ministry of Defence s executive agency, has created an AI platform with aid of Roke Manor Research called Startle, which aims to provide situation awareness for ships in combat zones.

It does this through a combination of AI techniques, inspired by how the human brain works and the conditioned-fear response mechanism mammals have.

AI on the high seas

Royal Navy Type 45 Destroyer HMS Daring

collect
0
Sandra Wilson 2017-03-25
img

UK biomimetic engineering startup Animal Dynamics is building a microdrone with wings inspired by the flapping flight of a dragonfly.

Last fall the company switched from researching the feasibility of the concept into phase two: actually trying to build the thing.

But Animal Dynamics co-founder and CEO Alex Caccia says he’s confident it will take to the air in “two to three months’ time”.

The team is also looking to raise around £4 million in Series A funding in the next few months for continued development of Skeeter but also to fund some potential spin-out technologies they’ve created along the way — such as a high efficiency linear actuator designed for the drone which they reckon could also be used for other use-cases, such as in medical pumps and for road vehicle propulsion.

They don’t support stable flight in windy conditions.

Hence the MoD’s hope of driving development of a more robust flight technique that can withstand tough in-the-field environmental conditions.

collect
0
Joel Schroeder 2019-07-03
img

With over 22,000 artificial satellites in orbit it is essential to keep track of their positions in order to avoid unexpected collisions.

Grant Privett, of the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl), will talk about this surprising collaboration on Thursday 4th July at the Royal Astronomical Society's National Astronomy Meeting in Lancaster.

The amateur astronomers used commercially available telescopes, tripod-mounted DSLR cameras and low-light cameras to record images of satellites such as the International Space Station, Cryosat, and Remove Debris.

The full technical results from the collaboration will be published later this year.

NAM Press Office (during conference): 01524 595 245 or 01524 592 120

Cyber and Information Systems Department (CIS), DSTL Porton Down

collect
0
Alexander Ruper 2019-03-04

In the US the links between private sector technology and the defense industry are long and well known.

And in the realm of startups, DARPA, has long fostered new technologies such as those around drones.

But despite the world-class defense sector in the UK, historically speaking, it has not reached out quite so overtly to startups.

That is beginning to change with the announcement today of a brand new link between the pioneering UK space accelerator Seraphim Space Camp accelerator and the Defence, Science and Technology Laboratory.

Dstl will now become the newest corporate partner to support the programme in 2019, joining joins others including: Rolls Royce, Inmarsat, Airbus and the European Space Agency.

In summer last year Seraphim unveiled its first 6 startups.

collect
0
Jerry Anderson 2018-11-12
img

The UK's Ministry of Defence is "actively" trying to create fully autonomous killer drones, according to a report (PDF) by a campaign group.

"Powered by advances in artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, and computing, we are likely to see the development not only of drones that are able to fly themselves – staying aloft for extended periods – but those which may also be able to select, identify, and destroy targets without human intervention," said campaign group Drone Wars UK in its latest report, titled "Off The Leash: The development of autonomous military drones in the UK".

According to the group, whose raison d'etre is to advocate against the use of armed drones on the basis that they "encourage and lower the threshold for the use of lethal force", the British military is using academic and practical research to enhance military drone technology.

Key to that is the MoD's £80m/year innovation fund, which aims to tip cash into the pockets of companies carrying out R that might be useful on the battlefield one day.

In addition, the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) is looking long and hard at AI and big data and running public data science challenges to tap up the private sector's problem-solvers.

Drone Wars UK, whose report draws on Freedom of Information requests and public data, reckons a significant chunk of this research is leading us towards the rise of autonomous war machines.

collect
0
Earl Rizvi 2019-06-27
img

Paul Wiles: 'Clear and publicly accepted rules' needed for common data platform

The Ministry of Defence has been searching the police national fingerprint database without a “clearly defined lawful basis,” the UK's biometrics commissioner has said.

In his annual report (PDF) filed today, Paul Wiles warned that inter-government searching of databases should be properly regulated.

“I continue to be very concerned about the searching by the Ministry of Defence into the police national fingerprint database without an agreed, clearly defined lawful basis.”

The MoD has been using the database to check whether fingerprints taken or found during military operations abroad matched to persons known to the UK police or immigration authorities or matched crime scene fingerprints held by the police.

Wiles said he has repeatedly challenged the MoD as to the legal basis on which the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory has gained direct access to and is searching the police’s fingerprint collections.

collect
0
Raymond Maxwell 2016-10-20
img

Recently the UK Science & Technology Select Committee published a long awaited report into robotics and AI, and their implications for society.

Artificial intelligence has some way to go before we see systems and robots as portrayed in the creative arts such as Star Wars, said Dr Tania Mathis, the committee chair.

Whilst she is, of course, right, that isn t to say that ground isn t being made in AI applications in the military.

A good example of this is the recently prototyped product from Roke Manor Research as part of the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory DSTL .

The device, known as STARTLE, utilizes a range of AI techniques to monitor and evaluate threats at sea.

The system, which has been inspired by the fear response mechanism in the mammalian brain to detect and assess potential threats incredibly quickly, thus giving existing operators valuable support in complex and challenging situations.

collect
0
David Gilmore 2019-02-13
img

“The speed and ferocity of the devastating wildfires in California demonstrated the need to develop new ways of using science and technology to assist the emergency services wherever possible.”

Can drones be used to help fight runaway fires?

This is the question asked jointly by the UK’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) and the American Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL).

The two are putting on simultaneous hackathons next month to try to answer it; one in the US, the other in the ‘spark’ Facility at Southampton Solent University.

Individuals and teams will be tasked to come up with innovative ways to assist emergency services as they battle wildfires.

Fighting wildfires is of course a dangerous task, but those dangers can be compounded by the changing dynamic of a live fire, winds can change and combustible vegetation can ignite closing off entry or escape paths.

collect
0
Lillian Barnwell 2017-01-05
img

The Laws laser weapon was deployed for tests aboard a US Navy ship in 2014

The UK Ministry of Defence has officially awarded a £30m contract to produce a prototype laser weapon.

The aim is to see whether "directed energy" technology could benefit the armed forces, and is to culminate in a demonstration of the system in 2019.

The prototype will be assessed on how it picks up and tracks targets at different distances and in varied weather conditions over land and water.

Peter Cooper, from the UK's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory DTSL , headquartered at Porton Down, said the project "draws on innovative research into high power lasers so as to understand the potential of the technology".

He added that this could "provide a more effective response to the emerging threats that could be faced by UK armed forces".

collect
0
Zachary Stell 2016-10-18
img

STARTLE'd code to make decisions from waves of information

The Royal Navy is planning to step up its use of AI to improve maritime defence, beginning with STARTLE, which is AI software that can can spot potential threats.

At a briefing titled "Artificial Intelligence in Royal Navy Warships" hosted by non-profit TechUK, Blighty's navy announced it was keen to explore the potential of using machine-learning to improve operational capability in its fighting units under Project NELSON.

Developed by Roke Manor Research, the company claims it is the first supplier to integrate AI software into a Defence Science and Technology Laboratory-sponsored maritime combat system demonstrator.

Mike Hook, lead software architect on STARTLE at Roke, told The Register: It s hard to implement new technology in warships because it has so much proprietary software.

It works by using a neural network and machine learning to process information and flag warning signs in a similar way to the fear condition system found in mammalian brains.

collect
0
Ralph Elliot 2019-07-19
img

“Creating a ground infrastructure for future Space S missions is a key milestone in the continued rapid growth in our Space programme”

The UK’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) is getting ready to operate its first satellite ground station.

The ground station will be based in Portsdown West, Hampshire, and once staff plus technical personnel are fully trained, it is expected to begin controlling satellites in low-orbits by the end of 2019.

The ground station is one factor in the UK’s growing interest in controlling its assets in space and conducting in-orbit research from UK soil.

For any organisation operating with a satellite as part of its infrastructure keeping in touch with it can be a significant cost.

If the satellite is stationed in a low-earth orbit and the company only has one functioning antenna on earth, it then has to wait for that satellite to fly overhead so data can be transmitted back or new commands can be issued.

collect
0
James Neely 2018-04-04
img

Defence scientists’ caution over the source of the Salisbury nerve agent attack proves that Jeremy Corbyn was right to take a ‘thoughtful’ approach to the issue, Diane Abbott has said.

The Shadow Home Secretary said that an interview by the head of the Porton Down defence laboratory also cast doubt on Boris Johnson’s claim that Vladimir Putin was ‘unequivocally’ to blame for the attempted murder of a former Russian spy and his daughter.

Gary Aitkenhead, the chief executive of the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory at the facility, told Sky News on Tuesday that the lab had “not identified the precise source” of the poison, adding it was “not our job to say where it was manufactured”.

Critics seized on the contrast between the scientists’ caution and the Foreign Secretary’s interview with a German news channel in which he declared British defence experts had told him that the Kremlin was behind the attack on Sergei and Yulia Skripal.

Johnson had told DW.com: “People from Porton Down, they were absolutely categorical.

I asked the guy myself I said ‘are you sure?’ and he said there’s no doubt.”

collect
0
Brian Christy 2017-10-05
img

Great for keeping sandwiches fresh AND de-orbiting sails

Blighty's defence boffins are now spending £10m per year on space research, including a satellite mission set for blast-off in 2019.

The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) is spending a total of £50m over the next five years on space "innovation", in particular for two space-related projects.

One of these is the Daedalus experiment, which aims to clear up space junk – that is, dead satellites in low Earth orbit – by attaching aluminium foil (a "de-orbiting sail" in the jargon).

The foil increases the satellite's drag and pulls it down into the thicker levels of the atmosphere where it will burn up.

Currently, space junk is destroyed by firing rockets at it.

Steven Kopicko 2018-01-11
img

The British government has put a seven-year-old boy's design for a submarine into production, saying the lad had "really thought about" his work.

Apprentices from the Defence Science and Technology Lab (DSTL) took a submarine sketch sent to the government-owned lab by seven-year-old Jacob Bland, from Suffolk, which he said they could use for "sneaking and spying".

Using Jacob's sketch, DSTL apprentices worked up a proper design and produced the boat using a 3D printer.

Verity Jackson, one of the apprentices, said in a DSTL statement: "It was really great to be able to reproduce this for Jacob.

It was a bit tricky and took quite a bit of work to get the model ready to print, but we are all thrilled with the outcome and equally thrilled we were able to bring Jacob's drawing to life.

On the plus side, the mini project will help towards my qualification."

Tracy Rinehart 2016-10-19
img

Smart systems will have a role in the future of warfare on the high seas

The Royal Navy will put artificial intelligence AI systems on board its ships in order to better detect incoming threats and assess combat scenarios.

The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory Dstl , the Ministry of Defence s executive agency, has created an AI platform with aid of Roke Manor Research called Startle, which aims to provide situation awareness for ships in combat zones.

It does this through a combination of AI techniques, inspired by how the human brain works and the conditioned-fear response mechanism mammals have.

AI on the high seas

Royal Navy Type 45 Destroyer HMS Daring

Joel Schroeder 2019-07-03
img

With over 22,000 artificial satellites in orbit it is essential to keep track of their positions in order to avoid unexpected collisions.

Grant Privett, of the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl), will talk about this surprising collaboration on Thursday 4th July at the Royal Astronomical Society's National Astronomy Meeting in Lancaster.

The amateur astronomers used commercially available telescopes, tripod-mounted DSLR cameras and low-light cameras to record images of satellites such as the International Space Station, Cryosat, and Remove Debris.

The full technical results from the collaboration will be published later this year.

NAM Press Office (during conference): 01524 595 245 or 01524 592 120

Cyber and Information Systems Department (CIS), DSTL Porton Down

Jerry Anderson 2018-11-12
img

The UK's Ministry of Defence is "actively" trying to create fully autonomous killer drones, according to a report (PDF) by a campaign group.

"Powered by advances in artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, and computing, we are likely to see the development not only of drones that are able to fly themselves – staying aloft for extended periods – but those which may also be able to select, identify, and destroy targets without human intervention," said campaign group Drone Wars UK in its latest report, titled "Off The Leash: The development of autonomous military drones in the UK".

According to the group, whose raison d'etre is to advocate against the use of armed drones on the basis that they "encourage and lower the threshold for the use of lethal force", the British military is using academic and practical research to enhance military drone technology.

Key to that is the MoD's £80m/year innovation fund, which aims to tip cash into the pockets of companies carrying out R that might be useful on the battlefield one day.

In addition, the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) is looking long and hard at AI and big data and running public data science challenges to tap up the private sector's problem-solvers.

Drone Wars UK, whose report draws on Freedom of Information requests and public data, reckons a significant chunk of this research is leading us towards the rise of autonomous war machines.

Raymond Maxwell 2016-10-20
img

Recently the UK Science & Technology Select Committee published a long awaited report into robotics and AI, and their implications for society.

Artificial intelligence has some way to go before we see systems and robots as portrayed in the creative arts such as Star Wars, said Dr Tania Mathis, the committee chair.

Whilst she is, of course, right, that isn t to say that ground isn t being made in AI applications in the military.

A good example of this is the recently prototyped product from Roke Manor Research as part of the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory DSTL .

The device, known as STARTLE, utilizes a range of AI techniques to monitor and evaluate threats at sea.

The system, which has been inspired by the fear response mechanism in the mammalian brain to detect and assess potential threats incredibly quickly, thus giving existing operators valuable support in complex and challenging situations.

Lillian Barnwell 2017-01-05
img

The Laws laser weapon was deployed for tests aboard a US Navy ship in 2014

The UK Ministry of Defence has officially awarded a £30m contract to produce a prototype laser weapon.

The aim is to see whether "directed energy" technology could benefit the armed forces, and is to culminate in a demonstration of the system in 2019.

The prototype will be assessed on how it picks up and tracks targets at different distances and in varied weather conditions over land and water.

Peter Cooper, from the UK's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory DTSL , headquartered at Porton Down, said the project "draws on innovative research into high power lasers so as to understand the potential of the technology".

He added that this could "provide a more effective response to the emerging threats that could be faced by UK armed forces".

Ralph Elliot 2019-07-19
img

“Creating a ground infrastructure for future Space S missions is a key milestone in the continued rapid growth in our Space programme”

The UK’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) is getting ready to operate its first satellite ground station.

The ground station will be based in Portsdown West, Hampshire, and once staff plus technical personnel are fully trained, it is expected to begin controlling satellites in low-orbits by the end of 2019.

The ground station is one factor in the UK’s growing interest in controlling its assets in space and conducting in-orbit research from UK soil.

For any organisation operating with a satellite as part of its infrastructure keeping in touch with it can be a significant cost.

If the satellite is stationed in a low-earth orbit and the company only has one functioning antenna on earth, it then has to wait for that satellite to fly overhead so data can be transmitted back or new commands can be issued.

John Feeney 2016-09-16
img

El Reg gets nautical with ASV Global

One of these recently sailed around the Isle of Wight

RotM As the pace of automation gathers speed – from the Internet of Things to factory floors – there's a lot going on quietly but efficiently in robot boats, in particular, with Portchester-based ASV Global.

Founded in 1998 "as an idea", ASV – which stands for Autonomous Surface Vehicles – took off in 2007 after winning a research and development contract with the Defence Science and Technical Laboratory DSTL .

He characterises ASV's boats as having a high level of automation – but the potential is clearly there for true autonomous operation.

James Cowles, a product manager at ASV who is responsible for their science and survey products, explained one of the firm's current deployments in the Gulf of Mexico: There is a large oil supply vessel which is going out and placing acoustic transponders on the seabed.

Joseph Cormier 2019-01-02
img

The idea of a drone delivering our Amazon orders sounds pretty darn rad, but a key innovation that delivery drones offer is being able to transport supplies to places where they might not otherwise be safely or easily delivered.

With this goal in mind, the British Army is currently testing out an unorthodox glider-based drone that could one day be used to resupply troops or deliver humanitarian aid.

The drone is called Stork, and it’s the work of a U.K.-based company called Animal Dynamics.

Resembling a paraglider without the human pilot, it’s one of several technologies being explored as part of a competition called the “Autonomous Last Mile Resupply” challenge, which is organized by the U.K.’s Defense Science and Technology Laboratory (DTSL).

The aim is to find cutting-edge technologies that could support future military operations.

A smaller iteration weighs in at 50 kilograms (110 pounds) and is capable of carrying a total of 30 kilos (66 pounds).

Sandra Wilson 2017-03-25
img

UK biomimetic engineering startup Animal Dynamics is building a microdrone with wings inspired by the flapping flight of a dragonfly.

Last fall the company switched from researching the feasibility of the concept into phase two: actually trying to build the thing.

But Animal Dynamics co-founder and CEO Alex Caccia says he’s confident it will take to the air in “two to three months’ time”.

The team is also looking to raise around £4 million in Series A funding in the next few months for continued development of Skeeter but also to fund some potential spin-out technologies they’ve created along the way — such as a high efficiency linear actuator designed for the drone which they reckon could also be used for other use-cases, such as in medical pumps and for road vehicle propulsion.

They don’t support stable flight in windy conditions.

Hence the MoD’s hope of driving development of a more robust flight technique that can withstand tough in-the-field environmental conditions.

Alexander Ruper 2019-03-04

In the US the links between private sector technology and the defense industry are long and well known.

And in the realm of startups, DARPA, has long fostered new technologies such as those around drones.

But despite the world-class defense sector in the UK, historically speaking, it has not reached out quite so overtly to startups.

That is beginning to change with the announcement today of a brand new link between the pioneering UK space accelerator Seraphim Space Camp accelerator and the Defence, Science and Technology Laboratory.

Dstl will now become the newest corporate partner to support the programme in 2019, joining joins others including: Rolls Royce, Inmarsat, Airbus and the European Space Agency.

In summer last year Seraphim unveiled its first 6 startups.

Earl Rizvi 2019-06-27
img

Paul Wiles: 'Clear and publicly accepted rules' needed for common data platform

The Ministry of Defence has been searching the police national fingerprint database without a “clearly defined lawful basis,” the UK's biometrics commissioner has said.

In his annual report (PDF) filed today, Paul Wiles warned that inter-government searching of databases should be properly regulated.

“I continue to be very concerned about the searching by the Ministry of Defence into the police national fingerprint database without an agreed, clearly defined lawful basis.”

The MoD has been using the database to check whether fingerprints taken or found during military operations abroad matched to persons known to the UK police or immigration authorities or matched crime scene fingerprints held by the police.

Wiles said he has repeatedly challenged the MoD as to the legal basis on which the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory has gained direct access to and is searching the police’s fingerprint collections.

David Gilmore 2019-02-13
img

“The speed and ferocity of the devastating wildfires in California demonstrated the need to develop new ways of using science and technology to assist the emergency services wherever possible.”

Can drones be used to help fight runaway fires?

This is the question asked jointly by the UK’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) and the American Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL).

The two are putting on simultaneous hackathons next month to try to answer it; one in the US, the other in the ‘spark’ Facility at Southampton Solent University.

Individuals and teams will be tasked to come up with innovative ways to assist emergency services as they battle wildfires.

Fighting wildfires is of course a dangerous task, but those dangers can be compounded by the changing dynamic of a live fire, winds can change and combustible vegetation can ignite closing off entry or escape paths.

Zachary Stell 2016-10-18
img

STARTLE'd code to make decisions from waves of information

The Royal Navy is planning to step up its use of AI to improve maritime defence, beginning with STARTLE, which is AI software that can can spot potential threats.

At a briefing titled "Artificial Intelligence in Royal Navy Warships" hosted by non-profit TechUK, Blighty's navy announced it was keen to explore the potential of using machine-learning to improve operational capability in its fighting units under Project NELSON.

Developed by Roke Manor Research, the company claims it is the first supplier to integrate AI software into a Defence Science and Technology Laboratory-sponsored maritime combat system demonstrator.

Mike Hook, lead software architect on STARTLE at Roke, told The Register: It s hard to implement new technology in warships because it has so much proprietary software.

It works by using a neural network and machine learning to process information and flag warning signs in a similar way to the fear condition system found in mammalian brains.

James Neely 2018-04-04
img

Defence scientists’ caution over the source of the Salisbury nerve agent attack proves that Jeremy Corbyn was right to take a ‘thoughtful’ approach to the issue, Diane Abbott has said.

The Shadow Home Secretary said that an interview by the head of the Porton Down defence laboratory also cast doubt on Boris Johnson’s claim that Vladimir Putin was ‘unequivocally’ to blame for the attempted murder of a former Russian spy and his daughter.

Gary Aitkenhead, the chief executive of the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory at the facility, told Sky News on Tuesday that the lab had “not identified the precise source” of the poison, adding it was “not our job to say where it was manufactured”.

Critics seized on the contrast between the scientists’ caution and the Foreign Secretary’s interview with a German news channel in which he declared British defence experts had told him that the Kremlin was behind the attack on Sergei and Yulia Skripal.

Johnson had told DW.com: “People from Porton Down, they were absolutely categorical.

I asked the guy myself I said ‘are you sure?’ and he said there’s no doubt.”