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Ronald Evans 2019-01-25
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A chunk of Earth that could be 4.1 billion years old and is described as the planet's "oldest rock" may have been found and dug up on the Moon by Apollo astronauts, according to a new study.

The possible relic was discovered and dug up in 1971 and scientists believe that it was sent off Earth, thanks to a powerful impact, possibly an asteroid or a comet.

After colliding with the Moon (which at the time was three times closer to the Earth than it is now), it mixed with other lunar surface materials.

"It is an extraordinary find that helps paint a better picture of early Earth and the bombardment that modified our planet during the dawn of life," said study co-author David Kring, a Universities Space Research Association (USRA) scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, in a statement.

MOON ROCKS RETRIEVED BY SOVIET SPACE MISSION SOLD FOR $855G

Analyzing lunar samples collected by the Apollo 14 mission, the researchers found that the rock consisted of 0.08 ounces of quartz, feldspar and zircon, minerals that are fairly commonplace on Earth but "highly unusual on the Moon," according to the statement.

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John Feeney 2018-07-24
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An extremely rare miniature Bible that travelled to the Moon on the Apollo 14 mission is up for auction.

The Bible is one of only 11 lunar-landed copies, according to Los Angeles auction house Nate D. Sanders Auctions.

Apollo 14, which comprised astronauts Alan Shepard, Stuart Roosa and Edgar Mitchell, launched on Jan. 31, 1971 and landed on the Moon on Feb. 5, 1971.

The mission’s command module splashed down in the South Pacific on Feb. 9, 1971.

The King James microform Bible measures just 1.625-square inches and was given to the mission by the Apollo Prayer League.

John M. Stout, a NASA information scientist, in 1968 after Gus Grissom, Edward White II and Roger Chaffee were killed in the prior year’s tragic Apollo 1 fire.

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0
Donald Koontz 2021-02-06
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One of the most impressive eras in space exploration happened decades ago when NASA conducted the Apollo missions sending humans to the moon for the first time. NASA fans might not know that as part of the Apollo 14 mission with Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell, a third astronaut, Stuart Roosa, stayed above the moon in a command module and … Continue reading
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0
Brian Williams 2018-07-10
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This programmer saved the Apollo 14 mission with a few dozen keystrokes

In the early hours of 5 February 1971, Don Eyles had a big problem: Apollo 14 astronauts Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell were orbiting the moon, preparing to land, but it looked like they were going to have to come home without putting so much as a single footprint on the surface.

The only way to save the mission was for Eyles to hack his own software.

Shepard and Mitchell were onboard their lunar module, the Antares.

The Antares flight computer was registering occasional presses of an Abort button in the cabin, even though the astronauts hadn’t touched it.

A loose ball of solder was floating around in zero gravity inside the switch and shorting it out.

collect
0
Jose Wenger 2016-07-29
img

Astronaut Charles "Pete" Conrad Jr., Apollo 12 commander, stands beside the United States flag on the lunar surface during the first extravehicular activity in this November 16, 1969 NASA handout photo

The rarified group of men who blasted off from Earth on the Apollo missions in the 1960s and 70s have suffered from much higher rates of death by cardiovascular disease than not only other astronauts, but a slice of the U.S. population as a whole, a new study finds.

Researchers looked at the rate of death from cardiovascular disease among astronauts who never flew in space, went to space but stayed in low-Earth orbit, and the Apollo astronauts, who went further away from Earth than anyone else.

Of the 24 Apollo astronauts who flew into deep space, eight have died and seven were included in the study.

The eighth astronaut - Edgar Mitchell - died after the data analysis had been completed.

That s much higher than the other groups the researchers considered.

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0
Jeff Bautista 2019-01-26
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Incredibly, it’s now amongst the oldest terrestrial rocks known to exist.

The fragment likely reached the Moon’s surface after an asteroid or comet smashed into the Earth, flinging debris into space.

Big Bertha was collected by NASA astronauts Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell in 1971 during the Apollo 14 million to the Fra Mauro formation.

“In layman’s terms it means this is a rock made from a jumble of previously existing rocks and rock fragments, as well as melt and impactor material formed during a large impact or series of impacts on the Moon,” James Day, a professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography who wasn’t involved with the new study, told Gizmodo.

“What we did was use the composition of minerals in the fragment to show it formed under conditions that only occur on Earth,” Robinson told Gizmodo.

“For example, the composition of certain minerals are sensitive to temperature and pressure; they contain more or less of various elements if they crystallise in hot or cool, and/or deep or shallow environments.

collect
0
Paul Cork 2018-02-05
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The Moon landings mark a pinnacle in human exploration, innovation and achievment, a moment in our existence that has not yet been surpassed.

On this day in 1971, Apollo 14 landed on the Moon on the eighth manned mission of the United States Apollo program.

It is rare in the world of technology that we can look back in time at a pinnacle of human achievement and innovation, but the moon landings still mark the boundary in physical human exploration.

The spot chosen for the landing was in the Fra Mauro Formation situated close to the Cone Crater.

Having achieved great success with landing accuracy on previous missions like Apollo 12, the planners behind the subsequent missions were confident in taking on more complex geological challenges.

They’re scattered around falling between here and Doublet.

collect
0
William Hill 2018-07-26
img

When you think of golf, legendary players like Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, Tiger Woods and Bobby Jones may come to mind.

None of those legends, however, hit arguably the most fabled shot in history.

That distinction belongs to a NASA astronaut.

“I shanked the first one; it rolled into a crater about 40 yards way,” said Shepard.

Shepard’s Apollo 14 mission came right after the ill-fated Apollo 13 mission where an oxygen tank exploded causing the astronauts to scramble to return safely to Earth.

Maggie Lagle, a historian for the USGA, told Fox News that NASA did not have a sense of humor after Apollo 13 and would not have let Shepard take a golf club on the mission, so Shepard snuck a club and balls into space with him.

collect
0
Manuel Darcangelo 2021-02-05
img
50 years ago, the Apollo 14 astronaut hit a golf ball that traveled roughly 40 yards.
collect
0
Ronald Evans 2019-01-25
img

A chunk of Earth that could be 4.1 billion years old and is described as the planet's "oldest rock" may have been found and dug up on the Moon by Apollo astronauts, according to a new study.

The possible relic was discovered and dug up in 1971 and scientists believe that it was sent off Earth, thanks to a powerful impact, possibly an asteroid or a comet.

After colliding with the Moon (which at the time was three times closer to the Earth than it is now), it mixed with other lunar surface materials.

"It is an extraordinary find that helps paint a better picture of early Earth and the bombardment that modified our planet during the dawn of life," said study co-author David Kring, a Universities Space Research Association (USRA) scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, in a statement.

MOON ROCKS RETRIEVED BY SOVIET SPACE MISSION SOLD FOR $855G

Analyzing lunar samples collected by the Apollo 14 mission, the researchers found that the rock consisted of 0.08 ounces of quartz, feldspar and zircon, minerals that are fairly commonplace on Earth but "highly unusual on the Moon," according to the statement.

Donald Koontz 2021-02-06
img
One of the most impressive eras in space exploration happened decades ago when NASA conducted the Apollo missions sending humans to the moon for the first time. NASA fans might not know that as part of the Apollo 14 mission with Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell, a third astronaut, Stuart Roosa, stayed above the moon in a command module and … Continue reading
Jose Wenger 2016-07-29
img

Astronaut Charles "Pete" Conrad Jr., Apollo 12 commander, stands beside the United States flag on the lunar surface during the first extravehicular activity in this November 16, 1969 NASA handout photo

The rarified group of men who blasted off from Earth on the Apollo missions in the 1960s and 70s have suffered from much higher rates of death by cardiovascular disease than not only other astronauts, but a slice of the U.S. population as a whole, a new study finds.

Researchers looked at the rate of death from cardiovascular disease among astronauts who never flew in space, went to space but stayed in low-Earth orbit, and the Apollo astronauts, who went further away from Earth than anyone else.

Of the 24 Apollo astronauts who flew into deep space, eight have died and seven were included in the study.

The eighth astronaut - Edgar Mitchell - died after the data analysis had been completed.

That s much higher than the other groups the researchers considered.

Paul Cork 2018-02-05
img

The Moon landings mark a pinnacle in human exploration, innovation and achievment, a moment in our existence that has not yet been surpassed.

On this day in 1971, Apollo 14 landed on the Moon on the eighth manned mission of the United States Apollo program.

It is rare in the world of technology that we can look back in time at a pinnacle of human achievement and innovation, but the moon landings still mark the boundary in physical human exploration.

The spot chosen for the landing was in the Fra Mauro Formation situated close to the Cone Crater.

Having achieved great success with landing accuracy on previous missions like Apollo 12, the planners behind the subsequent missions were confident in taking on more complex geological challenges.

They’re scattered around falling between here and Doublet.

Manuel Darcangelo 2021-02-05
img
50 years ago, the Apollo 14 astronaut hit a golf ball that traveled roughly 40 yards.
John Feeney 2018-07-24
img

An extremely rare miniature Bible that travelled to the Moon on the Apollo 14 mission is up for auction.

The Bible is one of only 11 lunar-landed copies, according to Los Angeles auction house Nate D. Sanders Auctions.

Apollo 14, which comprised astronauts Alan Shepard, Stuart Roosa and Edgar Mitchell, launched on Jan. 31, 1971 and landed on the Moon on Feb. 5, 1971.

The mission’s command module splashed down in the South Pacific on Feb. 9, 1971.

The King James microform Bible measures just 1.625-square inches and was given to the mission by the Apollo Prayer League.

John M. Stout, a NASA information scientist, in 1968 after Gus Grissom, Edward White II and Roger Chaffee were killed in the prior year’s tragic Apollo 1 fire.

Brian Williams 2018-07-10
img

This programmer saved the Apollo 14 mission with a few dozen keystrokes

In the early hours of 5 February 1971, Don Eyles had a big problem: Apollo 14 astronauts Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell were orbiting the moon, preparing to land, but it looked like they were going to have to come home without putting so much as a single footprint on the surface.

The only way to save the mission was for Eyles to hack his own software.

Shepard and Mitchell were onboard their lunar module, the Antares.

The Antares flight computer was registering occasional presses of an Abort button in the cabin, even though the astronauts hadn’t touched it.

A loose ball of solder was floating around in zero gravity inside the switch and shorting it out.

Jeff Bautista 2019-01-26
img

Incredibly, it’s now amongst the oldest terrestrial rocks known to exist.

The fragment likely reached the Moon’s surface after an asteroid or comet smashed into the Earth, flinging debris into space.

Big Bertha was collected by NASA astronauts Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell in 1971 during the Apollo 14 million to the Fra Mauro formation.

“In layman’s terms it means this is a rock made from a jumble of previously existing rocks and rock fragments, as well as melt and impactor material formed during a large impact or series of impacts on the Moon,” James Day, a professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography who wasn’t involved with the new study, told Gizmodo.

“What we did was use the composition of minerals in the fragment to show it formed under conditions that only occur on Earth,” Robinson told Gizmodo.

“For example, the composition of certain minerals are sensitive to temperature and pressure; they contain more or less of various elements if they crystallise in hot or cool, and/or deep or shallow environments.

William Hill 2018-07-26
img

When you think of golf, legendary players like Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, Tiger Woods and Bobby Jones may come to mind.

None of those legends, however, hit arguably the most fabled shot in history.

That distinction belongs to a NASA astronaut.

“I shanked the first one; it rolled into a crater about 40 yards way,” said Shepard.

Shepard’s Apollo 14 mission came right after the ill-fated Apollo 13 mission where an oxygen tank exploded causing the astronauts to scramble to return safely to Earth.

Maggie Lagle, a historian for the USGA, told Fox News that NASA did not have a sense of humor after Apollo 13 and would not have let Shepard take a golf club on the mission, so Shepard snuck a club and balls into space with him.