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Dana Millard 2018-12-04
img

Microsoft is purportedly planning a major change to its Edge browser.

A report from Windows Central suggests Microsoft plans to ditch its proprietary EdgeHTML back end for Chromium—which could spell a more pleasant browser experience for Edge users.

If this sounds like Greek, then what you need to know is EdgeHTML is a rendering engine Microsoft specifically built for its browser.

It was meant to help Edge be a fast, secure, and lightweight browser, but the reality is it just hasn’t been able to keep up support or performance-wise with the competition.

Meanwhile, Chromium is an open-source browser project powered by the Blink engine and it forms the basis for Google Chrome—the internet’s most popular browser.

While Edge is much better than when it first launched in 2015, it still plays second fiddle to Chrome and Firefox.

collect
0
Tom Snipes 2018-12-18
img

Building a web browser is no easy task, especially when your competition is seemingly playing dirty.

According to a former Microsoft intern working on the company’s Edge web browser, Google attempted to leverage code onto some of Microsoft’s most popular online platforms.

Software engineer Joshua Bakita explained why Microsoft chose to kill its EdgeHTML engine in favor of Chromium, and exactly how Google may have tried to trip up the Edge browser.

Microsoft recently announced that it would be switching the browser engine behind the Edge web browser from its custom EdgeHTML solution to Google’s Project Chromium.

The switch is an attempt to make the Edge browsing experience more reliable with the multitude of websites that are designed with a focus on Google’s Chrome web browser.

Bakita noted that one of the primary reasons behind the change was due to Google continually making changes to its sites that would break compatibility.

collect
0
Richard Baty 2018-12-07
img

Microsoft has officially confirmed that its floundering Edge web browser will be rebuilt on the Chromium rendering engine, which is the same code that Google’s Chrome web browser uses.

While Chrome is the most popular web browser in the world – and by quite a margin – Edge has been struggling to make an impact for a while now, so this move is (in our view) a good one by Microsoft.

In a blog post announcing the move, Joe Belfiore, Corporate Vice President of Windows, stated that “we intend to adopt the Chromium open source project in the development of Microsoft Edge on the desktop to create better web compatibility for our customers and less fragmentation of the web for all web developers”.

Previously, Edge had its own proprietary browser engine, EdgeHTML, which was praised for its performance in some areas, but also brought frustration to web developers due to compatibility issues.

The fact that such a small number of people were using Edge compared to Chrome also meant that it wasn’t always worth developers time to make sure their code was compatible with EdgeHTML.

"We intend to adopt the Chromium open source project in the development of Microsoft Edge on the desktop."

collect
0
Ralph Philbrick 2018-12-19

A former Microsoft intern has revealed details of a YouTube incident that has convinced some Edge browser engineers that Google added code to purposely break compatibility.

In a post on Hacker News, Joshua Bakita, a former software engineering intern at Microsoft, lays out details and claims about an incident earlier this year.

Microsoft has since announced the company is moving from the EdgeHTML rendering engine to the open source Chromium project for its Edge browser.

Bakita explains that “one of the reasons we [Microsoft] decided to end EdgeHTML was because Google kept making changes to its sites that broke other browsers, and we couldn’t keep up.” Bakita claims that Google added a “hidden empty div over YouTube videos” that affected Microsoft’s hardware acceleration for videos.

“Prior to that, our fairly state-of-the-art video acceleration put us well ahead of Chrome on video playback time on battery, but almost the instant they broke things on YouTube, they started advertising Chrome’s dominance over Edge on video-watching battery life.”

The claims are surprising if they’re genuine, and they come months after a Mozilla program manager claimed a separate YouTube redesign made the site “5x slower in Firefox and Edge.” That incident led Edge, Safari, and Firefox users to revert to scripts to improve the YouTube experience.

collect
0
Danny Knackstedt 2018-12-07
img

After rumours circulated that such a move was imminent, Microsoft has confirmed that it is indeed shifting from its EdgeHTML back end to Chromium, the open-source project that powers Google Chrome.

In confirming the rumour, the company also said it expected this shift could allow it to introduce Microsoft Edge to macOS.

Joe Belfiore, corporate vice president of Windows, wrote in a blog post on Thursday that the move marked a change toward a “better” web experience with Edge – which will be powered by the Blink and V8 JavaScript engines under Chromium – and one that on the consumer side will improve compatibility across websites.

However, a big focus of this shift is on web developers, who Belfiore noted “will have a less-fragmented web platform to test their sites against, ensuring that there are fewer problems and increased satisfaction for users of their sites; and because we’ll continue to provide the Microsoft Edge service-driven understanding of legacy IE-only sites, Corporate IT will have improved compatibility for both old and new web apps in the browser that comes with Windows.”

Another key highlight of the announcement is the suggestion that Microsoft Edge is coming to the Mac.

Belfiore wrote that Microsoft “[expected] this work to enable us to bring Microsoft Edge to other platforms like macOS,” though no specific timeline has yet been offered for when that may happen.

collect
0
Paul Williams 2018-12-07
img

Future versions of Edge would use Google’s Chromium rendering engine, which powers a swathe of browsers, including Chrome and Opera.

Edge was never a popular browser, and at the time of writing commands just 4.34 percent of the market, according to NetMarketShare.

Mozilla, the non-profit behind the Firefox browser, is deeply anxious about Microsoft’s recent move, and the inevitable prospect of handing more of the Internet to Google.

After all, this is the company that single-handedly reversed Microsoft’s monopoly of the browser market in the early 2000’s.

Although Mozilla acknowledges that giving up on Edge makes business sense for Microsoft, it states that the Redmond’s decision empowers Google to “single-handedly decide what possibilities are available to each one of us.”

“From a social, civic and individual empowerment perspective ceding control of fundamental online infrastructure to a single company is terrible,” wrote Mozilla CEO Chris Beard.

collect
0
James Maloch 2018-12-07
img

Techcrunch reports that Microsoft will abandon its proprietary html engine edgehtml and start using the Chromium in the Edge instead.

It means both that the program will get to the older versions of Windows and that Microsoft for the first time since Internet Explorer for the Mac was shut down in 2005, will now take up a Macversion of their web browser.

Edge for Mac will be released sometime next year, with an early test version for developers in the beginning of the year.

Since many web developers use Mac, Microsoft has had problems getting these to test their sites and web apps in the Edge, when it is so much more cumbersome than to just test in Chrome, Opera, Firefox and Safari.

collect
0
Carl Fox 2021-03-10
img
microsoft edge

Microsoft has announced the end of support for the classic non-chromium Edge Legacy browser. While Microsoft Edge on the proprietary EdgeHTML engine is included in ...

The post Microsoft has ended support for the classic non-chromium Edge browser appeared first on Gizchina.com.

collect
0
Adolfo Lorenzo 2017-10-05
img

Rather than go down the path of having an open beta, Microsoft is releasing Edge for iOS via a TestFlight.

This, sadly, is limited to just 10,000 users.

Edge on Android and iOS lets you access the favorites and reading list you saved on your computer.

It also comes with Reading View baked-in, which offers a delightfully distraction-free reading experience.

Astonishingly, the mobile versions of Edge don’t use the EdgeHTML layout engine, but rather whatever is standard on the device.

Adapting Edge in its entirety for the two incumbent mobile platforms would probably be really technologically challenging.

collect
0
Alfred Borrow 2016-12-14
img

Microsoft will offer the option to block Adobe Flash content from appearing in its Edge browser.

Microsoft said Wednesday that it has chosen a strategy for its Edge browser similar to that of Google Chrome.

Flash will be a click-to-play option in future builds, allowing users to turn it off entirely if they so wish.

For now, the new Flash-blocking capability will be limited to members of its Windows Insider program running Edge with EdgeHTML 15 within Windows 10.

According to Kyle Pflug, a communications manager for the Edge team, Insiders will be able to try it out in the next Insider build.

The days of Flash are over, and none too soon.

collect
0
Keith Maldonado 2020-09-01
img

Much of the code we write these days depends on the web. After all, why develop a new protocol when you can add a custom payload to HTTP? There’s no need to create a new layer in the networking stack when there’s already one that’s extensible, flexible, and secure. Instead we can take advantage of the GET and POST functions in HTTP and work with RESTful APIs.

Yes, that’s oversimplifying, but in practice very few occasions demand something completely new. HTTP is a simplification, yes, but it’s also an obfuscation. If everything we use is HTTP under the hood, how do we build testing and development tools that can work with those APIs?

Although the Open API Initiative and other approaches go a long way to codifying how we describe and implement HTTP-based APIs, we’re usually left cobbling together a mix of different tools to build and test our API calls. Postman is probably the most popular and most familiar tool out there, but it’s separate from both our development environments and our browsers, making it hard to be sure that we’re designing and testing HTTP calls in the context of our applications.

To read this article in full, please click here

collect
0
James Hammond 2018-12-04

Microsoft Edge has failed to capture the public’s attention since launching back in 2015, so you can’t really blame the company for switching tacks.

According to new reports that first surfaced in Windows Central, the browser isn’t not long for this world.

Microsoft could announce its replacement as early as this week.

As for what’s next for the Windows 10 default browser, the company is reportedly looking to Google for some help on that front.

The next-gen browser is said to find Microsoft swapping Edge’s EdgeHTML rending engine for Chromium.

All of this is still early stages for the project that has been floating around with the internal name “Anaheim,” but Internet Explorer’s replacement’s replacement will hopefully address some stability and compatibility issues that have hampered adoption.

collect
0
Michael Wadsworth 2018-12-07
img

Microsoft announced it would be rebuilding Edge on Windows 10 by using Google’s Chromium engine, but not everyone is happy with the decision.

In a recent blog post, Mozilla CEO Chris Beard writes that he believes the move is “handing even more of online life” to Google.

Beard essentially says goodbye to EdgeHTML and addresses the business, social, and future implications of Microsoft’s decision.

Additionally, not only does Beard appear to strongly go against Microsoft’s choosing of Chromium, he points that it could also possibly have an impact on Firefox market share.

Beard mentions Microsoft’s former dominant share on browsers in the early 2000s and suggests that it could now happen again with Chromium and go on to make Google even more powerful.

“Making Google more powerful is risky on many fronts.

collect
0
Joshua Herbert 2019-08-27
img

Microsoft’s switch to a new Chromium-based version of Edge is well underway.

The company has been offering Edge Insiders access to weekly Developer and daily Canary builds of the new browser for several months, and recently unveiled a more stable beta channel build, updated every six weeks, aimed primarily at end-users.

It’s a well-though-out approach that signals a stable release sometime at the end of 2019 or the beginning of 2020.

Changing out your application’s browser controls

The change is significant in many ways: most importantly a separation of browser and operating system.

That link between the two had allowed the original EdgeHTML-powered version of Edge to slip behind its competitors, as it could only get significant updates twice a year, with Windows’ updates.

collect
0
Harold Roscoe 2021-07-23
img
Microsoft Edge has come a long way since it switched from Microsoft’s homegrown edgeHTML engine to Chromium. It gained quite a number of useful feature that helps it compete with other Chromium-based web browsers, including Google Chrome. Those features are coming into focus as Microsoft prepares for the upcoming academic year with a few bits and pieces that make Edge … Continue reading
collect
0
Thomas Cann 2018-12-04
img

It seems that Microsoft can never rid itself its web browser curse.

Although it became the most used browser in the world, Internet Explorer ended up also becoming its most unpopular.

Redmond tried to separate itself from the legacy with Microsoft Edge.

After no small amount of aggressive marketing and even intrusive tactics, it seems that Microsoft is ready to throw in the towel and build a new default browser for Windows 10, one built around the same rendering engine used by rival Google Chrome.

Microsoft tried to shed off Internet Explorer in the easiest way possible.

It started from scratch to create a browser and a rendering engine, EdgeHTML, that it swears is designed to be fast and light and secure.

collect
0
Dana Millard 2018-12-04
img

Microsoft is purportedly planning a major change to its Edge browser.

A report from Windows Central suggests Microsoft plans to ditch its proprietary EdgeHTML back end for Chromium—which could spell a more pleasant browser experience for Edge users.

If this sounds like Greek, then what you need to know is EdgeHTML is a rendering engine Microsoft specifically built for its browser.

It was meant to help Edge be a fast, secure, and lightweight browser, but the reality is it just hasn’t been able to keep up support or performance-wise with the competition.

Meanwhile, Chromium is an open-source browser project powered by the Blink engine and it forms the basis for Google Chrome—the internet’s most popular browser.

While Edge is much better than when it first launched in 2015, it still plays second fiddle to Chrome and Firefox.

Richard Baty 2018-12-07
img

Microsoft has officially confirmed that its floundering Edge web browser will be rebuilt on the Chromium rendering engine, which is the same code that Google’s Chrome web browser uses.

While Chrome is the most popular web browser in the world – and by quite a margin – Edge has been struggling to make an impact for a while now, so this move is (in our view) a good one by Microsoft.

In a blog post announcing the move, Joe Belfiore, Corporate Vice President of Windows, stated that “we intend to adopt the Chromium open source project in the development of Microsoft Edge on the desktop to create better web compatibility for our customers and less fragmentation of the web for all web developers”.

Previously, Edge had its own proprietary browser engine, EdgeHTML, which was praised for its performance in some areas, but also brought frustration to web developers due to compatibility issues.

The fact that such a small number of people were using Edge compared to Chrome also meant that it wasn’t always worth developers time to make sure their code was compatible with EdgeHTML.

"We intend to adopt the Chromium open source project in the development of Microsoft Edge on the desktop."

Danny Knackstedt 2018-12-07
img

After rumours circulated that such a move was imminent, Microsoft has confirmed that it is indeed shifting from its EdgeHTML back end to Chromium, the open-source project that powers Google Chrome.

In confirming the rumour, the company also said it expected this shift could allow it to introduce Microsoft Edge to macOS.

Joe Belfiore, corporate vice president of Windows, wrote in a blog post on Thursday that the move marked a change toward a “better” web experience with Edge – which will be powered by the Blink and V8 JavaScript engines under Chromium – and one that on the consumer side will improve compatibility across websites.

However, a big focus of this shift is on web developers, who Belfiore noted “will have a less-fragmented web platform to test their sites against, ensuring that there are fewer problems and increased satisfaction for users of their sites; and because we’ll continue to provide the Microsoft Edge service-driven understanding of legacy IE-only sites, Corporate IT will have improved compatibility for both old and new web apps in the browser that comes with Windows.”

Another key highlight of the announcement is the suggestion that Microsoft Edge is coming to the Mac.

Belfiore wrote that Microsoft “[expected] this work to enable us to bring Microsoft Edge to other platforms like macOS,” though no specific timeline has yet been offered for when that may happen.

James Maloch 2018-12-07
img

Techcrunch reports that Microsoft will abandon its proprietary html engine edgehtml and start using the Chromium in the Edge instead.

It means both that the program will get to the older versions of Windows and that Microsoft for the first time since Internet Explorer for the Mac was shut down in 2005, will now take up a Macversion of their web browser.

Edge for Mac will be released sometime next year, with an early test version for developers in the beginning of the year.

Since many web developers use Mac, Microsoft has had problems getting these to test their sites and web apps in the Edge, when it is so much more cumbersome than to just test in Chrome, Opera, Firefox and Safari.

Adolfo Lorenzo 2017-10-05
img

Rather than go down the path of having an open beta, Microsoft is releasing Edge for iOS via a TestFlight.

This, sadly, is limited to just 10,000 users.

Edge on Android and iOS lets you access the favorites and reading list you saved on your computer.

It also comes with Reading View baked-in, which offers a delightfully distraction-free reading experience.

Astonishingly, the mobile versions of Edge don’t use the EdgeHTML layout engine, but rather whatever is standard on the device.

Adapting Edge in its entirety for the two incumbent mobile platforms would probably be really technologically challenging.

Keith Maldonado 2020-09-01
img

Much of the code we write these days depends on the web. After all, why develop a new protocol when you can add a custom payload to HTTP? There’s no need to create a new layer in the networking stack when there’s already one that’s extensible, flexible, and secure. Instead we can take advantage of the GET and POST functions in HTTP and work with RESTful APIs.

Yes, that’s oversimplifying, but in practice very few occasions demand something completely new. HTTP is a simplification, yes, but it’s also an obfuscation. If everything we use is HTTP under the hood, how do we build testing and development tools that can work with those APIs?

Although the Open API Initiative and other approaches go a long way to codifying how we describe and implement HTTP-based APIs, we’re usually left cobbling together a mix of different tools to build and test our API calls. Postman is probably the most popular and most familiar tool out there, but it’s separate from both our development environments and our browsers, making it hard to be sure that we’re designing and testing HTTP calls in the context of our applications.

To read this article in full, please click here

Michael Wadsworth 2018-12-07
img

Microsoft announced it would be rebuilding Edge on Windows 10 by using Google’s Chromium engine, but not everyone is happy with the decision.

In a recent blog post, Mozilla CEO Chris Beard writes that he believes the move is “handing even more of online life” to Google.

Beard essentially says goodbye to EdgeHTML and addresses the business, social, and future implications of Microsoft’s decision.

Additionally, not only does Beard appear to strongly go against Microsoft’s choosing of Chromium, he points that it could also possibly have an impact on Firefox market share.

Beard mentions Microsoft’s former dominant share on browsers in the early 2000s and suggests that it could now happen again with Chromium and go on to make Google even more powerful.

“Making Google more powerful is risky on many fronts.

Harold Roscoe 2021-07-23
img
Microsoft Edge has come a long way since it switched from Microsoft’s homegrown edgeHTML engine to Chromium. It gained quite a number of useful feature that helps it compete with other Chromium-based web browsers, including Google Chrome. Those features are coming into focus as Microsoft prepares for the upcoming academic year with a few bits and pieces that make Edge … Continue reading
Tom Snipes 2018-12-18
img

Building a web browser is no easy task, especially when your competition is seemingly playing dirty.

According to a former Microsoft intern working on the company’s Edge web browser, Google attempted to leverage code onto some of Microsoft’s most popular online platforms.

Software engineer Joshua Bakita explained why Microsoft chose to kill its EdgeHTML engine in favor of Chromium, and exactly how Google may have tried to trip up the Edge browser.

Microsoft recently announced that it would be switching the browser engine behind the Edge web browser from its custom EdgeHTML solution to Google’s Project Chromium.

The switch is an attempt to make the Edge browsing experience more reliable with the multitude of websites that are designed with a focus on Google’s Chrome web browser.

Bakita noted that one of the primary reasons behind the change was due to Google continually making changes to its sites that would break compatibility.

Ralph Philbrick 2018-12-19

A former Microsoft intern has revealed details of a YouTube incident that has convinced some Edge browser engineers that Google added code to purposely break compatibility.

In a post on Hacker News, Joshua Bakita, a former software engineering intern at Microsoft, lays out details and claims about an incident earlier this year.

Microsoft has since announced the company is moving from the EdgeHTML rendering engine to the open source Chromium project for its Edge browser.

Bakita explains that “one of the reasons we [Microsoft] decided to end EdgeHTML was because Google kept making changes to its sites that broke other browsers, and we couldn’t keep up.” Bakita claims that Google added a “hidden empty div over YouTube videos” that affected Microsoft’s hardware acceleration for videos.

“Prior to that, our fairly state-of-the-art video acceleration put us well ahead of Chrome on video playback time on battery, but almost the instant they broke things on YouTube, they started advertising Chrome’s dominance over Edge on video-watching battery life.”

The claims are surprising if they’re genuine, and they come months after a Mozilla program manager claimed a separate YouTube redesign made the site “5x slower in Firefox and Edge.” That incident led Edge, Safari, and Firefox users to revert to scripts to improve the YouTube experience.

Paul Williams 2018-12-07
img

Future versions of Edge would use Google’s Chromium rendering engine, which powers a swathe of browsers, including Chrome and Opera.

Edge was never a popular browser, and at the time of writing commands just 4.34 percent of the market, according to NetMarketShare.

Mozilla, the non-profit behind the Firefox browser, is deeply anxious about Microsoft’s recent move, and the inevitable prospect of handing more of the Internet to Google.

After all, this is the company that single-handedly reversed Microsoft’s monopoly of the browser market in the early 2000’s.

Although Mozilla acknowledges that giving up on Edge makes business sense for Microsoft, it states that the Redmond’s decision empowers Google to “single-handedly decide what possibilities are available to each one of us.”

“From a social, civic and individual empowerment perspective ceding control of fundamental online infrastructure to a single company is terrible,” wrote Mozilla CEO Chris Beard.

Carl Fox 2021-03-10
img
microsoft edge

Microsoft has announced the end of support for the classic non-chromium Edge Legacy browser. While Microsoft Edge on the proprietary EdgeHTML engine is included in ...

The post Microsoft has ended support for the classic non-chromium Edge browser appeared first on Gizchina.com.

Alfred Borrow 2016-12-14
img

Microsoft will offer the option to block Adobe Flash content from appearing in its Edge browser.

Microsoft said Wednesday that it has chosen a strategy for its Edge browser similar to that of Google Chrome.

Flash will be a click-to-play option in future builds, allowing users to turn it off entirely if they so wish.

For now, the new Flash-blocking capability will be limited to members of its Windows Insider program running Edge with EdgeHTML 15 within Windows 10.

According to Kyle Pflug, a communications manager for the Edge team, Insiders will be able to try it out in the next Insider build.

The days of Flash are over, and none too soon.

James Hammond 2018-12-04

Microsoft Edge has failed to capture the public’s attention since launching back in 2015, so you can’t really blame the company for switching tacks.

According to new reports that first surfaced in Windows Central, the browser isn’t not long for this world.

Microsoft could announce its replacement as early as this week.

As for what’s next for the Windows 10 default browser, the company is reportedly looking to Google for some help on that front.

The next-gen browser is said to find Microsoft swapping Edge’s EdgeHTML rending engine for Chromium.

All of this is still early stages for the project that has been floating around with the internal name “Anaheim,” but Internet Explorer’s replacement’s replacement will hopefully address some stability and compatibility issues that have hampered adoption.

Joshua Herbert 2019-08-27
img

Microsoft’s switch to a new Chromium-based version of Edge is well underway.

The company has been offering Edge Insiders access to weekly Developer and daily Canary builds of the new browser for several months, and recently unveiled a more stable beta channel build, updated every six weeks, aimed primarily at end-users.

It’s a well-though-out approach that signals a stable release sometime at the end of 2019 or the beginning of 2020.

Changing out your application’s browser controls

The change is significant in many ways: most importantly a separation of browser and operating system.

That link between the two had allowed the original EdgeHTML-powered version of Edge to slip behind its competitors, as it could only get significant updates twice a year, with Windows’ updates.

Thomas Cann 2018-12-04
img

It seems that Microsoft can never rid itself its web browser curse.

Although it became the most used browser in the world, Internet Explorer ended up also becoming its most unpopular.

Redmond tried to separate itself from the legacy with Microsoft Edge.

After no small amount of aggressive marketing and even intrusive tactics, it seems that Microsoft is ready to throw in the towel and build a new default browser for Windows 10, one built around the same rendering engine used by rival Google Chrome.

Microsoft tried to shed off Internet Explorer in the easiest way possible.

It started from scratch to create a browser and a rendering engine, EdgeHTML, that it swears is designed to be fast and light and secure.