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Lingyue Zhanag 2019-10-23

Blog U. S. & Entire world | Regional Politics Views Investigations Technology World D. C.,Md.

& Va.Sports Arts & Entertainment Internet business Climate & Environment Education and learning Food Health History Immigration Impeachment Question Lifestyle The Washington Posting Magazine National National Stability Obituaries Outlook Religion Scientific disciplines Transportation Weather By The way - Travel Carolyn Hax Mmorpgs The Lily Morning Combine Photography Podcasts Video Crosswords Reside Chats Newsletters & Signals Puzzles & Games Washington Article Live Jobs Classifieds WP BrandStudio washingtonpost.

com © 1996-2019 The Washington Post Terms involving Service Privacy Policy Submissions along with Discussion Policy RSS Terms of Service Ad Selections Democracy Dies in DarknessNewsletters & Alerts Product subscriptions Contact us Aid desk Skip to principal content Politics Impeachment Request White House Congress Polling That Trailer Fact Checker This Fix PowerPost White House whistleblower says 25 safety measures clearance denials were corrected during Trump administration Household Oversight and Reform Committee Seat Elijah Cummings (D-Md. )

speaks after a House Oversight Committee hearing on Capitol Hill throughout Washington.

(Jose Luis Magana/AP) Home Oversight and Reform Committee Lounge chair Elijah Cummings (D-Md. )

speaks throughout a House Oversight Committee experiencing on Capitol Hill with Washington.

collect
0
Marc Anderson 2016-08-25

MoreEpiPen auto-injection epinephrine pens manufactured by Mylan NV pharmaceutical company for use by severe allergy sufferers are seen in Washington, U.S., August 24, 2016.

By Ransdell Pierson and Ankur Banerjee

Reuters - Mylan NV said on Thursday it would reduce the out-of-pocket cost of its severe allergy treatment EpiPen through a discount programme, a day after Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton joined lawmakers in criticizing the drug's high price.

However, he added, "discounts for selected customers without lowering the overall price of EpiPens are insufficient, because the excessive price will likely be passed on through higher insurance premiums."

Clinton's view was echoed by Democratic lawmakers, including Rep. Elijah Cummings, who said Mylan's move is nothing but a public relations stunt that does nothing to help the majority of patients who need the drug.

Mylan Chief Executive Heather Bresch, defending EpiPen's price in an interview on Thursday on CNBC, said her company had spent hundreds of millions of dollars improving EpiPen, including making its needle invisible, since acquiring the device from German generic drugmaker Merck KGaA.

collect
0
Carl Dechant 2016-12-07

Republican and Democratic lawmakers say they plan to investigate Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, including the hacking of emails from Democratic political organizations and Hillary Clinton s campaign staff.

But their efforts face a strong headwind from President-elect Donald Trump, who has continued to deny that there is proof of Russia s involvement.

U.S. intelligence and homeland security officials said in a rare public statement in October that the computer intrusions were directed by Russia s senior-most officials in an unprecedented effort to interfere with the election.

For some lawmakers, significant questions remain about how the Russian government transferred stolen emails to WikiLeaks, where they were published in the homestretch of the campaign, as well as Moscow s role in the production of fabricated news stories that have littered the internet and appear intended to mislead voters.

During the campaign, Democrats pushed unsuccessfully for hearings on the Russian hacks.

Last summer, a senior European Union official said hundreds of disinformation websites had been spotted in Poland, the Czech Repubilc, Slovakia, and Hungary.

collect
0
Harvey Ayers 2019-05-22
img

Lawmakers are often divided on tech issues like data privacy, election security and platform censorship.

There's been increasing political pressure to reconsider the use facial recognition as research emerges that the technology is flawed and still being used without any regulations.

And it has a chilling effect on our total population," said Rep. Elijah Cummings, chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform.

The Democrat representing Maryland was not alone in his call to regulate the technology.

Multiple lawmakers during the committee's hearing on facial recognition Wednesday pointed to the technology's accuracy and bias issues, along with concerns about how the surveillance threatens people's civil liberties.

The only federal legislation on facial recognition so far is a bipartisan bill that limits how businesses can use that data, but there're no regulations on how government agencies can use it.

collect
0
Marshall Johnson 2016-07-14
img

Postal reform moves forward in the House

The 2016 Postal Service Reform Act was unanimously backed this week by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

Earlier attempts at reform have not received a vote in the House, and this measure mirrors a Senate bill which has languished without progress.

The bill, supported by both the Republican chairman and ranking Democratic members of the Committee Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Elijah Cummings, D-Md would reintroduce--but decrease--a temporary price increase which expired in April, and set the Postal Regulation Commission a 2018 target to review how postal pricing structure, taking into account customer and service considerations as well as economics.

It also makes new provisions for funding employees' retirement.

Opponents of the bill object to the increase in the postal rate.

collect
0
Donald Koontz 2017-09-16
img

Two US senators on Friday introduced legislation to set up the National Commission on the Cybersecurity of the United States Election Systems, to examine the possibility that people tried to hack the 2016 election.

The commission would examine the evidence to see if the Russians, or someone else, actively tried to hack the election process – either by altering results or interfering with electoral backend systems.

The members would draw up a series of recommendations to harden US election systems, according to the legislation's sponsors, Senators Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) and Lindsey Graham (R-SC).

"There is no credible doubt that Russia attacked our election infrastructure in 2016," said Gillibrand.

"We need to be able to defend ourselves against threats to our elections, our democracy, and our sacred right to vote.

I am proud to introduce this bipartisan legislation to create a 9/11-style Commission to defend our democracy and protect ourselves against future attacks on our country."

collect
0
Mark Alexander 2017-10-04
img

Last month, Allergan gave the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe six patents that protect Restasis, the company's blockbuster eye drug.

The goal is a sophisticated legal strategy to avoid having the US Patent Office proceed with a process called inter partes review, which is a kind of quasi-litigation in which opponents of a patent can try to have them revoked.

IPR proceedings against patents held by public universities have been canceled on at least two occasions, when the Patent Trial and Appeals Board held that the universities benefit from sovereign immunity because they are state actors.

The concept of gifting patents to Native American tribes looks alluring enough that patent-holding companies that routinely sue tech companies, often derided as "patent trolls," may be getting into it as well.

One such company has already given patents to a Native American tribe in order to sue Apple.

That move has drawn concern from the House Committee on Oversight and Government reform, which has sent a letter (PDF) to Allergan CEO Brenton Saunders demanding more information about the patent transfer.

collect
0
James Howard 2017-07-31
img

The commission hasn't revealed much about what it's doing to prevent future attacks, but it said in a letter last month that it was researching "additional solutions" to protect the comment system.

Democratic Leaders of the House Commerce and Oversight committees then asked Pai what those additional solutions are, but they didn't get much detail in return.

Talking about hardware also undermines security

The CIO's answers to lawmakers' questions were sent along with a letter from Pai to Reps. Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-N.J.), Elijah Cummings (D-Md.

), DeGette (D-Colo.), Robin Kelly (D-Ill.), and Gerald Connolly (D-Va.).

The letter is dated July 21, and it was posted to the FCC's website on July 28.

collect
0
Billy Haigh 2016-09-07
img

WASHINGTON AP — It was time to purge the hacker from the U.S. government's computers.

It lays out missed opportunities before the break-in at the Office of Personnel Management exposed security clearances, background checks and fingerprint records.

The report by the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform faulted the personnel agency for failing to secure sensitive data despite warnings for years that it was vulnerable to hackers.

"We had literally tens of millions of Americans whose data was stolen by a nefarious overseas actor, but it was entirely preventable," Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the committee chairman, said in an interview.

The committee's top Democrat, Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland, said he could not support the report because of "several key deficiencies."

That breach went undetected until April 2015, when an OPM contract employee discovered suspicious activity on the network.

collect
0
Everett Enriquez 2019-06-14
img

Multiple government agencies are relying on a security measure that can be easily bypassed thanks to massive breaches like Equifax's hack, the US Government Accountability Office found.

In a report from May, the government watchdog group found that the US Postal Service, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Social Security Administration and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services were still using "Knowledge-Based Verification" to make sure people who applied for benefits online were authentic.

This verification method asked applicants questions like their date of birth, Social Security numbers and addresses, assuming that only the applicant would have that information.

That exposed many federal agencies using Knowledge-Based Verification to widespread fraud, as potential attackers could use the stolen information to apply for benefits and get replacement Social Security cards, the GAO found.

While the IRS and the General Services Administration dropped Knowledge-Based Verification as a security measure, the GAO found four federal agencies that were still relying on it.

In letters to all four agencies, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.

collect
0
William Franklin 2017-11-15
img

Sinclair Broadcast is in the midst of buying Tribune Media, a move that would give it unparalleled control over local TV stations across the country.

The FCC on Thursday is set to vote on rules that would make it easier for the deal to get approved.

On Monday, Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. of New Jersey and Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland sent a letter to the inspector general of the FCC, David Hunt, seeking an investigation into whether FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has shown preferential treatment to Sinclair.

The letter comes after FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, a Democrat, called for an investigation into the relationship last month.

To help you make sense of what's been going on, CNET has put together this FAQ.

Why are people concerned about this deal?

collect
0
Ralph Knotts 2018-01-24
img

The US Government Accountability Office (GAO) will investigate the use of impersonation in public comments on the Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality repeal.

Congressional Democrats requested the investigation last month, and the GAO has granted the request.

While the investigation request was spurred by widespread fraud in the FCC's net neutrality repeal docket, Democrats asked the GAO to also "examine whether this shady practice extends to other agency rulemaking processes."

The GAO will do just that, having told Democrats in a letter that it will "review the extent and pervasiveness of fraud and the misuse of American identities during federal rulemaking processes."

"At the current time we anticipate that staff with the required skills will be available to initiate an engagement in about five months," the office said.

The GAO previously agreed to investigate DDoS attacks that allegedly targeted the FCC comment system, also in response to a request by Democratic lawmakers.

collect
0
Thomas Saeler 2016-12-07
img

The U.S. Capitol in Washington.

U.S. lawmakers are pushing for a government probe into whether Russia may have interfered with the presidential election by hacking high-profile political targets.

On Wednesday, two Democratic representatives unveiled legislation that proposes to form a 12-member bipartisan commission to investigate the electronic means Russia may have used to influence the U.S. election.

"Regardless of whether you voted for Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, or anyone else, Russia s attacks on our election are an attempt to degrade our democracy," said Representative Elijah Cummings of Maryland, one of the sponsors of the bill.

Back in October, U.S. intelligence agencies publicly blamed the Russian government for sponsoring several high-profile hacks designed to sway public opinion during the election cycle, however, no specific evidence was provided.

The hacks included a breach at the Democratic National Committee that stole sensitive emails, which were later leaked online.

collect
0
Scott Mayle 2019-05-24
img

San Francisco this month became the first US city to prohibit police from using facial recognition technology.

Municipalities mulling bans include San Francisco neighbors Oakland and Berkeley, and Somerville, Massachusetts.

In California, a push to ban facial recognition from being used in body cameras has made it to the state senate.

Lawmakers in Washington have proposed a statewide facial recognition bill.

Cagle says he's heard from state legislators "who are interested in seeing how this prohibition on face surveillance could be applied to body cameras first, or in schools."

The grassroots effort to curb facial recognition technology comes as police, stores and airports install systems to help them solve crimes, prevent shoplifting and speed boarding of flights and cruises.

collect
0
Jeff Lusk 2019-07-31

Twitter suspended an account that peddled conspiracy-laden content on Tuesday after President Donald Trump retweeted it earlier in the day, according to The Daily Beast.

The account, which operated under the display name “LYNN THOMAS,” was reportedly suspended for breaking Twitter’s rules against “using multiple accounts to artificially amplify or disrupt conversations.” It’s the second account that the president has retweeted that Twitter has suspended for violating its rules.

The tweet Trump retweeted said, in all caps, “DEMOCRATS ARE THE ONLY ONES INTERFERING IN OUR ELECTIONS.

WHY DO YOU THINK THEY SO STRONGLY OPPOSE VOTER ID?” It also included a brightly-colored image that said, “Democrats are the true enemies of America!”

According to The Daily Beast, the account was also pushing Qanon conspiracy theories and memes.

Other posts suggested that Democrats murder children in order to steal their “pineal glands.”

collect
0
William Hill 2016-12-19

WASHINGTON—A House committee has recommended Congress pass a new law to create national standards for how police officers and federal agents use powerful cellphone tracking technology in their investigations.

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee staffers issued a bipartisan report Monday, the result of a yearlong probe launched after The Wall Street Journal and others wrote about how investigators were scanning innocent people s cellphones without search warrants to try to find criminals.

Such devices have a variety of brand names or nicknames, including dirtbox, Stingray and Hailstorm.

The Journal reported in 2014 that the U.S.

Marshals used such devices in small Cessna airplanes around the country to hunt for fugitives.

The Journal also reported the Marshals developed the technology with help from the Central Intelligence Agency.

collect
0
Lingyue Zhanag 2019-10-23

Blog U. S. & Entire world | Regional Politics Views Investigations Technology World D. C.,Md.

& Va.Sports Arts & Entertainment Internet business Climate & Environment Education and learning Food Health History Immigration Impeachment Question Lifestyle The Washington Posting Magazine National National Stability Obituaries Outlook Religion Scientific disciplines Transportation Weather By The way - Travel Carolyn Hax Mmorpgs The Lily Morning Combine Photography Podcasts Video Crosswords Reside Chats Newsletters & Signals Puzzles & Games Washington Article Live Jobs Classifieds WP BrandStudio washingtonpost.

com © 1996-2019 The Washington Post Terms involving Service Privacy Policy Submissions along with Discussion Policy RSS Terms of Service Ad Selections Democracy Dies in DarknessNewsletters & Alerts Product subscriptions Contact us Aid desk Skip to principal content Politics Impeachment Request White House Congress Polling That Trailer Fact Checker This Fix PowerPost White House whistleblower says 25 safety measures clearance denials were corrected during Trump administration Household Oversight and Reform Committee Seat Elijah Cummings (D-Md. )

speaks after a House Oversight Committee hearing on Capitol Hill throughout Washington.

(Jose Luis Magana/AP) Home Oversight and Reform Committee Lounge chair Elijah Cummings (D-Md. )

speaks throughout a House Oversight Committee experiencing on Capitol Hill with Washington.

Carl Dechant 2016-12-07

Republican and Democratic lawmakers say they plan to investigate Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, including the hacking of emails from Democratic political organizations and Hillary Clinton s campaign staff.

But their efforts face a strong headwind from President-elect Donald Trump, who has continued to deny that there is proof of Russia s involvement.

U.S. intelligence and homeland security officials said in a rare public statement in October that the computer intrusions were directed by Russia s senior-most officials in an unprecedented effort to interfere with the election.

For some lawmakers, significant questions remain about how the Russian government transferred stolen emails to WikiLeaks, where they were published in the homestretch of the campaign, as well as Moscow s role in the production of fabricated news stories that have littered the internet and appear intended to mislead voters.

During the campaign, Democrats pushed unsuccessfully for hearings on the Russian hacks.

Last summer, a senior European Union official said hundreds of disinformation websites had been spotted in Poland, the Czech Repubilc, Slovakia, and Hungary.

Marshall Johnson 2016-07-14
img

Postal reform moves forward in the House

The 2016 Postal Service Reform Act was unanimously backed this week by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

Earlier attempts at reform have not received a vote in the House, and this measure mirrors a Senate bill which has languished without progress.

The bill, supported by both the Republican chairman and ranking Democratic members of the Committee Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Elijah Cummings, D-Md would reintroduce--but decrease--a temporary price increase which expired in April, and set the Postal Regulation Commission a 2018 target to review how postal pricing structure, taking into account customer and service considerations as well as economics.

It also makes new provisions for funding employees' retirement.

Opponents of the bill object to the increase in the postal rate.

Mark Alexander 2017-10-04
img

Last month, Allergan gave the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe six patents that protect Restasis, the company's blockbuster eye drug.

The goal is a sophisticated legal strategy to avoid having the US Patent Office proceed with a process called inter partes review, which is a kind of quasi-litigation in which opponents of a patent can try to have them revoked.

IPR proceedings against patents held by public universities have been canceled on at least two occasions, when the Patent Trial and Appeals Board held that the universities benefit from sovereign immunity because they are state actors.

The concept of gifting patents to Native American tribes looks alluring enough that patent-holding companies that routinely sue tech companies, often derided as "patent trolls," may be getting into it as well.

One such company has already given patents to a Native American tribe in order to sue Apple.

That move has drawn concern from the House Committee on Oversight and Government reform, which has sent a letter (PDF) to Allergan CEO Brenton Saunders demanding more information about the patent transfer.

Billy Haigh 2016-09-07
img

WASHINGTON AP — It was time to purge the hacker from the U.S. government's computers.

It lays out missed opportunities before the break-in at the Office of Personnel Management exposed security clearances, background checks and fingerprint records.

The report by the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform faulted the personnel agency for failing to secure sensitive data despite warnings for years that it was vulnerable to hackers.

"We had literally tens of millions of Americans whose data was stolen by a nefarious overseas actor, but it was entirely preventable," Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the committee chairman, said in an interview.

The committee's top Democrat, Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland, said he could not support the report because of "several key deficiencies."

That breach went undetected until April 2015, when an OPM contract employee discovered suspicious activity on the network.

William Franklin 2017-11-15
img

Sinclair Broadcast is in the midst of buying Tribune Media, a move that would give it unparalleled control over local TV stations across the country.

The FCC on Thursday is set to vote on rules that would make it easier for the deal to get approved.

On Monday, Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. of New Jersey and Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland sent a letter to the inspector general of the FCC, David Hunt, seeking an investigation into whether FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has shown preferential treatment to Sinclair.

The letter comes after FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, a Democrat, called for an investigation into the relationship last month.

To help you make sense of what's been going on, CNET has put together this FAQ.

Why are people concerned about this deal?

Thomas Saeler 2016-12-07
img

The U.S. Capitol in Washington.

U.S. lawmakers are pushing for a government probe into whether Russia may have interfered with the presidential election by hacking high-profile political targets.

On Wednesday, two Democratic representatives unveiled legislation that proposes to form a 12-member bipartisan commission to investigate the electronic means Russia may have used to influence the U.S. election.

"Regardless of whether you voted for Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, or anyone else, Russia s attacks on our election are an attempt to degrade our democracy," said Representative Elijah Cummings of Maryland, one of the sponsors of the bill.

Back in October, U.S. intelligence agencies publicly blamed the Russian government for sponsoring several high-profile hacks designed to sway public opinion during the election cycle, however, no specific evidence was provided.

The hacks included a breach at the Democratic National Committee that stole sensitive emails, which were later leaked online.

Jeff Lusk 2019-07-31

Twitter suspended an account that peddled conspiracy-laden content on Tuesday after President Donald Trump retweeted it earlier in the day, according to The Daily Beast.

The account, which operated under the display name “LYNN THOMAS,” was reportedly suspended for breaking Twitter’s rules against “using multiple accounts to artificially amplify or disrupt conversations.” It’s the second account that the president has retweeted that Twitter has suspended for violating its rules.

The tweet Trump retweeted said, in all caps, “DEMOCRATS ARE THE ONLY ONES INTERFERING IN OUR ELECTIONS.

WHY DO YOU THINK THEY SO STRONGLY OPPOSE VOTER ID?” It also included a brightly-colored image that said, “Democrats are the true enemies of America!”

According to The Daily Beast, the account was also pushing Qanon conspiracy theories and memes.

Other posts suggested that Democrats murder children in order to steal their “pineal glands.”

Marc Anderson 2016-08-25

MoreEpiPen auto-injection epinephrine pens manufactured by Mylan NV pharmaceutical company for use by severe allergy sufferers are seen in Washington, U.S., August 24, 2016.

By Ransdell Pierson and Ankur Banerjee

Reuters - Mylan NV said on Thursday it would reduce the out-of-pocket cost of its severe allergy treatment EpiPen through a discount programme, a day after Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton joined lawmakers in criticizing the drug's high price.

However, he added, "discounts for selected customers without lowering the overall price of EpiPens are insufficient, because the excessive price will likely be passed on through higher insurance premiums."

Clinton's view was echoed by Democratic lawmakers, including Rep. Elijah Cummings, who said Mylan's move is nothing but a public relations stunt that does nothing to help the majority of patients who need the drug.

Mylan Chief Executive Heather Bresch, defending EpiPen's price in an interview on Thursday on CNBC, said her company had spent hundreds of millions of dollars improving EpiPen, including making its needle invisible, since acquiring the device from German generic drugmaker Merck KGaA.

Harvey Ayers 2019-05-22
img

Lawmakers are often divided on tech issues like data privacy, election security and platform censorship.

There's been increasing political pressure to reconsider the use facial recognition as research emerges that the technology is flawed and still being used without any regulations.

And it has a chilling effect on our total population," said Rep. Elijah Cummings, chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform.

The Democrat representing Maryland was not alone in his call to regulate the technology.

Multiple lawmakers during the committee's hearing on facial recognition Wednesday pointed to the technology's accuracy and bias issues, along with concerns about how the surveillance threatens people's civil liberties.

The only federal legislation on facial recognition so far is a bipartisan bill that limits how businesses can use that data, but there're no regulations on how government agencies can use it.

Donald Koontz 2017-09-16
img

Two US senators on Friday introduced legislation to set up the National Commission on the Cybersecurity of the United States Election Systems, to examine the possibility that people tried to hack the 2016 election.

The commission would examine the evidence to see if the Russians, or someone else, actively tried to hack the election process – either by altering results or interfering with electoral backend systems.

The members would draw up a series of recommendations to harden US election systems, according to the legislation's sponsors, Senators Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) and Lindsey Graham (R-SC).

"There is no credible doubt that Russia attacked our election infrastructure in 2016," said Gillibrand.

"We need to be able to defend ourselves against threats to our elections, our democracy, and our sacred right to vote.

I am proud to introduce this bipartisan legislation to create a 9/11-style Commission to defend our democracy and protect ourselves against future attacks on our country."

James Howard 2017-07-31
img

The commission hasn't revealed much about what it's doing to prevent future attacks, but it said in a letter last month that it was researching "additional solutions" to protect the comment system.

Democratic Leaders of the House Commerce and Oversight committees then asked Pai what those additional solutions are, but they didn't get much detail in return.

Talking about hardware also undermines security

The CIO's answers to lawmakers' questions were sent along with a letter from Pai to Reps. Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-N.J.), Elijah Cummings (D-Md.

), DeGette (D-Colo.), Robin Kelly (D-Ill.), and Gerald Connolly (D-Va.).

The letter is dated July 21, and it was posted to the FCC's website on July 28.

Everett Enriquez 2019-06-14
img

Multiple government agencies are relying on a security measure that can be easily bypassed thanks to massive breaches like Equifax's hack, the US Government Accountability Office found.

In a report from May, the government watchdog group found that the US Postal Service, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Social Security Administration and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services were still using "Knowledge-Based Verification" to make sure people who applied for benefits online were authentic.

This verification method asked applicants questions like their date of birth, Social Security numbers and addresses, assuming that only the applicant would have that information.

That exposed many federal agencies using Knowledge-Based Verification to widespread fraud, as potential attackers could use the stolen information to apply for benefits and get replacement Social Security cards, the GAO found.

While the IRS and the General Services Administration dropped Knowledge-Based Verification as a security measure, the GAO found four federal agencies that were still relying on it.

In letters to all four agencies, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.

Ralph Knotts 2018-01-24
img

The US Government Accountability Office (GAO) will investigate the use of impersonation in public comments on the Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality repeal.

Congressional Democrats requested the investigation last month, and the GAO has granted the request.

While the investigation request was spurred by widespread fraud in the FCC's net neutrality repeal docket, Democrats asked the GAO to also "examine whether this shady practice extends to other agency rulemaking processes."

The GAO will do just that, having told Democrats in a letter that it will "review the extent and pervasiveness of fraud and the misuse of American identities during federal rulemaking processes."

"At the current time we anticipate that staff with the required skills will be available to initiate an engagement in about five months," the office said.

The GAO previously agreed to investigate DDoS attacks that allegedly targeted the FCC comment system, also in response to a request by Democratic lawmakers.

Scott Mayle 2019-05-24
img

San Francisco this month became the first US city to prohibit police from using facial recognition technology.

Municipalities mulling bans include San Francisco neighbors Oakland and Berkeley, and Somerville, Massachusetts.

In California, a push to ban facial recognition from being used in body cameras has made it to the state senate.

Lawmakers in Washington have proposed a statewide facial recognition bill.

Cagle says he's heard from state legislators "who are interested in seeing how this prohibition on face surveillance could be applied to body cameras first, or in schools."

The grassroots effort to curb facial recognition technology comes as police, stores and airports install systems to help them solve crimes, prevent shoplifting and speed boarding of flights and cruises.

William Hill 2016-12-19

WASHINGTON—A House committee has recommended Congress pass a new law to create national standards for how police officers and federal agents use powerful cellphone tracking technology in their investigations.

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee staffers issued a bipartisan report Monday, the result of a yearlong probe launched after The Wall Street Journal and others wrote about how investigators were scanning innocent people s cellphones without search warrants to try to find criminals.

Such devices have a variety of brand names or nicknames, including dirtbox, Stingray and Hailstorm.

The Journal reported in 2014 that the U.S.

Marshals used such devices in small Cessna airplanes around the country to hunt for fugitives.

The Journal also reported the Marshals developed the technology with help from the Central Intelligence Agency.