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Ben Wood 2022-06-28
img
The number of false positives can vary depending on the facial recognition technology used. The best face recognition algorithm has a 0. When used correctly, facial recognition has resulted in increased security functions, decreased crime, faster processing, and greater public convenience. However, there are concerns about the introduction of bias into facial recognition systems. Facebook recently announced that it will no longer use facial recognition to identify users on its platform.
collect
1
Jose Breland 2017-08-23
img

Teaching computers to better recognize hands holds the promise of making facial recognition technology even better.

As evidenced by Apple’s rumored plans to replace Touch ID with facial recognition technology for the iPhone 8, the ability of computers to seamlessly recognize faces is pretty darn impressive these days.

The technology is not infallible, however, and there are still things capable of tripping it up.

Hands covering faces, which represents a significant challenge, due to how often a particularly animated hand gesture accidentally obscures a speaker’s face.

Fortunately, computer science researchers are here to help.

What researchers from the University of Central Florida and Carnegie Mellon University have developed is a method of dealing with the so-called “facial occlusion” problem.

collect
0
William Figueroa 2017-09-11
img

There is no question that facial-recognition technology is getting better.

But what if a person tries to purposely obscure their identity by sporting a fake beard or giant sunglasses?

Up until now, that has been a lot harder for even smart facial-recognition systems to deal with.

This is where new technology developed by researchers from India and the U.K. hopes to address.

Engineers at India’s National Institute of Technology and Institute of Science and the U.K.’s University of Cambridge have developed a facial recognition framework that can identify even people who actively obscure their faces.

“This system can be used to identify a person even if they are disguised,” Amarjot Singh, from the University of Cambridge, told Digital Trends.

collect
0
Harvey Broughton 2017-09-03
img

As part of an effort to lure a younger generation of consumers, a health-focused KFC concept restaurant in China now lets you pay with your face.

The restaurant in the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou, called KPRO, is the first to house Alipay's facial recognition payment system, "Smile to Pay."

Alipay, established by the Alibaba Group, is one of the world's largest mobile payment platforms.

KPRO has partnered with Ant Financial, an Alibaba group affiliate that developed the technology.

But it's certainly not the first use of facial recognition for payment services.

Samsung, PayPal, MasterCard and NEC are among the firms that have been testing out the concept.

collect
0
Sandra Wilson 2017-09-20
img

Ever, maker of a consumer app for storing and organizing digital photos, is getting into the enterprise market.

Today, the company announced Ever AI, a set of APIs that are supposed to provide a wide variety of visual intelligence capabilities to companies that need them.

Companies will be able to use Ever AI for tasks like face verification (showing that one face matches another face), face identification (scoring how likely it is that one face matches other labeled faces), age detection, gender detection, and emotion detection.

The capabilities are available both through a self-hosted API that lets organizations use Ever’s software on their own infrastructure and through a mobile SDK that can bring those models to a smartphone.

All of this is based on Ever’s massive pool of more than 12 billion consumer photos uploaded through its app by the firm’s 11 million customers.

“We will never, to my knowledge or expectation, let the data out of our hands,” said Doug Aley, Ever’s chief revenue officer.

collect
0
Laurence Lafarge 2017-09-15
img

Computer applications and software are used to verify the user by analyzing a still picture or moving video frames of the user.

Like all systems, facial recognition systems work on algorithms.

This algorithm is developed taking your facial features such as the size of the forehead, grooves on the face, shape of the nose, height of the cheekbones and more into account.

The geometric algorithms aim to verify a face by distinguishing particular facial features, for example, circular eyes or an elongated nose.

The photometric algorithms use a statistical approach which distills an image into values.

These values are then compared with the probe photos or templates which were initially uploaded by the user.

collect
0
Daniel Slye 2017-11-09
img

The results are in from the biggest computer face-recognition contest to date.

Everyone from government agencies to police forces are looking for software to track us in airports or spot us in CCTV images.

But much of this technology is developed behind closed doors – how can we know if any of it really works?

To answer this question, the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) and the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have been running the biggest face-recognition competition to date.

The Face Recognition Prize Challenge tested two tasks: face verification and face search.

Face verification is what phone manufacturers such as Apple – whose iPhone X, out last week, can be unlocked with your face – are trying to master.

collect
0
Michael Ambriz 2017-12-20
img

Frequent flyers will be familiar with the growing use of e-passport gates at airports around the world – but 2018 could be the year that facial recognition technology stops becoming a novelty and enters the mainstream.

For retail and consumer goods brands, facial recognition has the potential to transform the payment process.

The introduction of the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May looms large on the horizon, presenting businesses with the biggest adjustment in data protection laws since the Data Protection Act 1998.

While GDPR is not exactly a trend, it’s likely to be weighing on the mind of every marketer and should be top of their agenda in 2018.

GDPR is a new set of standards designed to give individuals greater control over their personal data – a timely intervention amid a growing number of data hacks this year, from Uber to Wonga.

All companies possessing customer data will be required to meet strict regulations, or face hefty fines of up to €20m or 4% of annual global income.

collect
0
Troy Schindler 2016-12-07
img

You were so young and vibrant and full of life.

You had that thing you were going to do but then never did.

You probably dreamed of what the world might look like in 10 years' time — filled with technological wonders and exciting opportunities.

Well, it s 10 years later.

Brian Williams ran a segment on NBC back in 2007 about the futuristic year 2017.

And I have to say that it s pretty depressing.

collect
0
James Woodson 2017-11-15
img

Tech companies are eyeing the next frontier: the human face.

And at least one in four police departments in the US have access to facial recognition software to help them identify suspects.

In order for software to always recognize your face as you, an entire sequence of algorithms has to work.

When they teach face recognition software about race, gender, and age, it can often perform certain tasks better.

“This is not a surprising result,” says biometrics researcher Anil Jain of Michigan State University, “that if you model subpopulations separately you’ll get better results.” With better algorithms, maybe that cop won’t arrest the wrong person.

Great news for everybody, right?

collect
0
James Finch 2016-12-07

You were so young and vibrant and full of life.

You had that thing you were going to do but then never did.

You probably dreamed of what the world might look like in ten years time—filled with technological wonders and exciting opportunities.

Well, it s ten years later.

Brian Williams ran a segment on NBC back in 2007 about the futuristic year 2017.

And I have to say that it s pretty depressing.

collect
0
Eric Whitefield 2017-12-27
img

The 2020 Tokyo Olympics will heavily rely on facial recognition technology for security purposes, according to sources who say the tech will ultimately scan up to 400,000 faces during the event.

The technology will be primarily used for getting athletes and journalists to their destinations quickly, the sources claim, with the overall system making it more difficult for stolen or forged credentials to be used for access.

The information comes from sources speaking to The Japan Times, which says its sources are close to the Olympics organizing committee.

The facial recognition system is primarily being pushed out of terrorism concerns, the sources claim, but may have the added benefit of reducing wait times.

Whereas an identification card can be stolen or forged, a face can’t trick a system trained to recognize it.

Individuals “involved with the games” will be given special ID cards with facial images, according to the sources; this will include journalists and other media personnel.

collect
0
Thomas Musick 2017-09-06

Facial recognition technology is under development that’s capable of identifying someone even if their face is covered up — and it could mean that staying anonymous in public will be harder than ever before.

The topic was raised this week after research published on the preprint server arXiv describing just such a system was shared in a popular AI newsletter.

Academic and sociologist Zeynep Tufekci shared the work on Twitter, noting that such technology could become a tool of oppression, with authoritarian states using it to identify anonymous protestors and stifle dissent.

The paper itself needs to be taken with a pinch of salt, though.

Its results were far less accurate than industry-level standards (when someone was wearing a cap, sunglasses, and a scarf, for example, the system could only identify them 55 percent of the time); it used a small dataset; and experts in the field have criticized its methodology.

“It doesn’t strike me as a particularly good paper,” Patrik Huber, a researcher at the University of Surrey who specializes in face tracking and analysis, told The Verge.

collect
0
William Franklin 2017-05-04
img

p Most smart-home hubs are plastic cubes that might have a few extra functions but aren’t necessarily something you want to prominently display.

Morpheus Team wants its Momo to function as a hub and lamp that also works as a sensor-filled security camera with artificial intelligence and facial recognition.

As a hub, it will also control smart-home devices from Nest, Philips Hue, and others, as well as work with Amazon’s Alexa and Google Home — though it also has its own voice activation.

The Momo also boasts microphones and speakers.

“Momo voice activation is independent and onboard (not cloud),” Edoardo Scarso, founder and CEO of Morpheus, told Digital Trends.

“This means that when Momo has learned an activity the user performs with a certain degree of consistency, they will suggest the ‘automation,’” said Scarso.

collect
0
Jason Hill 2017-12-01
img

Facebook knows everything about you and your personal lifestyle – including what you like to purchase when on a shopping spree.

Consumer tracking and Minority Report-style facial recognition is also becoming commonplace, often used to judge, typically in real time, the emotions and behavioural tics of passers-by.

And based on a patent filing published November, Facebook is developing such a tool.

It aims to improve "service to visiting customers" by "systematically and intelligently" identifying their needs.

The data can then be fed directly to management and staffers to enable better assistance, the filing said.

While it could boost efficiency, some academics have warned it could be seen as an invasion of privacy.

collect
0
Robert Woodward 2017-12-26
img

While the jury is still out on the extent to which facial recognition technology will be used globally years from now, many tech firms are continuing to push ahead with its development, with big players like Apple going so far as to incorporate it into its flagship iPhone X handset.

Now the organizing committee of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics is taking notice of the technology, and wants to use it on a huge scale at the global sporting extravaganza, sources told the Japan Times recently.

Developed by NEC Corp., the committee said the system would aid security by eliminating the problem of forged or stolen ID cards, and also speed up the flow of athletes, officials, and media personnel entering the various venues.

It’s estimated the system will manage up to 400,000 people, marking the biggest ever deployment of facial recognition technology at an Olympic Games.

To set up the system, photos of faces will need to be submitted to a database so the technology can compare them with the faces of athletes and workers when they arrive at a venue.

The logistics of the system have been deemed too challenging to operate for spectators, who will be asked to show their tickets at venue entrances as usual.

collect
0
Ben Wood 2022-06-28
img
The number of false positives can vary depending on the facial recognition technology used. The best face recognition algorithm has a 0. When used correctly, facial recognition has resulted in increased security functions, decreased crime, faster processing, and greater public convenience. However, there are concerns about the introduction of bias into facial recognition systems. Facebook recently announced that it will no longer use facial recognition to identify users on its platform.
William Figueroa 2017-09-11
img

There is no question that facial-recognition technology is getting better.

But what if a person tries to purposely obscure their identity by sporting a fake beard or giant sunglasses?

Up until now, that has been a lot harder for even smart facial-recognition systems to deal with.

This is where new technology developed by researchers from India and the U.K. hopes to address.

Engineers at India’s National Institute of Technology and Institute of Science and the U.K.’s University of Cambridge have developed a facial recognition framework that can identify even people who actively obscure their faces.

“This system can be used to identify a person even if they are disguised,” Amarjot Singh, from the University of Cambridge, told Digital Trends.

Sandra Wilson 2017-09-20
img

Ever, maker of a consumer app for storing and organizing digital photos, is getting into the enterprise market.

Today, the company announced Ever AI, a set of APIs that are supposed to provide a wide variety of visual intelligence capabilities to companies that need them.

Companies will be able to use Ever AI for tasks like face verification (showing that one face matches another face), face identification (scoring how likely it is that one face matches other labeled faces), age detection, gender detection, and emotion detection.

The capabilities are available both through a self-hosted API that lets organizations use Ever’s software on their own infrastructure and through a mobile SDK that can bring those models to a smartphone.

All of this is based on Ever’s massive pool of more than 12 billion consumer photos uploaded through its app by the firm’s 11 million customers.

“We will never, to my knowledge or expectation, let the data out of our hands,” said Doug Aley, Ever’s chief revenue officer.

Daniel Slye 2017-11-09
img

The results are in from the biggest computer face-recognition contest to date.

Everyone from government agencies to police forces are looking for software to track us in airports or spot us in CCTV images.

But much of this technology is developed behind closed doors – how can we know if any of it really works?

To answer this question, the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) and the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have been running the biggest face-recognition competition to date.

The Face Recognition Prize Challenge tested two tasks: face verification and face search.

Face verification is what phone manufacturers such as Apple – whose iPhone X, out last week, can be unlocked with your face – are trying to master.

Troy Schindler 2016-12-07
img

You were so young and vibrant and full of life.

You had that thing you were going to do but then never did.

You probably dreamed of what the world might look like in 10 years' time — filled with technological wonders and exciting opportunities.

Well, it s 10 years later.

Brian Williams ran a segment on NBC back in 2007 about the futuristic year 2017.

And I have to say that it s pretty depressing.

James Finch 2016-12-07

You were so young and vibrant and full of life.

You had that thing you were going to do but then never did.

You probably dreamed of what the world might look like in ten years time—filled with technological wonders and exciting opportunities.

Well, it s ten years later.

Brian Williams ran a segment on NBC back in 2007 about the futuristic year 2017.

And I have to say that it s pretty depressing.

Thomas Musick 2017-09-06

Facial recognition technology is under development that’s capable of identifying someone even if their face is covered up — and it could mean that staying anonymous in public will be harder than ever before.

The topic was raised this week after research published on the preprint server arXiv describing just such a system was shared in a popular AI newsletter.

Academic and sociologist Zeynep Tufekci shared the work on Twitter, noting that such technology could become a tool of oppression, with authoritarian states using it to identify anonymous protestors and stifle dissent.

The paper itself needs to be taken with a pinch of salt, though.

Its results were far less accurate than industry-level standards (when someone was wearing a cap, sunglasses, and a scarf, for example, the system could only identify them 55 percent of the time); it used a small dataset; and experts in the field have criticized its methodology.

“It doesn’t strike me as a particularly good paper,” Patrik Huber, a researcher at the University of Surrey who specializes in face tracking and analysis, told The Verge.

Jason Hill 2017-12-01
img

Facebook knows everything about you and your personal lifestyle – including what you like to purchase when on a shopping spree.

Consumer tracking and Minority Report-style facial recognition is also becoming commonplace, often used to judge, typically in real time, the emotions and behavioural tics of passers-by.

And based on a patent filing published November, Facebook is developing such a tool.

It aims to improve "service to visiting customers" by "systematically and intelligently" identifying their needs.

The data can then be fed directly to management and staffers to enable better assistance, the filing said.

While it could boost efficiency, some academics have warned it could be seen as an invasion of privacy.

Jose Breland 2017-08-23
img

Teaching computers to better recognize hands holds the promise of making facial recognition technology even better.

As evidenced by Apple’s rumored plans to replace Touch ID with facial recognition technology for the iPhone 8, the ability of computers to seamlessly recognize faces is pretty darn impressive these days.

The technology is not infallible, however, and there are still things capable of tripping it up.

Hands covering faces, which represents a significant challenge, due to how often a particularly animated hand gesture accidentally obscures a speaker’s face.

Fortunately, computer science researchers are here to help.

What researchers from the University of Central Florida and Carnegie Mellon University have developed is a method of dealing with the so-called “facial occlusion” problem.

Harvey Broughton 2017-09-03
img

As part of an effort to lure a younger generation of consumers, a health-focused KFC concept restaurant in China now lets you pay with your face.

The restaurant in the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou, called KPRO, is the first to house Alipay's facial recognition payment system, "Smile to Pay."

Alipay, established by the Alibaba Group, is one of the world's largest mobile payment platforms.

KPRO has partnered with Ant Financial, an Alibaba group affiliate that developed the technology.

But it's certainly not the first use of facial recognition for payment services.

Samsung, PayPal, MasterCard and NEC are among the firms that have been testing out the concept.

Laurence Lafarge 2017-09-15
img

Computer applications and software are used to verify the user by analyzing a still picture or moving video frames of the user.

Like all systems, facial recognition systems work on algorithms.

This algorithm is developed taking your facial features such as the size of the forehead, grooves on the face, shape of the nose, height of the cheekbones and more into account.

The geometric algorithms aim to verify a face by distinguishing particular facial features, for example, circular eyes or an elongated nose.

The photometric algorithms use a statistical approach which distills an image into values.

These values are then compared with the probe photos or templates which were initially uploaded by the user.

Michael Ambriz 2017-12-20
img

Frequent flyers will be familiar with the growing use of e-passport gates at airports around the world – but 2018 could be the year that facial recognition technology stops becoming a novelty and enters the mainstream.

For retail and consumer goods brands, facial recognition has the potential to transform the payment process.

The introduction of the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May looms large on the horizon, presenting businesses with the biggest adjustment in data protection laws since the Data Protection Act 1998.

While GDPR is not exactly a trend, it’s likely to be weighing on the mind of every marketer and should be top of their agenda in 2018.

GDPR is a new set of standards designed to give individuals greater control over their personal data – a timely intervention amid a growing number of data hacks this year, from Uber to Wonga.

All companies possessing customer data will be required to meet strict regulations, or face hefty fines of up to €20m or 4% of annual global income.

James Woodson 2017-11-15
img

Tech companies are eyeing the next frontier: the human face.

And at least one in four police departments in the US have access to facial recognition software to help them identify suspects.

In order for software to always recognize your face as you, an entire sequence of algorithms has to work.

When they teach face recognition software about race, gender, and age, it can often perform certain tasks better.

“This is not a surprising result,” says biometrics researcher Anil Jain of Michigan State University, “that if you model subpopulations separately you’ll get better results.” With better algorithms, maybe that cop won’t arrest the wrong person.

Great news for everybody, right?

Eric Whitefield 2017-12-27
img

The 2020 Tokyo Olympics will heavily rely on facial recognition technology for security purposes, according to sources who say the tech will ultimately scan up to 400,000 faces during the event.

The technology will be primarily used for getting athletes and journalists to their destinations quickly, the sources claim, with the overall system making it more difficult for stolen or forged credentials to be used for access.

The information comes from sources speaking to The Japan Times, which says its sources are close to the Olympics organizing committee.

The facial recognition system is primarily being pushed out of terrorism concerns, the sources claim, but may have the added benefit of reducing wait times.

Whereas an identification card can be stolen or forged, a face can’t trick a system trained to recognize it.

Individuals “involved with the games” will be given special ID cards with facial images, according to the sources; this will include journalists and other media personnel.

William Franklin 2017-05-04
img

p Most smart-home hubs are plastic cubes that might have a few extra functions but aren’t necessarily something you want to prominently display.

Morpheus Team wants its Momo to function as a hub and lamp that also works as a sensor-filled security camera with artificial intelligence and facial recognition.

As a hub, it will also control smart-home devices from Nest, Philips Hue, and others, as well as work with Amazon’s Alexa and Google Home — though it also has its own voice activation.

The Momo also boasts microphones and speakers.

“Momo voice activation is independent and onboard (not cloud),” Edoardo Scarso, founder and CEO of Morpheus, told Digital Trends.

“This means that when Momo has learned an activity the user performs with a certain degree of consistency, they will suggest the ‘automation,’” said Scarso.

Robert Woodward 2017-12-26
img

While the jury is still out on the extent to which facial recognition technology will be used globally years from now, many tech firms are continuing to push ahead with its development, with big players like Apple going so far as to incorporate it into its flagship iPhone X handset.

Now the organizing committee of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics is taking notice of the technology, and wants to use it on a huge scale at the global sporting extravaganza, sources told the Japan Times recently.

Developed by NEC Corp., the committee said the system would aid security by eliminating the problem of forged or stolen ID cards, and also speed up the flow of athletes, officials, and media personnel entering the various venues.

It’s estimated the system will manage up to 400,000 people, marking the biggest ever deployment of facial recognition technology at an Olympic Games.

To set up the system, photos of faces will need to be submitted to a database so the technology can compare them with the faces of athletes and workers when they arrive at a venue.

The logistics of the system have been deemed too challenging to operate for spectators, who will be asked to show their tickets at venue entrances as usual.