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James Finch 2016-12-07

You were so young and vibrant and full of life.

You had that thing you were going to do but then never did.

You probably dreamed of what the world might look like in ten years time—filled with technological wonders and exciting opportunities.

Well, it s ten years later.

Brian Williams ran a segment on NBC back in 2007 about the futuristic year 2017.

And I have to say that it s pretty depressing.

collect
0
Paul Cork 2017-01-04
img

A start-up has unveiled a self-driving electric car that it says can accelerate at a faster pace than Tesla's top model.

Faraday Future's FF91 also features facial recognition technology allowing it to adjust its settings depending on who is behind the wheel.

But some attendees at the launch had doubts it would go on sale as planned, as Dave Lee reports.

collect
0
James Woodson 2017-11-15
img

Tech companies are eyeing the next frontier: the human face.

And at least one in four police departments in the US have access to facial recognition software to help them identify suspects.

In order for software to always recognize your face as you, an entire sequence of algorithms has to work.

When they teach face recognition software about race, gender, and age, it can often perform certain tasks better.

“This is not a surprising result,” says biometrics researcher Anil Jain of Michigan State University, “that if you model subpopulations separately you’ll get better results.” With better algorithms, maybe that cop won’t arrest the wrong person.

Great news for everybody, right?

collect
0
Daniel Slye 2017-11-09
img

The results are in from the biggest computer face-recognition contest to date.

Everyone from government agencies to police forces are looking for software to track us in airports or spot us in CCTV images.

But much of this technology is developed behind closed doors – how can we know if any of it really works?

To answer this question, the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) and the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have been running the biggest face-recognition competition to date.

The Face Recognition Prize Challenge tested two tasks: face verification and face search.

Face verification is what phone manufacturers such as Apple – whose iPhone X, out last week, can be unlocked with your face – are trying to master.

collect
0
Michael Ambriz 2017-12-20
img

Frequent flyers will be familiar with the growing use of e-passport gates at airports around the world – but 2018 could be the year that facial recognition technology stops becoming a novelty and enters the mainstream.

For retail and consumer goods brands, facial recognition has the potential to transform the payment process.

The introduction of the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May looms large on the horizon, presenting businesses with the biggest adjustment in data protection laws since the Data Protection Act 1998.

While GDPR is not exactly a trend, it’s likely to be weighing on the mind of every marketer and should be top of their agenda in 2018.

GDPR is a new set of standards designed to give individuals greater control over their personal data – a timely intervention amid a growing number of data hacks this year, from Uber to Wonga.

All companies possessing customer data will be required to meet strict regulations, or face hefty fines of up to €20m or 4% of annual global income.

collect
0
Troy Schindler 2016-12-07
img

You were so young and vibrant and full of life.

You had that thing you were going to do but then never did.

You probably dreamed of what the world might look like in 10 years' time — filled with technological wonders and exciting opportunities.

Well, it s 10 years later.

Brian Williams ran a segment on NBC back in 2007 about the futuristic year 2017.

And I have to say that it s pretty depressing.

collect
0
Sandra Wilson 2017-09-20
img

Ever, maker of a consumer app for storing and organizing digital photos, is getting into the enterprise market.

Today, the company announced Ever AI, a set of APIs that are supposed to provide a wide variety of visual intelligence capabilities to companies that need them.

Companies will be able to use Ever AI for tasks like face verification (showing that one face matches another face), face identification (scoring how likely it is that one face matches other labeled faces), age detection, gender detection, and emotion detection.

The capabilities are available both through a self-hosted API that lets organizations use Ever’s software on their own infrastructure and through a mobile SDK that can bring those models to a smartphone.

All of this is based on Ever’s massive pool of more than 12 billion consumer photos uploaded through its app by the firm’s 11 million customers.

“We will never, to my knowledge or expectation, let the data out of our hands,” said Doug Aley, Ever’s chief revenue officer.

collect
0
Laurence Lafarge 2017-09-15
img

Computer applications and software are used to verify the user by analyzing a still picture or moving video frames of the user.

Like all systems, facial recognition systems work on algorithms.

This algorithm is developed taking your facial features such as the size of the forehead, grooves on the face, shape of the nose, height of the cheekbones and more into account.

The geometric algorithms aim to verify a face by distinguishing particular facial features, for example, circular eyes or an elongated nose.

The photometric algorithms use a statistical approach which distills an image into values.

These values are then compared with the probe photos or templates which were initially uploaded by the user.

collect
0
Jose Breland 2017-08-23
img

Teaching computers to better recognize hands holds the promise of making facial recognition technology even better.

As evidenced by Apple’s rumored plans to replace Touch ID with facial recognition technology for the iPhone 8, the ability of computers to seamlessly recognize faces is pretty darn impressive these days.

The technology is not infallible, however, and there are still things capable of tripping it up.

Hands covering faces, which represents a significant challenge, due to how often a particularly animated hand gesture accidentally obscures a speaker’s face.

Fortunately, computer science researchers are here to help.

What researchers from the University of Central Florida and Carnegie Mellon University have developed is a method of dealing with the so-called “facial occlusion” problem.

collect
0
William Figueroa 2017-09-11
img

There is no question that facial-recognition technology is getting better.

But what if a person tries to purposely obscure their identity by sporting a fake beard or giant sunglasses?

Up until now, that has been a lot harder for even smart facial-recognition systems to deal with.

This is where new technology developed by researchers from India and the U.K. hopes to address.

Engineers at India’s National Institute of Technology and Institute of Science and the U.K.’s University of Cambridge have developed a facial recognition framework that can identify even people who actively obscure their faces.

“This system can be used to identify a person even if they are disguised,” Amarjot Singh, from the University of Cambridge, told Digital Trends.

collect
0
Harvey Broughton 2017-09-03
img

As part of an effort to lure a younger generation of consumers, a health-focused KFC concept restaurant in China now lets you pay with your face.

The restaurant in the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou, called KPRO, is the first to house Alipay's facial recognition payment system, "Smile to Pay."

Alipay, established by the Alibaba Group, is one of the world's largest mobile payment platforms.

KPRO has partnered with Ant Financial, an Alibaba group affiliate that developed the technology.

But it's certainly not the first use of facial recognition for payment services.

Samsung, PayPal, MasterCard and NEC are among the firms that have been testing out the concept.

collect
0
Clarence Cohen 2017-09-07

AI and facial recognition are combining for useful things, like unlocking your phone and boarding a airplane.

But of course there’s a sinister side to all those cameras scanning your face – as shown recently in China.

Sign up for an account and get the latest & best stories in your inbox, every day.

Steven's interested in ecommerce, mobile, smartphone adoption, gadgets, social media, transportation, and cars.

If you have any tips or feedback, contact him on Twitter: @sirsteven

collect
0
Henry Lawrence 2017-10-11
img

As the old saying goes, a smile costs nothing but gives so much.

In the future, it will offer a lot more, including everything from the ability to fly across the country to the means to purchase fried chicken.

The Alibaba-owned Alipay, a mobile app used by 120 million people in China, lets you transfer money using facial recognition as a verifier.

In early September, Alibaba’s Ant Financial unit also launched face-based payment with KFC.

For Chinese consumers, this means that they can leave their wallets and their smartphones at home.

Of course, it also means that the government has a means to track their identities.

collect
0
Jeffrey Zambrana 2017-12-19
img

Facebook has used facial recognition technology since 2010 to help you tag yourself and friends in photos, but not everyone’s cool with the company’s eerily accurate algorithm (which is only getting better).

According to an announcement today, Facebook will soon make it much simpler to stop it from spotting your face altogether.

Previously, you could disable auto-tagging suggestions by going into the ‘Timeline and Tagging’ section of Settings, but it’s phrased rather unclearly: “Who sees tag suggestions when photos that look like you are uploaded?”

Most people probably wouldn’t be able to immediately tell that was the setting they were looking for.

The new setting simply reads “Do you want Facebook to be able to recognize you in photos and videos,” with a yes/no toggle.

If you don’t mind Facebook’s face recognition, the company will now alert you when a photo of you is uploaded onto its platform, as well as use this technology to help visually impaired users identify their friends without the need for tagging.

collect
0
Ralph Miller 2017-07-25
img

A facial recognition system designed to replace the need for tickets on trains is being tested in the UK.

An early version that uses two near-infrared lights to help a single camera determine texture and orientation of each pixel it captures was shown to BBC Click.

The system, being developed by the Bristol Robotics Lab, is being partly funded by government and the private sector.

Researchers told the programme that they believe it will successfully identify passengers without the need for them to stop walking and could replace ticket gates.

This week BBC News is taking a close look at all aspects of cyber-security.

The coverage is timed to coincide with the two biggest shows in the security calendar - Black Hat and Def Con.

collect
0
Thomas Musick 2017-09-06

Facial recognition technology is under development that’s capable of identifying someone even if their face is covered up — and it could mean that staying anonymous in public will be harder than ever before.

The topic was raised this week after research published on the preprint server arXiv describing just such a system was shared in a popular AI newsletter.

Academic and sociologist Zeynep Tufekci shared the work on Twitter, noting that such technology could become a tool of oppression, with authoritarian states using it to identify anonymous protestors and stifle dissent.

The paper itself needs to be taken with a pinch of salt, though.

Its results were far less accurate than industry-level standards (when someone was wearing a cap, sunglasses, and a scarf, for example, the system could only identify them 55 percent of the time); it used a small dataset; and experts in the field have criticized its methodology.

“It doesn’t strike me as a particularly good paper,” Patrik Huber, a researcher at the University of Surrey who specializes in face tracking and analysis, told The Verge.

collect
0
James Finch 2016-12-07

You were so young and vibrant and full of life.

You had that thing you were going to do but then never did.

You probably dreamed of what the world might look like in ten years time—filled with technological wonders and exciting opportunities.

Well, it s ten years later.

Brian Williams ran a segment on NBC back in 2007 about the futuristic year 2017.

And I have to say that it s pretty depressing.

James Woodson 2017-11-15
img

Tech companies are eyeing the next frontier: the human face.

And at least one in four police departments in the US have access to facial recognition software to help them identify suspects.

In order for software to always recognize your face as you, an entire sequence of algorithms has to work.

When they teach face recognition software about race, gender, and age, it can often perform certain tasks better.

“This is not a surprising result,” says biometrics researcher Anil Jain of Michigan State University, “that if you model subpopulations separately you’ll get better results.” With better algorithms, maybe that cop won’t arrest the wrong person.

Great news for everybody, right?

Michael Ambriz 2017-12-20
img

Frequent flyers will be familiar with the growing use of e-passport gates at airports around the world – but 2018 could be the year that facial recognition technology stops becoming a novelty and enters the mainstream.

For retail and consumer goods brands, facial recognition has the potential to transform the payment process.

The introduction of the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May looms large on the horizon, presenting businesses with the biggest adjustment in data protection laws since the Data Protection Act 1998.

While GDPR is not exactly a trend, it’s likely to be weighing on the mind of every marketer and should be top of their agenda in 2018.

GDPR is a new set of standards designed to give individuals greater control over their personal data – a timely intervention amid a growing number of data hacks this year, from Uber to Wonga.

All companies possessing customer data will be required to meet strict regulations, or face hefty fines of up to €20m or 4% of annual global income.

Sandra Wilson 2017-09-20
img

Ever, maker of a consumer app for storing and organizing digital photos, is getting into the enterprise market.

Today, the company announced Ever AI, a set of APIs that are supposed to provide a wide variety of visual intelligence capabilities to companies that need them.

Companies will be able to use Ever AI for tasks like face verification (showing that one face matches another face), face identification (scoring how likely it is that one face matches other labeled faces), age detection, gender detection, and emotion detection.

The capabilities are available both through a self-hosted API that lets organizations use Ever’s software on their own infrastructure and through a mobile SDK that can bring those models to a smartphone.

All of this is based on Ever’s massive pool of more than 12 billion consumer photos uploaded through its app by the firm’s 11 million customers.

“We will never, to my knowledge or expectation, let the data out of our hands,” said Doug Aley, Ever’s chief revenue officer.

Jose Breland 2017-08-23
img

Teaching computers to better recognize hands holds the promise of making facial recognition technology even better.

As evidenced by Apple’s rumored plans to replace Touch ID with facial recognition technology for the iPhone 8, the ability of computers to seamlessly recognize faces is pretty darn impressive these days.

The technology is not infallible, however, and there are still things capable of tripping it up.

Hands covering faces, which represents a significant challenge, due to how often a particularly animated hand gesture accidentally obscures a speaker’s face.

Fortunately, computer science researchers are here to help.

What researchers from the University of Central Florida and Carnegie Mellon University have developed is a method of dealing with the so-called “facial occlusion” problem.

Harvey Broughton 2017-09-03
img

As part of an effort to lure a younger generation of consumers, a health-focused KFC concept restaurant in China now lets you pay with your face.

The restaurant in the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou, called KPRO, is the first to house Alipay's facial recognition payment system, "Smile to Pay."

Alipay, established by the Alibaba Group, is one of the world's largest mobile payment platforms.

KPRO has partnered with Ant Financial, an Alibaba group affiliate that developed the technology.

But it's certainly not the first use of facial recognition for payment services.

Samsung, PayPal, MasterCard and NEC are among the firms that have been testing out the concept.

Henry Lawrence 2017-10-11
img

As the old saying goes, a smile costs nothing but gives so much.

In the future, it will offer a lot more, including everything from the ability to fly across the country to the means to purchase fried chicken.

The Alibaba-owned Alipay, a mobile app used by 120 million people in China, lets you transfer money using facial recognition as a verifier.

In early September, Alibaba’s Ant Financial unit also launched face-based payment with KFC.

For Chinese consumers, this means that they can leave their wallets and their smartphones at home.

Of course, it also means that the government has a means to track their identities.

Ralph Miller 2017-07-25
img

A facial recognition system designed to replace the need for tickets on trains is being tested in the UK.

An early version that uses two near-infrared lights to help a single camera determine texture and orientation of each pixel it captures was shown to BBC Click.

The system, being developed by the Bristol Robotics Lab, is being partly funded by government and the private sector.

Researchers told the programme that they believe it will successfully identify passengers without the need for them to stop walking and could replace ticket gates.

This week BBC News is taking a close look at all aspects of cyber-security.

The coverage is timed to coincide with the two biggest shows in the security calendar - Black Hat and Def Con.

Paul Cork 2017-01-04
img

A start-up has unveiled a self-driving electric car that it says can accelerate at a faster pace than Tesla's top model.

Faraday Future's FF91 also features facial recognition technology allowing it to adjust its settings depending on who is behind the wheel.

But some attendees at the launch had doubts it would go on sale as planned, as Dave Lee reports.

Daniel Slye 2017-11-09
img

The results are in from the biggest computer face-recognition contest to date.

Everyone from government agencies to police forces are looking for software to track us in airports or spot us in CCTV images.

But much of this technology is developed behind closed doors – how can we know if any of it really works?

To answer this question, the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) and the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have been running the biggest face-recognition competition to date.

The Face Recognition Prize Challenge tested two tasks: face verification and face search.

Face verification is what phone manufacturers such as Apple – whose iPhone X, out last week, can be unlocked with your face – are trying to master.

Troy Schindler 2016-12-07
img

You were so young and vibrant and full of life.

You had that thing you were going to do but then never did.

You probably dreamed of what the world might look like in 10 years' time — filled with technological wonders and exciting opportunities.

Well, it s 10 years later.

Brian Williams ran a segment on NBC back in 2007 about the futuristic year 2017.

And I have to say that it s pretty depressing.

Laurence Lafarge 2017-09-15
img

Computer applications and software are used to verify the user by analyzing a still picture or moving video frames of the user.

Like all systems, facial recognition systems work on algorithms.

This algorithm is developed taking your facial features such as the size of the forehead, grooves on the face, shape of the nose, height of the cheekbones and more into account.

The geometric algorithms aim to verify a face by distinguishing particular facial features, for example, circular eyes or an elongated nose.

The photometric algorithms use a statistical approach which distills an image into values.

These values are then compared with the probe photos or templates which were initially uploaded by the user.

William Figueroa 2017-09-11
img

There is no question that facial-recognition technology is getting better.

But what if a person tries to purposely obscure their identity by sporting a fake beard or giant sunglasses?

Up until now, that has been a lot harder for even smart facial-recognition systems to deal with.

This is where new technology developed by researchers from India and the U.K. hopes to address.

Engineers at India’s National Institute of Technology and Institute of Science and the U.K.’s University of Cambridge have developed a facial recognition framework that can identify even people who actively obscure their faces.

“This system can be used to identify a person even if they are disguised,” Amarjot Singh, from the University of Cambridge, told Digital Trends.

Clarence Cohen 2017-09-07

AI and facial recognition are combining for useful things, like unlocking your phone and boarding a airplane.

But of course there’s a sinister side to all those cameras scanning your face – as shown recently in China.

Sign up for an account and get the latest & best stories in your inbox, every day.

Steven's interested in ecommerce, mobile, smartphone adoption, gadgets, social media, transportation, and cars.

If you have any tips or feedback, contact him on Twitter: @sirsteven

Jeffrey Zambrana 2017-12-19
img

Facebook has used facial recognition technology since 2010 to help you tag yourself and friends in photos, but not everyone’s cool with the company’s eerily accurate algorithm (which is only getting better).

According to an announcement today, Facebook will soon make it much simpler to stop it from spotting your face altogether.

Previously, you could disable auto-tagging suggestions by going into the ‘Timeline and Tagging’ section of Settings, but it’s phrased rather unclearly: “Who sees tag suggestions when photos that look like you are uploaded?”

Most people probably wouldn’t be able to immediately tell that was the setting they were looking for.

The new setting simply reads “Do you want Facebook to be able to recognize you in photos and videos,” with a yes/no toggle.

If you don’t mind Facebook’s face recognition, the company will now alert you when a photo of you is uploaded onto its platform, as well as use this technology to help visually impaired users identify their friends without the need for tagging.

Thomas Musick 2017-09-06

Facial recognition technology is under development that’s capable of identifying someone even if their face is covered up — and it could mean that staying anonymous in public will be harder than ever before.

The topic was raised this week after research published on the preprint server arXiv describing just such a system was shared in a popular AI newsletter.

Academic and sociologist Zeynep Tufekci shared the work on Twitter, noting that such technology could become a tool of oppression, with authoritarian states using it to identify anonymous protestors and stifle dissent.

The paper itself needs to be taken with a pinch of salt, though.

Its results were far less accurate than industry-level standards (when someone was wearing a cap, sunglasses, and a scarf, for example, the system could only identify them 55 percent of the time); it used a small dataset; and experts in the field have criticized its methodology.

“It doesn’t strike me as a particularly good paper,” Patrik Huber, a researcher at the University of Surrey who specializes in face tracking and analysis, told The Verge.