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Michael Lofton 2017-02-22
img

If we ve said it once, we ve said it 1,000 times: these so-called "anonymous" messaging apps simply aren t anonymous.

To put it another way, .

Presumably, the CW then informed federal and/or local police, who contacted Whisper.

The company, as per its stated , says that it will comply with law enforcement requests for user data.

That same policy says that the company does not retain any real name, address, or other kinds of personal information about its users but "may retain for a limited time certain IP addresses associated with a device that accessed Whisper."

The company did not respond to Ars request for comment.

collect
0
Robert Tuohy 2016-08-03
img

LAS VEGAS– For the first time, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has commented on the murder of Harambe the Ape, who was killed earlier this year.

In a brief interview at the Blackhat cybersecurity conference, an FBI employee played coy to any involvement the Bureau may have had with the murder of Harambe, which some allege was an inside job.

Read our exclusive interview with some dude guy in the FBI booth:

Gizmodo: Do you think the FBI had any role on the killing of Harambe the Ape?

Gizmodo: Harambe the Ape, from the Cincinnati zoo.

FBI: I have no clue, man.

collect
0
Brad Patterson 2016-06-09

View photosMoreA man types on a computer keyboard in Warsaw in this February 28, 2013 illustration file picture.

REUTERS/Kacper Pempel/Files

NEW YORK Reuters - The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation is working quickly to figure out who perpetrated the cyber heist of $81 million from Bangladesh Bank's account at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in February, but there are no definitive answers yet, a top FBI official said on Thursday.

"We don't have a definitive answer to that question in terms of exactly who.

There are a number of different tentacles to that, that we are looking at.

And we're working as fast as we can to get a resolution," said Richard Jacobs, assistant special agent in charge of the cyber branch at the FBI's New York office.

collect
0
Michael Rase 2017-07-18
img

With security breaches seemingly popping up in the news every other week, by now most of us should (hopefully) know the basics of keeping our data safe online.

Today, however, the FBI is trying to draw attention to a potential security risk that is often overlooked: internet connected toys.

To hear the FBI lay out its case, it sounds like the organization has a lot of concerns about the data these internet connected toys can collect.

The FBI seems to be especially concerned about internet connected toys with microphones and cameras.

When paired with speech recognition software and even GPS in some cases, these toys have the potential to collect a lot of data, and that’s especially true when you consider how open children can be about their own lives.

What’s concerning about all of this is the potential for data breaches.

collect
0
Scott Mayle 2017-10-24
img

In the last 11 months, FBI agents have tried, unsuccessfully, to break into 6,900 mobile devices, reported the Associated Press.

That's more than half of the devices the agency targeted, according to FBI director Christopher Wray.

It's not the first we've heard of the FBI's failures at retrieving data from phones in criminal investigations.

Last year, Apple refused the agency access to an iPhone belonging to a shooter in a terror attack in San Bernardino, deciding not to create a back door for the agency to use.

The FBI only found success after later engaging the help of an unidentified third party.

Seeing data encryption frustrate law enforcers, cybersecurity experts noted the issues are now a "fact of life" and that it's impossible to enable back door access for governments without compromising security.

collect
0
Alex Blair 2016-06-23
img

First the good news.

The United States senate rejected a proposal today that would have given the FBI increased surveillance powers, including the ability to search our internet browsing history without a warrant.

Now for the bad; it was barely rejected and we could see a modified version of the same proposal in the near future.

The measure, introduced earlier this week by Senator John McCain R-Arizona , was intended to — as McCain said — track lone wolves in the wake of the mass shooting at an Orlando nightclub earlier this month.

The proposal fell just two votes short, and one of the two votes belonged to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell R-Kentucky , who switched his vote at the last moment.

Because of the last-minute swithcheroo, McConnell can actually bring the measure — or a modified version of it more likely — up for reconsideration as early as next week.

collect
0
Everett Enriquez 2018-01-04
img

It’s 7am and I’m driving down Hull city centre to pick up Brett Johnson, known in cyberspace by the alias Gollumfun and dubbed the “Original Internet Godfather” by the US Secret Service.

I’ve never met anyone whose name has been on that list, and so our encounter comes with some level of subliminal intimidation.

Turns out, he’s both casual and friendly and I’m keeping an open mind.

Johnson praises the FBI, as we walk along campus, and tears well up when he mentions the name of special agent K.M, who guided him in dropping cybercrime for good.

They “saved my life”, he says, while recalling the hardships of his formative years when he felt pushed into skulduggery at the age of ten: the family fraud ring was led by his mother who also convinced Johnson’s grandmother to join in.

Soon enough, he thought: “Why send them the product altogether?

collect
0
Daniel Murdock 2016-11-12

An FBI spokesperson refrained from either confirming or denying the numbers stated by the agency's general counsel at a meeting

The FBI has reportedly acknowledged that in a majority of cases it investigates, the agency is able to unlock and access user data on computers and phones.

According to the agency's general counsel Jim Baker, the FBI is also able to access data from devices of local and state police.

In 2016, in over 80% of cases investigated, the bureau was able to unlock devices and obtain data.

In the past year, the FBI's forensic analysis team has come across password/passcode protected devices in 2,095 out of 6,814 cases, a mere 13%, Motherboard reported.

In a public meeting on encryption, which took place on 11 November in Washington DC, Baker reportedly disclosed that even within the relatively small percentage of 2,095 devices, the bureau was able to unlock devices in 1,210 cases.

collect
0
Belinda Miller 2016-07-12
img

How do you know when a pilot program is over?

Depending on who you are, the answer may vary.

It looks like when the Federal Bureau of Investigation is involved, at least with its iris scanning project, the pilot is over when they say it s over, according to The Verge.

The U.S. Border Patrol, the Pentagon, and agencies from Texas and Missouri have all contributed and agreed to share information with the FBI, which FBI confirmed it has scans from 430,000 arrestees.

Most of the scans come from jails and detention centers.

San Bernadino is by far the largest source of scans.

collect
0
Cornell Lopez 2016-11-09
img

When you re negotiating, the more information you have on the issue the better.

This simple trick makes the other person feel heard and earns you more info to work with.

On the Science of Success podcast, former FBI hostage negotiator Chris Voss shared the techniques he used in the field, and explained how they can be used in less intense situations.

As Voss explains, the best tactic is called mirroring, where you just repeat three to five keywords in their last sentence in the form of a question.

For example, if someone said, We can t fulfill your request because there have been budget cuts.

You would say something like, You can t because of budget cuts?

collect
0
Richard Lucarelli 2017-10-24

Two House committees announced Tuesday that they would conduct a joint probe into the FBI's handling of the Clinton e-mail investigation.

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) said in a joint statement that they are unsatisfied with how the probe into Clinton's private e-mail server concluded.

"Our justice system is represented by a blind-folded woman holding a set of scales.

No entity or individual is exempt from oversight."

Following Comey's July announcement, he next publicly spoke about the Clinton situation on October 28—a week before the election—saying that the bureau discovered more e-mails relevant to the criminal inquiry that needed to be examined.

Days later, on November 6—just two days before the election—Comey announced that the newly discovered e-mail was unrelated to the Clinton investigation.

collect
0
Randall Vincent 2017-10-02
img

A federal judge ruled Saturday that the FBI does not have to disclose the name of the vendor, and how much it was paid by the government for a hacking tool that unlocked the iPhone of a terrorist behind the San Bernardino, California attacks that left 14 people dead.

The development of the unlocking tool ended what was one of the biggest legal showdowns in the technology space, one in which Apple was fighting a judge's order last year to provide the FBI with software to enable investigators to unlock the iPhone 5C of Syed Rizwan Farook.

Farook was one of two shooters behind the December, 2015 attack at a San Bernardino County facility that left him—and wife Tashfeen Malik—dead.

Apple had argued that the law didn't require it to create software, or a "backdoor," to enable the government to unlock its customers' encrypted devices.

But ahead of a major March, 2016 court hearing in which Apple was to contest the order forcing it to cooperate with the FBI, the government dropped its demand and announced it had obtained a method to unlock the iPhone from an "outside party."

Six months later, The Associated Press, USA Today, and Vice Media sued the FBI in a bid to force the agency to reveal the name of the vendor that cracked the iPhone.

collect
0
Calvin Zohn 2017-12-14
img

Internet of Things users need to become sysadmins, America's Federal Bureau of Investigation says.

Steele's post offered a checklist explaining how consumers can best secure their stuff, including a suggestion to: “Isolate 'IoT' devices on their own protected networks” – which means you'll want a firewall between your broadband modem and the switch that connects the devices.

The checklist might reach beyond the capabilities of the average IoT buyer, who just wants to swipe the phone app to control their lights (because the wall is so far away), but on its own, that's a point worth making.

Also, how many people don't even realise there's an admin interface for their oven?)

Most routers will allow users to whitelist, or specify, which devices are authorised to connect to a local network.

FBI: Isolate “IoT” devices on their own protected networks.

collect
0
Corey Matthew 2016-09-27

The letter, sent Tuesday, notes that Yahoo said the breach occurred in late 2014, yet was only disclosed last week.

That means millions of Americans data may have been compromised for two years, the senators wrote.

We have received the letter and will work to respond in a timely and appropriate manner, a Yahoo spokesman said Tuesday in an email message.

Yahoo said last week that the 2014 breach was carried out by state-sponsored actors, but that the company was unaware of the incident until this year.

On Friday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Yahoo first notified the Federal Bureau of Investigation in fall 2014, after 30 to 40 accounts had been compromised, in a breach the company linked to Russian hackers.

At the time, company executives didn t believe that the breach was widespread and notified only the affected users, according to a person familiar with the matter.

collect
0
Edward Finlay 2017-10-02
img

In early 2016, the security vs. privacy debate entered a new phase after Apple refused to help the FBI unlock the iPhone 5C belonging to Syed Rizwan Farook — one of the San Bernardino shooters.

Eventually, the feds used a third-party to access the device.

Now, a federal court has ruled that the agency doesn’t have to reveal who helped it, or how much it paid for the assistance.

As reported by Politico, three news publications — USA Today, the Associated Press and Vice Media — were all suing the FBI under the Freedom of Information act to try and force it to reveal details about the anonymous company and how much it charged to break Apple’s older security features.

But U.S. District Court Judge Tanya Chutkan ruled that the information is properly classified national security secrets and therefore exempt from disclosure under the FOIA.

She also warned that releasing the company’s name would likely make it a target for attack.

collect
0
Toby Taft 2019-02-14
img

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, phishing email scams have cost billions of dollars in fraud losses over the last five years.

Duo, a cloud-based access protection company that provides a phishing campaign tool for organizations to help identify vulnerable end-users, shared an analysis of 7,483 phishing simulation campaigns conducted from mid-2017 to April 2018.

Of more than 230,000 recipients, 44 percent opened phishing emails and 26 percent clicked links within the emails.

“Phishing” is the practice of pretending to be a friend, coworker, business partner, or other reputable source to gain private information.

Although many of us know the signs of a typical email scam, multiple organizations are experiencing phishing scams that are harder to detect.

In a recent phishing attempt slipping through spam filters, scammers pretend to be your organization’s president.

collect
0
Michael Lofton 2017-02-22
img

If we ve said it once, we ve said it 1,000 times: these so-called "anonymous" messaging apps simply aren t anonymous.

To put it another way, .

Presumably, the CW then informed federal and/or local police, who contacted Whisper.

The company, as per its stated , says that it will comply with law enforcement requests for user data.

That same policy says that the company does not retain any real name, address, or other kinds of personal information about its users but "may retain for a limited time certain IP addresses associated with a device that accessed Whisper."

The company did not respond to Ars request for comment.

Brad Patterson 2016-06-09

View photosMoreA man types on a computer keyboard in Warsaw in this February 28, 2013 illustration file picture.

REUTERS/Kacper Pempel/Files

NEW YORK Reuters - The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation is working quickly to figure out who perpetrated the cyber heist of $81 million from Bangladesh Bank's account at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in February, but there are no definitive answers yet, a top FBI official said on Thursday.

"We don't have a definitive answer to that question in terms of exactly who.

There are a number of different tentacles to that, that we are looking at.

And we're working as fast as we can to get a resolution," said Richard Jacobs, assistant special agent in charge of the cyber branch at the FBI's New York office.

Scott Mayle 2017-10-24
img

In the last 11 months, FBI agents have tried, unsuccessfully, to break into 6,900 mobile devices, reported the Associated Press.

That's more than half of the devices the agency targeted, according to FBI director Christopher Wray.

It's not the first we've heard of the FBI's failures at retrieving data from phones in criminal investigations.

Last year, Apple refused the agency access to an iPhone belonging to a shooter in a terror attack in San Bernardino, deciding not to create a back door for the agency to use.

The FBI only found success after later engaging the help of an unidentified third party.

Seeing data encryption frustrate law enforcers, cybersecurity experts noted the issues are now a "fact of life" and that it's impossible to enable back door access for governments without compromising security.

Everett Enriquez 2018-01-04
img

It’s 7am and I’m driving down Hull city centre to pick up Brett Johnson, known in cyberspace by the alias Gollumfun and dubbed the “Original Internet Godfather” by the US Secret Service.

I’ve never met anyone whose name has been on that list, and so our encounter comes with some level of subliminal intimidation.

Turns out, he’s both casual and friendly and I’m keeping an open mind.

Johnson praises the FBI, as we walk along campus, and tears well up when he mentions the name of special agent K.M, who guided him in dropping cybercrime for good.

They “saved my life”, he says, while recalling the hardships of his formative years when he felt pushed into skulduggery at the age of ten: the family fraud ring was led by his mother who also convinced Johnson’s grandmother to join in.

Soon enough, he thought: “Why send them the product altogether?

Belinda Miller 2016-07-12
img

How do you know when a pilot program is over?

Depending on who you are, the answer may vary.

It looks like when the Federal Bureau of Investigation is involved, at least with its iris scanning project, the pilot is over when they say it s over, according to The Verge.

The U.S. Border Patrol, the Pentagon, and agencies from Texas and Missouri have all contributed and agreed to share information with the FBI, which FBI confirmed it has scans from 430,000 arrestees.

Most of the scans come from jails and detention centers.

San Bernadino is by far the largest source of scans.

Richard Lucarelli 2017-10-24

Two House committees announced Tuesday that they would conduct a joint probe into the FBI's handling of the Clinton e-mail investigation.

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) said in a joint statement that they are unsatisfied with how the probe into Clinton's private e-mail server concluded.

"Our justice system is represented by a blind-folded woman holding a set of scales.

No entity or individual is exempt from oversight."

Following Comey's July announcement, he next publicly spoke about the Clinton situation on October 28—a week before the election—saying that the bureau discovered more e-mails relevant to the criminal inquiry that needed to be examined.

Days later, on November 6—just two days before the election—Comey announced that the newly discovered e-mail was unrelated to the Clinton investigation.

Calvin Zohn 2017-12-14
img

Internet of Things users need to become sysadmins, America's Federal Bureau of Investigation says.

Steele's post offered a checklist explaining how consumers can best secure their stuff, including a suggestion to: “Isolate 'IoT' devices on their own protected networks” – which means you'll want a firewall between your broadband modem and the switch that connects the devices.

The checklist might reach beyond the capabilities of the average IoT buyer, who just wants to swipe the phone app to control their lights (because the wall is so far away), but on its own, that's a point worth making.

Also, how many people don't even realise there's an admin interface for their oven?)

Most routers will allow users to whitelist, or specify, which devices are authorised to connect to a local network.

FBI: Isolate “IoT” devices on their own protected networks.

Edward Finlay 2017-10-02
img

In early 2016, the security vs. privacy debate entered a new phase after Apple refused to help the FBI unlock the iPhone 5C belonging to Syed Rizwan Farook — one of the San Bernardino shooters.

Eventually, the feds used a third-party to access the device.

Now, a federal court has ruled that the agency doesn’t have to reveal who helped it, or how much it paid for the assistance.

As reported by Politico, three news publications — USA Today, the Associated Press and Vice Media — were all suing the FBI under the Freedom of Information act to try and force it to reveal details about the anonymous company and how much it charged to break Apple’s older security features.

But U.S. District Court Judge Tanya Chutkan ruled that the information is properly classified national security secrets and therefore exempt from disclosure under the FOIA.

She also warned that releasing the company’s name would likely make it a target for attack.

Robert Tuohy 2016-08-03
img

LAS VEGAS– For the first time, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has commented on the murder of Harambe the Ape, who was killed earlier this year.

In a brief interview at the Blackhat cybersecurity conference, an FBI employee played coy to any involvement the Bureau may have had with the murder of Harambe, which some allege was an inside job.

Read our exclusive interview with some dude guy in the FBI booth:

Gizmodo: Do you think the FBI had any role on the killing of Harambe the Ape?

Gizmodo: Harambe the Ape, from the Cincinnati zoo.

FBI: I have no clue, man.

Michael Rase 2017-07-18
img

With security breaches seemingly popping up in the news every other week, by now most of us should (hopefully) know the basics of keeping our data safe online.

Today, however, the FBI is trying to draw attention to a potential security risk that is often overlooked: internet connected toys.

To hear the FBI lay out its case, it sounds like the organization has a lot of concerns about the data these internet connected toys can collect.

The FBI seems to be especially concerned about internet connected toys with microphones and cameras.

When paired with speech recognition software and even GPS in some cases, these toys have the potential to collect a lot of data, and that’s especially true when you consider how open children can be about their own lives.

What’s concerning about all of this is the potential for data breaches.

Alex Blair 2016-06-23
img

First the good news.

The United States senate rejected a proposal today that would have given the FBI increased surveillance powers, including the ability to search our internet browsing history without a warrant.

Now for the bad; it was barely rejected and we could see a modified version of the same proposal in the near future.

The measure, introduced earlier this week by Senator John McCain R-Arizona , was intended to — as McCain said — track lone wolves in the wake of the mass shooting at an Orlando nightclub earlier this month.

The proposal fell just two votes short, and one of the two votes belonged to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell R-Kentucky , who switched his vote at the last moment.

Because of the last-minute swithcheroo, McConnell can actually bring the measure — or a modified version of it more likely — up for reconsideration as early as next week.

Daniel Murdock 2016-11-12

An FBI spokesperson refrained from either confirming or denying the numbers stated by the agency's general counsel at a meeting

The FBI has reportedly acknowledged that in a majority of cases it investigates, the agency is able to unlock and access user data on computers and phones.

According to the agency's general counsel Jim Baker, the FBI is also able to access data from devices of local and state police.

In 2016, in over 80% of cases investigated, the bureau was able to unlock devices and obtain data.

In the past year, the FBI's forensic analysis team has come across password/passcode protected devices in 2,095 out of 6,814 cases, a mere 13%, Motherboard reported.

In a public meeting on encryption, which took place on 11 November in Washington DC, Baker reportedly disclosed that even within the relatively small percentage of 2,095 devices, the bureau was able to unlock devices in 1,210 cases.

Cornell Lopez 2016-11-09
img

When you re negotiating, the more information you have on the issue the better.

This simple trick makes the other person feel heard and earns you more info to work with.

On the Science of Success podcast, former FBI hostage negotiator Chris Voss shared the techniques he used in the field, and explained how they can be used in less intense situations.

As Voss explains, the best tactic is called mirroring, where you just repeat three to five keywords in their last sentence in the form of a question.

For example, if someone said, We can t fulfill your request because there have been budget cuts.

You would say something like, You can t because of budget cuts?

Randall Vincent 2017-10-02
img

A federal judge ruled Saturday that the FBI does not have to disclose the name of the vendor, and how much it was paid by the government for a hacking tool that unlocked the iPhone of a terrorist behind the San Bernardino, California attacks that left 14 people dead.

The development of the unlocking tool ended what was one of the biggest legal showdowns in the technology space, one in which Apple was fighting a judge's order last year to provide the FBI with software to enable investigators to unlock the iPhone 5C of Syed Rizwan Farook.

Farook was one of two shooters behind the December, 2015 attack at a San Bernardino County facility that left him—and wife Tashfeen Malik—dead.

Apple had argued that the law didn't require it to create software, or a "backdoor," to enable the government to unlock its customers' encrypted devices.

But ahead of a major March, 2016 court hearing in which Apple was to contest the order forcing it to cooperate with the FBI, the government dropped its demand and announced it had obtained a method to unlock the iPhone from an "outside party."

Six months later, The Associated Press, USA Today, and Vice Media sued the FBI in a bid to force the agency to reveal the name of the vendor that cracked the iPhone.

Corey Matthew 2016-09-27

The letter, sent Tuesday, notes that Yahoo said the breach occurred in late 2014, yet was only disclosed last week.

That means millions of Americans data may have been compromised for two years, the senators wrote.

We have received the letter and will work to respond in a timely and appropriate manner, a Yahoo spokesman said Tuesday in an email message.

Yahoo said last week that the 2014 breach was carried out by state-sponsored actors, but that the company was unaware of the incident until this year.

On Friday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Yahoo first notified the Federal Bureau of Investigation in fall 2014, after 30 to 40 accounts had been compromised, in a breach the company linked to Russian hackers.

At the time, company executives didn t believe that the breach was widespread and notified only the affected users, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Toby Taft 2019-02-14
img

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, phishing email scams have cost billions of dollars in fraud losses over the last five years.

Duo, a cloud-based access protection company that provides a phishing campaign tool for organizations to help identify vulnerable end-users, shared an analysis of 7,483 phishing simulation campaigns conducted from mid-2017 to April 2018.

Of more than 230,000 recipients, 44 percent opened phishing emails and 26 percent clicked links within the emails.

“Phishing” is the practice of pretending to be a friend, coworker, business partner, or other reputable source to gain private information.

Although many of us know the signs of a typical email scam, multiple organizations are experiencing phishing scams that are harder to detect.

In a recent phishing attempt slipping through spam filters, scammers pretend to be your organization’s president.