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Jennifer Ervin 2017-01-17

WASHINGTON—The Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday sued Qualcomm Inc., alleging the semiconductor company engaged in unlawful tactics to maintain a monopoly on a type of chip used in cellphones.

The FTC, in a suit filed in a California federal court, alleged that Qualcomm used its position as the dominant provider of baseband processors, devices that enable cellular communications, to impose onerous terms on phone manufacturers and...

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0
Wayne Strickland 2018-03-27
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For a long time it seemed like Facebook and its corral of code-cowboys were untouchable.

That illusion has evaporated in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, and now, Facebook is officially the target of a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) investigation in the US.

It’s about damn time, am I right?

The FTC investigation is specifically looking into Facebook’s data handling practices.

This is a sensible target, since it was revealed last week that profile information of over 50 million Americans was siphoned off using Facebook-sanctioned tools and then leveraged in elections by Cambridge Analytica, a political consultancy reportedly launched in part by Steve Bannon and contracted by the Trump presidential campaign.

The FTC would not comment on the upcoming investigation last week but just confirmed it publicly.

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0
Clarence Cohen 2021-07-21
Senate Commerce, Science And Transportation Committee Holds Confirmation Hearing

The Federal Trade Commission formally pledged to take on unlawful “right to repair” restrictions in a new policy statement issued Wednesday. The new policy could spell trouble for smartphone manufacturers like Apple that strictly inhibit users’ abilities to repair their own devices.

Wednesday’s new right to repair policy statement commits the FTC to encouraging competition in product repair markets with “vigor,” according to Chair Lina Khan. The statement, which was approved unanimously, makes it official FTC policy for the agency to use its existing authorities to support independent repair shops and lower repair costs for consumers.

“While efforts by dominant firms to restrict repair markets are not new, changes in technology and more...

Continue reading…

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William Ly 2021-07-02
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From cell phone radiation and RFID blockers to UVC sanitizers, we investigated whether popular products are truly keeping you safe—or just scaremongering.
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Albert Hummel 2020-11-09
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The United States Federal Trade Commission announced an agreement with Zoom to fix security issues

The post FTC Agreement Requires Zoom to Improve Security via @martinibuster appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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0
Alfred Borrow 2021-07-28
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Don't stress about buying a new car. Follow these tips and pieces of advice to make sure you can afford a new set of wheels.
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2
Steven Condon 2016-08-05
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Sponsored posts from celebrities—or worse yet, influencers —are terrible in any form, but they re especially bad when it s not clear they re actually ads.

That s why, according to a report from Bloomberg, the Federal Trade Commission wants to crack down on these fuzzily-labeled posts.

We ve been interested in deceptive endorsements for decades and this is a new way in which they are appearing, Michael Ostheimer, who works in the FTC s Ad Practices Division, told Bloomberg.

We believe consumers put stock in endorsements and we want to make sure they are not being deceived.

Ostheimer didn t lay out many specifics for the FTC s plan of attack, but indicated the agency would likely go after the companies behind the products, not the celebrities or influencers themselves, though it hasn t ruled that possibility out.

Some famous people label their sponsored posts—for which they often get paid huge sums of money—with hashtags like ad, sp, or spon, but the FTC says this isn t always enough.

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0
Scott Morell 2016-08-08
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Consumers have the right to know when they re being sold to, says the Federal Trade Commission.

Celebrities who wear, share, brag on, or just talk about products are getting a heads up from the federal government — if they re paid to hawk goods, the compensation needs to be crystal clear, according to Bloomberg.

We ve been interested in deceptive endorsements for decades, and this is a new way in which they are appearing, said Michael Ostheimer, an FTC Ad Practices Division deputy.

Television marketing is losing its pulling power, according to Bloomberg, especially for 20-somethings.

Social media is the go-to medium in many cases.

Captiv8, a firm that hooks up brands with influencers, says brands are paying influencers more than $255 million monthly on Instagram alone.

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0
Isiah Jone 2017-04-20
img

The Federal Trade Commission has put dozens of so-called influencers on notice for failing to adequately document the fact that their Instagram and such like posts are in fact thinly veiled ads for which the posters are being generously compensated.

The agency sent out more than 90 letters to “celebrities, athletes, and other influencers” reminding them to “clearly and conspicuously disclose” that posts are sponsored, or that a company otherwise supports them.

And no cute stuff either, the FTC says in the letters.

For example, no putting your sponsor message below the “more” button, where no one will see it.

And no disguising it ambiguously as “thanks Nike,” as if Nike was just cool enough to let you use their corporate getaway beach house because you asked nicely.

No burying the disclosure in obscure terminology, like sp or partner, deep in the sea of hashtags.

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0
Randall Vincent 2021-06-15
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The move could signal a more progressive agenda for the Federal Trade Commission.
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0
Jacqueline Cleghorn 2019-07-24
img

On Wednesday, the Federal Trade Commission slapped Facebook with a $5 billion fine plus a slew of regulations.

It's one of the largest such fines in the FTC's history.

The fine was imposed, "to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that the company violated a 2012 FTC order by deceiving users about their ability to control the privacy of their personal information."

So, where does that $5 billion fine go?

Not to the deceived Facebook users, but to the United States Treasury.

Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

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0
Troy Schindler 2021-05-17
img
The Federal Trade Commission released a new report Monday on cryptocurrency fraud and tips to protect your investments.
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0
Filiberto Lahey 2021-02-02
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The Federal Trade Commission alleges that Amazon only stopped the practice after it became aware of the agency's investigation.
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0
Scott Siebenaler 2021-03-30
img
The US Federal Trade Commission reckons Qualcomm’s licensing practices are anticompetitive, but not much of the legal profession agrees.
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0
John Murphy 2016-11-29
img

If a company makes a mistake and sends an extra item you didn t order, you have an ethical obligation to return it, but legally, you don t have to send it back.

It s yours to keep.

As Consumerist points out, The Federal Trade Commission FTC explains the rules fairly clearly.

According to the FTC website:

What do you do when you receive merchandise that you didn t order?

According to the Federal Trade Commission, you don t have to pay for it.

collect
0
Mildred Billups 2021-02-05
img
The US Federal Trade Commission says criminals can use personal information to steal your identity. Instead, take a "vaccine selfie."
collect
0
Jennifer Ervin 2017-01-17

WASHINGTON—The Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday sued Qualcomm Inc., alleging the semiconductor company engaged in unlawful tactics to maintain a monopoly on a type of chip used in cellphones.

The FTC, in a suit filed in a California federal court, alleged that Qualcomm used its position as the dominant provider of baseband processors, devices that enable cellular communications, to impose onerous terms on phone manufacturers and...

Clarence Cohen 2021-07-21
Senate Commerce, Science And Transportation Committee Holds Confirmation Hearing

The Federal Trade Commission formally pledged to take on unlawful “right to repair” restrictions in a new policy statement issued Wednesday. The new policy could spell trouble for smartphone manufacturers like Apple that strictly inhibit users’ abilities to repair their own devices.

Wednesday’s new right to repair policy statement commits the FTC to encouraging competition in product repair markets with “vigor,” according to Chair Lina Khan. The statement, which was approved unanimously, makes it official FTC policy for the agency to use its existing authorities to support independent repair shops and lower repair costs for consumers.

“While efforts by dominant firms to restrict repair markets are not new, changes in technology and more...

Continue reading…

Albert Hummel 2020-11-09
img

The United States Federal Trade Commission announced an agreement with Zoom to fix security issues

The post FTC Agreement Requires Zoom to Improve Security via @martinibuster appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

Steven Condon 2016-08-05
img

Sponsored posts from celebrities—or worse yet, influencers —are terrible in any form, but they re especially bad when it s not clear they re actually ads.

That s why, according to a report from Bloomberg, the Federal Trade Commission wants to crack down on these fuzzily-labeled posts.

We ve been interested in deceptive endorsements for decades and this is a new way in which they are appearing, Michael Ostheimer, who works in the FTC s Ad Practices Division, told Bloomberg.

We believe consumers put stock in endorsements and we want to make sure they are not being deceived.

Ostheimer didn t lay out many specifics for the FTC s plan of attack, but indicated the agency would likely go after the companies behind the products, not the celebrities or influencers themselves, though it hasn t ruled that possibility out.

Some famous people label their sponsored posts—for which they often get paid huge sums of money—with hashtags like ad, sp, or spon, but the FTC says this isn t always enough.

Isiah Jone 2017-04-20
img

The Federal Trade Commission has put dozens of so-called influencers on notice for failing to adequately document the fact that their Instagram and such like posts are in fact thinly veiled ads for which the posters are being generously compensated.

The agency sent out more than 90 letters to “celebrities, athletes, and other influencers” reminding them to “clearly and conspicuously disclose” that posts are sponsored, or that a company otherwise supports them.

And no cute stuff either, the FTC says in the letters.

For example, no putting your sponsor message below the “more” button, where no one will see it.

And no disguising it ambiguously as “thanks Nike,” as if Nike was just cool enough to let you use their corporate getaway beach house because you asked nicely.

No burying the disclosure in obscure terminology, like sp or partner, deep in the sea of hashtags.

Jacqueline Cleghorn 2019-07-24
img

On Wednesday, the Federal Trade Commission slapped Facebook with a $5 billion fine plus a slew of regulations.

It's one of the largest such fines in the FTC's history.

The fine was imposed, "to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that the company violated a 2012 FTC order by deceiving users about their ability to control the privacy of their personal information."

So, where does that $5 billion fine go?

Not to the deceived Facebook users, but to the United States Treasury.

Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Filiberto Lahey 2021-02-02
img
The Federal Trade Commission alleges that Amazon only stopped the practice after it became aware of the agency's investigation.
John Murphy 2016-11-29
img

If a company makes a mistake and sends an extra item you didn t order, you have an ethical obligation to return it, but legally, you don t have to send it back.

It s yours to keep.

As Consumerist points out, The Federal Trade Commission FTC explains the rules fairly clearly.

According to the FTC website:

What do you do when you receive merchandise that you didn t order?

According to the Federal Trade Commission, you don t have to pay for it.

Wayne Strickland 2018-03-27
img

For a long time it seemed like Facebook and its corral of code-cowboys were untouchable.

That illusion has evaporated in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, and now, Facebook is officially the target of a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) investigation in the US.

It’s about damn time, am I right?

The FTC investigation is specifically looking into Facebook’s data handling practices.

This is a sensible target, since it was revealed last week that profile information of over 50 million Americans was siphoned off using Facebook-sanctioned tools and then leveraged in elections by Cambridge Analytica, a political consultancy reportedly launched in part by Steve Bannon and contracted by the Trump presidential campaign.

The FTC would not comment on the upcoming investigation last week but just confirmed it publicly.

William Ly 2021-07-02
img
From cell phone radiation and RFID blockers to UVC sanitizers, we investigated whether popular products are truly keeping you safe—or just scaremongering.
Alfred Borrow 2021-07-28
img
Don't stress about buying a new car. Follow these tips and pieces of advice to make sure you can afford a new set of wheels.
Scott Morell 2016-08-08
img

Consumers have the right to know when they re being sold to, says the Federal Trade Commission.

Celebrities who wear, share, brag on, or just talk about products are getting a heads up from the federal government — if they re paid to hawk goods, the compensation needs to be crystal clear, according to Bloomberg.

We ve been interested in deceptive endorsements for decades, and this is a new way in which they are appearing, said Michael Ostheimer, an FTC Ad Practices Division deputy.

Television marketing is losing its pulling power, according to Bloomberg, especially for 20-somethings.

Social media is the go-to medium in many cases.

Captiv8, a firm that hooks up brands with influencers, says brands are paying influencers more than $255 million monthly on Instagram alone.

Randall Vincent 2021-06-15
img
The move could signal a more progressive agenda for the Federal Trade Commission.
Troy Schindler 2021-05-17
img
The Federal Trade Commission released a new report Monday on cryptocurrency fraud and tips to protect your investments.
Scott Siebenaler 2021-03-30
img
The US Federal Trade Commission reckons Qualcomm’s licensing practices are anticompetitive, but not much of the legal profession agrees.
Mildred Billups 2021-02-05
img
The US Federal Trade Commission says criminals can use personal information to steal your identity. Instead, take a "vaccine selfie."