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Robert Carter 2016-06-21
img

A new cybersecurity report from MPs has made a number of stringent recommendations, including a series of escalating fines for companies who spill customer details as a result of data breaches.

The report from the Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee was initiated due to the major TalkTalk breach last year, although the authors were careful to note that it is intended to address broader cybercrime problems and not just single the service provider out.

Recommendations from MPs include penalising bosses at firms who suffer data breaches, as well as noting that the penalty which can be levied on a company will soon be raised from the present £500,000 maximum fine to €20 million around £15.5 million, or a maximum 4% of global turnover with the EU's incoming General Data Protection Regulation.

The report noted: "The ICO should introduce a series of escalating fines, based on the lack of attention to threats and vulnerabilities which have led to previous breaches.

Crackdown on cybercriminals

Furthermore, it's not just businesses who are being clamped down upon, but also cybercriminals themselves – those who hack companies, or otherwise obtain and sell user data, could be jailed for up to two years, the committee recommended.

The MPs also called for a "step change" in terms of making consumers aware of online and telephone scams which are increasingly trying to snare the unwary.

collect
0
Marc Anderson 2017-06-07

So it was $6 million between 46 states and now it's $112 million between 4 states plus an extra $168 million.

I feel like the first 46 states didn't push hard enough...

collect
0
Julie Romero 2017-06-23
img

The WannaCry ransomware that affected more than 300,000 computers in over 150 countries may be mostly behind us, but there are some locations where infected systems are still being discovered.

Authorities in the southeastern Australian state of Victoria only detected the malware last week, which, while bad news for them, turned out to be good news for many Aussie drivers.

The infection came to light when someone noticed a number of speed and red-light cameras were rebooting themselves more often than usual.

It seems that 55 of the cameras were affected between June 6 and June 22, which has led to police canceling about 590 fines issued from the devices.

“Importantly, only three of those (tickets) resulted in loss of license infringements,” said Acting Deputy Commissioner, Ross Guenther, at a press conference.

"I canceled the fines because I think it's important the public has 100% confidence in the system."

collect
0
James Rankins 2018-05-10
img

The commission on Thursday announced it would indeed seek to collect the massive fine it had first proposed against Adrian Abramovich in 2017.

Abramovich, a Miami-based travel marketer it said was being tens of millions of nuisance calls made over a three-month period.

The fine is the largest penalty the FCC has ever handed down.

According to the FCC, Abramovich placed calls to people around the country pretending to be from various travel and hotel companies.

Those who answered were played recordings offering vacation packages and, if they pressed a button to learn more, were sent to sales reps in overseas call centers.

To make the robocalls seem more authentic, the FCC said Abramovich used spoofed numbers to appear as a local caller.

collect
0
Richard Bond 2017-04-21
img

Election nixes online court plans – for now

The controversial "conviction by computer" Parliamentary Bill has been scrapped ahead of June's general election, according to reports.

The Prisons and Courts Bill has been dropped by the government as it starts winding down legislative activities, reported the Law Society Gazette.

David Lidington, leader of the House of Commons, confirmed on Thursday that the bill would not be included in the so-called "wash up" stage of laws rushed through Parliament before the Commons is dissolved at the end of this month.

Among other provisions, the Bill would have paved the way for the government's conviction-by-computer plans.

These would have allowed instant fines to be given to people who plead guilty to dodging train fares or TV licence fees.

collect
0
Ronnie Allen 2017-03-13
img

The fine is one of the biggest ever handed out by the ICO for nuisance calls

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has slapped Hampshire-Based Media Tactics with a £270,000 fine for making 22 million nuisance calls.

Automated marketing calls – which in this case were related to a variety of subjects including PPI, personal injury claims and debt management – can only be carried out if the recipient has specifically agreed to receive them

An ICO investigation found that Media Tactics did not have the necessary permissions, thus prompting the organisation to hand out one of its biggest ever fines for nuisance calls.

Media Tactics said that it had brought data from other websites such as insurance brokers and prize draw sites, with the belief that the citizens included had consented to being contacted by marketing companies.

However, the ICO ruled that the privacy notices on those sites were “generic and unspecific” and that as a result the consents obtained were not adequate.

collect
0
Raymond Powers 2018-04-03
img

Local councils have been handed the sort of power that angry dads can only dream of — a doubling of many of the fines for littering our proud* land with the detritus of convenience culture.

From now or hereabouts, the maximum fine for littering or doing a bit of graffiti has risen from £80 to £150, with the laws now covering the act of chucking something out of a car window.

So if you're done with your extreme caffeinated energy drink in a rural beauty spot and decide in the heat of a jittery rush that it's best disposed off out the window, you could go down the the tune of an example-making fine of £150, should the police and everyone else involved be bothered with the effort of proving it happened.

It's sort of a money-saving exercise as well as a financial initiative, as the government believes that our local councils spend around £700m a year on picking up litter, so if we can be trained, educated or enforced not to do so that would lessen the burden on our tax revenues.

collect
0
Gary Tokarski 2017-04-02
img

You may love your family members, but do you love them enough to pay their fines for illegal downloads?

Your little rascals are your responsibility, even after they’re not so little, a German court rules, and that applies in every sense of the word.

In this digital age, there are quite a few senses, perhaps the most costly being our kiddos’ penchant for downloading computer games … illegally.

Late last week, the European nation’s top court determined that parents must either spill the beans on their adult children’s wrongdoings when it comes to illegal downloads, or pay the price themselves.

The decision, which places obligation to the law above obligation to family, came after a particular case in which members of the same clan said that being related to one another meant that they wouldn’t have to testify against each other.

Germany has now voiced its disagreement.

collect
0
Robert Pedigo 2016-06-20
img

Nearly 157,000 customers' details were accessed when Talk Talk was hacked

Companies that fail on cyber security should be fined, MPs have recommended following last year's hacking of Talk Talk.

More follows...

collect
0
Jorge Medina 2018-07-15
img

Sources have said that technology superpower Google is set to face the music on Tuesday, as European Union antitrust regulators are rumoured to have made a final decision against its Android operating system.

A meeting deciding the company’s fate had been scheduled by the European Commission for last Tuesday, however it was moved without warning.

A person familiar with the matter told Reuters the meeting is now set for 17 July, without giving a reason for the change.

It is suspected that the meeting was moved to avoid a clash with US President Donald Trump’s trip to Brussels.

The record-breaking fine could reach as high as $11bn (£8.2bn), which is 10 per cent of its parent company Alphabet’s global turnover.

Read more: Google to be hit by EU fines of up to $11bn over Android market dominance

collect
0
William Jones 2018-06-12
img

's UK limb has finally been handed a £250,000 fine for the 2014 cyber attack that exposed data of half a million Brit users.

Russian hackers broke into Yahoo!

's servers and slurped info on circa 500 million international account holders, including names, email addresses, phone numbers, birthdates, hashed passwords and encrypted or unencrypted security questions and answers.

Despite evidence that the firm knew about the mega-hack soon after it happened at the end of 2014, Yahoo!

kept quiet until September 2016.

Since then, the fines and court cases have kept rolling in as various regulators get in on the action.

collect
0
Bessie Scavotto 2019-02-21
img

Beijing court records published online yesterday show that last November, rental bike company Ofo owed two suppliers almost RMB 150 million (around $22 million) after defaulting on payments.

The former investor favorite has been struggling to pay off its debts, and the recently unveiled rulings hint at the magnitude of what it owes.

Both cases—one leveled by Tianjin’s Fulande Bicycle Group and the other by Shanghai-based Phoenix Bicycle—were accepted by courts in June 2018, which ruled on the cases on Nov. 13 of the same year.

The courts’ decisions were publicized online on Wednesday, instructing Ofo to repay its creditors.

Ofo’s parent company, Dongxia Datong Management and Consulting, was ordered to deliver late payments, as well as a fine for breach of contract, to bike parts supplier Fulande within 10 days.

The repayments total more than RMB 70 million, and the fine almost RMB 8 million.

collect
0
Jerry Miller 2017-05-30
img

p The UK government is ramping up the pressure on social media giants to get their houses in order after floating the possibility of issuing fines for moderation lapses – should the Conservatives win a parliamentary majority on 9 June.

Security minister Ben Wallace is backing a hardline approach after describing a leaked copy of Facebook’s moderation guidelines published by the Guardian as ‘totally unacceptable’ for allowing, amongst other things, images to be shown of children under seven being bullied so long as no captions are shown.

Facebook has already vowed to streamline the reporting of suspect content and speed up the process of invigilating posts but this has done little to quell mounting anger directed at Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and others over their apparently lax approach in dealing with criminal content such as abuse, hate speech and terror propaganda.

Prime minister Theresa May has taken a lead role on the issue after securing a joint communique from leaders of the G7 group of nations on Friday to ratchet up the pressure on Silicon Valley to do more to combat online extremism.

The German government has already outlined similar proposals to impose fines of up to 50m euros against social media firms which fail to remove content flagged as hate speech within 24 hours.

collect
0
Brad Patterson 2018-04-16
img

This practice is illegal, per a 2014 rule imposed by the FCC.

As a result of T-Mobile’s negligence, the company must pay a $40 million fine, alter its practices, and report yearly to the FCC to ensure compliance.

You dial the number, hold the phone to your ear, and listen to the ringing sound.

Eventually, either the person or a voicemail service answers the call.

Feel Years Younger By Boosting Your Stem Cells At Home

What if we told you that the ringing sound you heard during calls didn’t always signify that the person you were calling was actually hearing the phone ring?

collect
0
Michael Ambriz 2018-06-28

AT has agreed to pay a $5.25 million fine to settle an investigation into a pair of nationwide 911 outages that occurred in early 2017.

The Federal Communications Commission said the first outage, on March 8th, lasted about five hours and affected 12,600 callers.

The second, on May 1st, lasted 47 minutes and resulted in 2,600 failed 911 calls.

“Such preventable outages are unacceptable,” the FCC wrote in a statement announcing the settlement.

“Robust and reliable 911 service is a national priority, as repeatedly expressed by both Congress and the Commission.”

In addition to the fines, AT is also required to make changes to help minimize issues should an outage happen again and to make sure it informs the proper parties about such outages.

collect
0
Robert Carter 2018-07-19
img

Google has suffered another casualty in the battle between global tech giants and the EU.

The European Commission yesterday fined the company a record €4.34bn for anti-competitive behaviour which competition commissioner Margrethe Vestager deemed “illegal”.

The accusation is essentially that Google used the dominance of its Android operating system to promote its other products, such as Search or the Google web browser.

Manufacturers were paid and pressured to pre-install Google software onto Android handsets, which, according to the EU, limited consumer choice and gave Google an unfair advantage over other developers.

Read more: Google hit with record-breaking fine amid Android controversy

Android users are, of course, free to download and use other browsers and search engines.

collect
0
Robert Carter 2016-06-21
img

A new cybersecurity report from MPs has made a number of stringent recommendations, including a series of escalating fines for companies who spill customer details as a result of data breaches.

The report from the Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee was initiated due to the major TalkTalk breach last year, although the authors were careful to note that it is intended to address broader cybercrime problems and not just single the service provider out.

Recommendations from MPs include penalising bosses at firms who suffer data breaches, as well as noting that the penalty which can be levied on a company will soon be raised from the present £500,000 maximum fine to €20 million around £15.5 million, or a maximum 4% of global turnover with the EU's incoming General Data Protection Regulation.

The report noted: "The ICO should introduce a series of escalating fines, based on the lack of attention to threats and vulnerabilities which have led to previous breaches.

Crackdown on cybercriminals

Furthermore, it's not just businesses who are being clamped down upon, but also cybercriminals themselves – those who hack companies, or otherwise obtain and sell user data, could be jailed for up to two years, the committee recommended.

The MPs also called for a "step change" in terms of making consumers aware of online and telephone scams which are increasingly trying to snare the unwary.

Julie Romero 2017-06-23
img

The WannaCry ransomware that affected more than 300,000 computers in over 150 countries may be mostly behind us, but there are some locations where infected systems are still being discovered.

Authorities in the southeastern Australian state of Victoria only detected the malware last week, which, while bad news for them, turned out to be good news for many Aussie drivers.

The infection came to light when someone noticed a number of speed and red-light cameras were rebooting themselves more often than usual.

It seems that 55 of the cameras were affected between June 6 and June 22, which has led to police canceling about 590 fines issued from the devices.

“Importantly, only three of those (tickets) resulted in loss of license infringements,” said Acting Deputy Commissioner, Ross Guenther, at a press conference.

"I canceled the fines because I think it's important the public has 100% confidence in the system."

Richard Bond 2017-04-21
img

Election nixes online court plans – for now

The controversial "conviction by computer" Parliamentary Bill has been scrapped ahead of June's general election, according to reports.

The Prisons and Courts Bill has been dropped by the government as it starts winding down legislative activities, reported the Law Society Gazette.

David Lidington, leader of the House of Commons, confirmed on Thursday that the bill would not be included in the so-called "wash up" stage of laws rushed through Parliament before the Commons is dissolved at the end of this month.

Among other provisions, the Bill would have paved the way for the government's conviction-by-computer plans.

These would have allowed instant fines to be given to people who plead guilty to dodging train fares or TV licence fees.

Raymond Powers 2018-04-03
img

Local councils have been handed the sort of power that angry dads can only dream of — a doubling of many of the fines for littering our proud* land with the detritus of convenience culture.

From now or hereabouts, the maximum fine for littering or doing a bit of graffiti has risen from £80 to £150, with the laws now covering the act of chucking something out of a car window.

So if you're done with your extreme caffeinated energy drink in a rural beauty spot and decide in the heat of a jittery rush that it's best disposed off out the window, you could go down the the tune of an example-making fine of £150, should the police and everyone else involved be bothered with the effort of proving it happened.

It's sort of a money-saving exercise as well as a financial initiative, as the government believes that our local councils spend around £700m a year on picking up litter, so if we can be trained, educated or enforced not to do so that would lessen the burden on our tax revenues.

Robert Pedigo 2016-06-20
img

Nearly 157,000 customers' details were accessed when Talk Talk was hacked

Companies that fail on cyber security should be fined, MPs have recommended following last year's hacking of Talk Talk.

More follows...

William Jones 2018-06-12
img

's UK limb has finally been handed a £250,000 fine for the 2014 cyber attack that exposed data of half a million Brit users.

Russian hackers broke into Yahoo!

's servers and slurped info on circa 500 million international account holders, including names, email addresses, phone numbers, birthdates, hashed passwords and encrypted or unencrypted security questions and answers.

Despite evidence that the firm knew about the mega-hack soon after it happened at the end of 2014, Yahoo!

kept quiet until September 2016.

Since then, the fines and court cases have kept rolling in as various regulators get in on the action.

Jerry Miller 2017-05-30
img

p The UK government is ramping up the pressure on social media giants to get their houses in order after floating the possibility of issuing fines for moderation lapses – should the Conservatives win a parliamentary majority on 9 June.

Security minister Ben Wallace is backing a hardline approach after describing a leaked copy of Facebook’s moderation guidelines published by the Guardian as ‘totally unacceptable’ for allowing, amongst other things, images to be shown of children under seven being bullied so long as no captions are shown.

Facebook has already vowed to streamline the reporting of suspect content and speed up the process of invigilating posts but this has done little to quell mounting anger directed at Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and others over their apparently lax approach in dealing with criminal content such as abuse, hate speech and terror propaganda.

Prime minister Theresa May has taken a lead role on the issue after securing a joint communique from leaders of the G7 group of nations on Friday to ratchet up the pressure on Silicon Valley to do more to combat online extremism.

The German government has already outlined similar proposals to impose fines of up to 50m euros against social media firms which fail to remove content flagged as hate speech within 24 hours.

Michael Ambriz 2018-06-28

AT has agreed to pay a $5.25 million fine to settle an investigation into a pair of nationwide 911 outages that occurred in early 2017.

The Federal Communications Commission said the first outage, on March 8th, lasted about five hours and affected 12,600 callers.

The second, on May 1st, lasted 47 minutes and resulted in 2,600 failed 911 calls.

“Such preventable outages are unacceptable,” the FCC wrote in a statement announcing the settlement.

“Robust and reliable 911 service is a national priority, as repeatedly expressed by both Congress and the Commission.”

In addition to the fines, AT is also required to make changes to help minimize issues should an outage happen again and to make sure it informs the proper parties about such outages.

Marc Anderson 2017-06-07

So it was $6 million between 46 states and now it's $112 million between 4 states plus an extra $168 million.

I feel like the first 46 states didn't push hard enough...

James Rankins 2018-05-10
img

The commission on Thursday announced it would indeed seek to collect the massive fine it had first proposed against Adrian Abramovich in 2017.

Abramovich, a Miami-based travel marketer it said was being tens of millions of nuisance calls made over a three-month period.

The fine is the largest penalty the FCC has ever handed down.

According to the FCC, Abramovich placed calls to people around the country pretending to be from various travel and hotel companies.

Those who answered were played recordings offering vacation packages and, if they pressed a button to learn more, were sent to sales reps in overseas call centers.

To make the robocalls seem more authentic, the FCC said Abramovich used spoofed numbers to appear as a local caller.

Ronnie Allen 2017-03-13
img

The fine is one of the biggest ever handed out by the ICO for nuisance calls

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has slapped Hampshire-Based Media Tactics with a £270,000 fine for making 22 million nuisance calls.

Automated marketing calls – which in this case were related to a variety of subjects including PPI, personal injury claims and debt management – can only be carried out if the recipient has specifically agreed to receive them

An ICO investigation found that Media Tactics did not have the necessary permissions, thus prompting the organisation to hand out one of its biggest ever fines for nuisance calls.

Media Tactics said that it had brought data from other websites such as insurance brokers and prize draw sites, with the belief that the citizens included had consented to being contacted by marketing companies.

However, the ICO ruled that the privacy notices on those sites were “generic and unspecific” and that as a result the consents obtained were not adequate.

Gary Tokarski 2017-04-02
img

You may love your family members, but do you love them enough to pay their fines for illegal downloads?

Your little rascals are your responsibility, even after they’re not so little, a German court rules, and that applies in every sense of the word.

In this digital age, there are quite a few senses, perhaps the most costly being our kiddos’ penchant for downloading computer games … illegally.

Late last week, the European nation’s top court determined that parents must either spill the beans on their adult children’s wrongdoings when it comes to illegal downloads, or pay the price themselves.

The decision, which places obligation to the law above obligation to family, came after a particular case in which members of the same clan said that being related to one another meant that they wouldn’t have to testify against each other.

Germany has now voiced its disagreement.

Jorge Medina 2018-07-15
img

Sources have said that technology superpower Google is set to face the music on Tuesday, as European Union antitrust regulators are rumoured to have made a final decision against its Android operating system.

A meeting deciding the company’s fate had been scheduled by the European Commission for last Tuesday, however it was moved without warning.

A person familiar with the matter told Reuters the meeting is now set for 17 July, without giving a reason for the change.

It is suspected that the meeting was moved to avoid a clash with US President Donald Trump’s trip to Brussels.

The record-breaking fine could reach as high as $11bn (£8.2bn), which is 10 per cent of its parent company Alphabet’s global turnover.

Read more: Google to be hit by EU fines of up to $11bn over Android market dominance

Bessie Scavotto 2019-02-21
img

Beijing court records published online yesterday show that last November, rental bike company Ofo owed two suppliers almost RMB 150 million (around $22 million) after defaulting on payments.

The former investor favorite has been struggling to pay off its debts, and the recently unveiled rulings hint at the magnitude of what it owes.

Both cases—one leveled by Tianjin’s Fulande Bicycle Group and the other by Shanghai-based Phoenix Bicycle—were accepted by courts in June 2018, which ruled on the cases on Nov. 13 of the same year.

The courts’ decisions were publicized online on Wednesday, instructing Ofo to repay its creditors.

Ofo’s parent company, Dongxia Datong Management and Consulting, was ordered to deliver late payments, as well as a fine for breach of contract, to bike parts supplier Fulande within 10 days.

The repayments total more than RMB 70 million, and the fine almost RMB 8 million.

Brad Patterson 2018-04-16
img

This practice is illegal, per a 2014 rule imposed by the FCC.

As a result of T-Mobile’s negligence, the company must pay a $40 million fine, alter its practices, and report yearly to the FCC to ensure compliance.

You dial the number, hold the phone to your ear, and listen to the ringing sound.

Eventually, either the person or a voicemail service answers the call.

Feel Years Younger By Boosting Your Stem Cells At Home

What if we told you that the ringing sound you heard during calls didn’t always signify that the person you were calling was actually hearing the phone ring?

Robert Carter 2018-07-19
img

Google has suffered another casualty in the battle between global tech giants and the EU.

The European Commission yesterday fined the company a record €4.34bn for anti-competitive behaviour which competition commissioner Margrethe Vestager deemed “illegal”.

The accusation is essentially that Google used the dominance of its Android operating system to promote its other products, such as Search or the Google web browser.

Manufacturers were paid and pressured to pre-install Google software onto Android handsets, which, according to the EU, limited consumer choice and gave Google an unfair advantage over other developers.

Read more: Google hit with record-breaking fine amid Android controversy

Android users are, of course, free to download and use other browsers and search engines.