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Wayne Konwinski 2016-05-23
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Freedom of information requests by the i newspaper show that there have been 49 proximity reports by pilots since April 2014.

Pilots have called for better safety regulation to prevent a collision.

Drone users are advised to consult Civil Aviation Authority regulations and obtain permission from landowners before flying their devices.

But the figures show that in the first four months of 2016, there were 15 reported near-misses, more than half of total of 29 in the previous 12 months.

Steve Landells, flight safety specialist at the British Airline Pilots Association Balpa , said: Unless action is taken, Balpa believes the risk of collision is unacceptably high.

Drones fitted with cameras must not be flown within 50m 164ft of people, vehicles or buildings, or over congested areas or large gatherings such as concerts and sports events.

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0
Alex Blair 2016-07-04
img

Boston Consulting doesn't want the people of New South Wales to know why it thinks a private college under police investigation is doing a better job than publicly-funded TAFEs.

Its report, compiled last year for an unknown price, was trumpeted as a win for vocational training privatisation advocates.

It found that the privately-run Australian Careers Network was more efficient than TAFE.

The problem for Boston: the report was released shortly after the company collapsed in a heap of recrimination and police investigation.

The risible report reckoned TAFE was uncompetitive, since it needed nearly $4 billion worth of buildings to deliver courses generating $2 billion of annual revenue.

The now-collapsed Australian Careers Network, by comparison, ran a revenue-to-property ratio of 10:1 $41 million in revenue, $4 million in property because, as it since emerged, it wasn't actually delivering the courses it was charging the government for.

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0
David Reilly 2016-12-15
img

Concerns raised as Government Digital Services fails to hold on to top talent

In today s world of growing technological complexity, having access to the right mix and level of digital skills is vital for any organisation.

It s somewhat alarming then, that a Freedom of Information FOI request submitted by the BBC has revealed the Government Digital Service GDS lost ten senior personnel at deputy director level or above in the year to April 2016.

Not only that, as of March 2016 the organisation had 21 senior positions unfilled.

It should be deeply worrying to see some of the brightest talent in the civil service leaving public service to go and work in the private sector, said Tim Farron, leader of the Liberal Democrats.

Ministers need to make sure that staff feel empowered and engaged, and at the moment it s clear that many civil servants feel neither.

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0
Antonio Barron 2018-05-01
img

FOI reveals vulnerability of critical infrastructure ahead of NIS

With just eight days to go until the EU’s Network and Information Systems (NIS) Directive becomes legally enforceable, a Freedom of Information (FOI) request to 312 critical infrastructure providers across the UK is ringing industry alarm bells.

The FOI requests, submitted by DDoS attack solutions provider Corero Network Security, found that 70% of these institutions – ranging from police forces to NHS trusts, energy suppliers and water authorities – have had service outages in their IT systems within the last two years; many blamed on cyberattacks.

The implication for these institutions under the new directive would be the enforcement of hefty fines.

Under the NIS directive – which aims to raise levels of the overall security and resilience of network and information systems across the EU – these outages need to be reported and addressed.

Failure to do so could result in financial penalties of up to £17 Million being imposed.

collect
0
James Taylor 2016-11-24
img

European Union EU citizens can now get an idea of what their governments want – and are doing about – cryptography regulation.

The news is bleak: the responses to a survey sent to EU governments indicate widespread support for restricting citizens' access to encrypted communications.

As the freedom of information FOI cover letter from the Council of the EU's transparency unit explains, the survey was sent to members in September, following a discussion about crime.

So far, 25 countries have completed the questionnaire, and 11 provided their responses for publication.

Of those published in the FOI so far, what's particularly revealing to The Register is the disparity between different law enforcement agencies' views on encryption.

It's quite accurate, for example, for the Italian response to note that it's seeing HTTPS all over the place, given the concerted push by 'net luminaries to persuade site operators to employ it and therefore offer better protection to sensitive data.

collect
0
Rodney Edson 2016-08-29
img

Your browser does not support HTML5 videoPlayPausePlayPauseMute0%00:00 / 00:00FullscreenSmallscreen Close Embed Feed In a related video - Pokemon Go: Tips and tricks to become the ultimate trainer IBTimes US

There have been nearly 300 Pokémon Go-related incidents reported to UK police since the game launched in July, a Freedom of Information FOI disclosure has revealed.

The widely popular smartphone application became an instant craze this year by using augmented reality AR to allow players to 'catch' Pokémon in the real world.

Yet the proliferation of the phenomenon has also resulted in a rise in criminal – and even national security – concerns.

Now, using requests for information from police forces across England and Wales, the BBC has uncovered the full extent of these complaints in the UK.

Revealing 290 logged cases in July alone, the FOI request disclosed a slew of reports including robberies, thefts, assaults and driving offences.

collect
0
Kevin Oconnor 2019-05-24
img

A series of Freedom of Information requests logged with our national NHS trusts show that the health providers remain a very, very long way away from being anything like paperless in their communications methods, with just 12 per cent of trusts offering a full digital internal communications dream.

Techradar has listed all the percentages and responses in the sort of meticulous and intricate detail you are never likely to get here, with the key takeaway being that the vast majority of NHS trusts are metaphorically miles away from getting anywhere near the 2020 paperless target and have barely started the massive chest-ache of digitising patient records and enabling digital communications between the many and varied teams, departments and outside organisations that work for our wellbeing.

Of the 53 NHS trusts that responded, 37 per cent said they'd managed to digitise more than half of their patient records.

That's about the most positive part of the data for NHS IT squads, as only a mere 16 of the trusts were able to provide a figure for how many entirely paper-based records they had created during Q4 of 2018 – and that stands at a whopping 1.7m.

Those fax machines aren't going anywhere yet.

collect
0
Sandra Wilson 2017-09-25
img

I quake at the imbecility of it," Tony Blair famously said.

Some 17 years ago the legislation came into force under Blair's government, a decision he bitterly regretted in his memoirs.

The intention of the act was to encourage "transparency and accountability" across public sector bodies.

Yet in the intervening years more government organisations have outsourced their services to the private sector, which is exempt under the FoI laws.

This is something The Register has increasingly encountered in our attempts to shine a light on UK government IT spend – an area strewn with costly mistakes.

Take for example the Cabinet Office's shared services centres, intended to save £400m by shifting all departments back office systems into two places.

collect
0
Kristie Hernandez 2016-06-02
img

Pesky humans to blame as data breaches increase, an FOI request to the ICO reveals

People remain the weak link when it comes to corporate security after new data showed that human error is responsible for the bulk of all reported data breaches.

A Freedom of Information FOI request to the Information Commissioner s Office ICO , submitted by secure collaboration firm Egress, found human error accounts for 62 percent of all data breaches reported in the UK

Human Error

Whistleblower leak keyboard security breach CarpathianPrince Shutterstock

Other causes of data breaches include insecure webpages and hacking, which stands at 9 percent combined; data posted or faxed to the wrong recipient 17 percent ; loss and theft of paperwork 17 percent ; and data emailed to the wrong recipient 9 percent .

And somewhat depressingly, the FOI also revealed that data breaches are on the rise, after 66 percent of business sectors reported that they had experienced a rise in breaches over 3 years.

Well, the data revealed some surprises when it showed for example, that the courts and justice sector reported a 500 percent rise in data breaches.

The fact that so many breaches are caused by methods of working that are known data breach pitfalls – such as faxing and posting sensitive information, or using plaintext email – should be a major concern for all organisations, he added.

These figures are particularly worrying now that the EU s GDPR regulation is set to come into effect on May 25th 2018, meaning the clock is ticking for organisations across all industries to address the risk before hefty fines for data breaches are enforced.

collect
0
Gary Meyer 2016-07-19
img

A new lawsuit alleges the Federal Bureau of Investigation is willfully avoiding granting access to documents requested under the Freedom of Information Act FOIA .

The lawsuit, filed by national security researcher and MIT Ph.D. candidate, Ryan Shapiro alleges the FBI is using an antiquated system that searches in the universal index of its legacy Automated Case Support system rather than two modern search applications the FBI has access to — a move he argues leads to failure by design and an inability to turn over requested documents due to the system s inability to find them.

When it comes to FOIA, the FBI is simply not operating in good faith, Shapiro told PC World.

Since the passage of the Freedom of Information Act, the FBI has viewed efforts to force bureau compliance with FOIA as a security threat.

The FBI, on the other hand, argues that the results are essentially the same no matter which search application it uses and that using the modern tools are unduly burdensome, and seriously wasteful of FBI resources.

It s important to note that the system Shapiro is at odds with was built in 1995 and according to Shapiro akin to using a library card catalog rather than a database containing scanned and searchable copies of every book in the collection.

collect
0
David Bierman 2016-08-08
img

The National Reconnaissance Office headquarters in Fairfax, Virginia in 2010 Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images

If you re one of the country s most important spy agencies, you d probably have a pretty strict list of what documents to keep secret, right?

Well, judging from my latest FOIA request, the National Reconnaissance Office NRO might just be winging it.

Back in April, I filed a Freedom of Information request for a list of history papers held by the NRO, the American intelligence agency tasked with keeping an eye on the globe from satellites in space.

I was expecting to get more information than had already been released to other organizations like Government Attic back in 2012.

And a couple of days ago, I did.

collect
0
Brandon Gaither 2016-09-30
img

Do we block unsanctioned ones?

Well half of us think we do...

Almost half of NHS Trusts make no attempt to monitor cloud app usage, according to the results of a Freedom of Information request.

The same FOI by cloud security firm Netskope also revealed that fewer than one-fifth of NHS Trusts have visibility into all cloud app use, leaving sensitive data vulnerable to both risky apps and malicious behaviour.

The FOI request was issued to 80 of the UK s Acute NHS Trusts, with 43 organisations responding.

Just over half of NHS Trusts 53 per cent who responded believe all unsanctioned cloud apps are completely blocked, yet at the same time fewer than one in five NHS Trusts 19 per cent confirmed that all cloud app use is monitored.

collect
0
Michael Hurlock 2017-07-27

burtosis writes: The FCC is being sued for failure to turn over documents related to "correspondence, e-mails, telephone call logs, calendar entries, meeting agendas," between chairman Ajit or his staff and ISPs.

Given the FCCs recent transparency issues, which appear to be directly ignoring the vast majority of feedback from Americans that are pro net neutrality, a nonprofit group called American Oversight is trying to force the real conversations the FCC is holding into public view.

They are also asking for any communications with the media, Congress, and congressional staff.

Two extensions for missed deadlines have been given, but the third extension was denied on July 24th.

The FCC also ignored a FOiA request by Ars for the DDoS attack during the public comment period on net neutrality.

With the current administration's attitude toward transparency and catering only to the largest corporate donors, will the American people have any meaningful influence in how the country is run anymore?

collect
0
Michael Marcano 2017-07-26
img

Probe finds widespread abuse of cop IT systems by personnel

A freedom-of-information request by Huntsman Security has discovered that UK police forces detected and investigated at least 779 cases of potential data misuse by personnel between January 2016 and April 2017.

Despite the high number of cases, the same request also revealed that the vast majority of the 34 police forces approached1 are taking steps to improve their monitoring systems.

For all but one of the forces, those plans include monitoring IT systems to ensure they aren't being accessed or used for unethical purposes.

The findings, out Wednesday, come just months after the government's official PEEL: Police Legitimacy 2016 report, which found that forces needed to do more to investigate and prevent staff abuse of IT systems and sensitive personal data, in order to assure public confidence.

Published in January 2017, the PEEL report investigated whether police forces and personnel were treating their privileged status ethically, and how this affected their legitimacy.

collect
0
Carlo Prine 2016-08-04
img

GIF FBI surveillance video taken during the Freddie Grey protests in 2015

The FBI has just released over 18 hours of surveillance video from the protests in Baltimore that followed the death of Freddie Grey in 2015.

According to the ACLU, the videos are all shot from traditional piloted aircraft.

It s unclear if these drones were piloted by police, protesters, curious onlookers, or all of the above.

The videos, which all date from April 29, 2015 to May 3, 2015, switch from infrared IR to traditional camera mode and zoom in at various times—though even at the maximum zoom it doesn t appear that any faces are clearly discernible.

GIF FBI surveillance video of the Freddie Grey protest showing a drone passing through the shot

collect
0
Bob Sun 2017-09-14
img

the EEC treaty in rome in 1957 defined the functioning of the internal market in order to ensure four basic rights: people, goods, services and wealth of free movement between member states.

the digitalization of altering the market industry at a time, has emerged the need to also the fifth EU fundamental rights – the freedom of information movement.

Consumers is even easier to choose a service provider but also their own domestic borders.

the raw data of the number of growth of research conditions to solve complex theoretical problems.

Transparent data sharing, private

Estonia set itself a clear objective just began the six-month presidency to: freedom of Information movement should be to the EU internal market, the five basic rights.

collect
0
Wayne Konwinski 2016-05-23
img

Freedom of information requests by the i newspaper show that there have been 49 proximity reports by pilots since April 2014.

Pilots have called for better safety regulation to prevent a collision.

Drone users are advised to consult Civil Aviation Authority regulations and obtain permission from landowners before flying their devices.

But the figures show that in the first four months of 2016, there were 15 reported near-misses, more than half of total of 29 in the previous 12 months.

Steve Landells, flight safety specialist at the British Airline Pilots Association Balpa , said: Unless action is taken, Balpa believes the risk of collision is unacceptably high.

Drones fitted with cameras must not be flown within 50m 164ft of people, vehicles or buildings, or over congested areas or large gatherings such as concerts and sports events.

David Reilly 2016-12-15
img

Concerns raised as Government Digital Services fails to hold on to top talent

In today s world of growing technological complexity, having access to the right mix and level of digital skills is vital for any organisation.

It s somewhat alarming then, that a Freedom of Information FOI request submitted by the BBC has revealed the Government Digital Service GDS lost ten senior personnel at deputy director level or above in the year to April 2016.

Not only that, as of March 2016 the organisation had 21 senior positions unfilled.

It should be deeply worrying to see some of the brightest talent in the civil service leaving public service to go and work in the private sector, said Tim Farron, leader of the Liberal Democrats.

Ministers need to make sure that staff feel empowered and engaged, and at the moment it s clear that many civil servants feel neither.

James Taylor 2016-11-24
img

European Union EU citizens can now get an idea of what their governments want – and are doing about – cryptography regulation.

The news is bleak: the responses to a survey sent to EU governments indicate widespread support for restricting citizens' access to encrypted communications.

As the freedom of information FOI cover letter from the Council of the EU's transparency unit explains, the survey was sent to members in September, following a discussion about crime.

So far, 25 countries have completed the questionnaire, and 11 provided their responses for publication.

Of those published in the FOI so far, what's particularly revealing to The Register is the disparity between different law enforcement agencies' views on encryption.

It's quite accurate, for example, for the Italian response to note that it's seeing HTTPS all over the place, given the concerted push by 'net luminaries to persuade site operators to employ it and therefore offer better protection to sensitive data.

Kevin Oconnor 2019-05-24
img

A series of Freedom of Information requests logged with our national NHS trusts show that the health providers remain a very, very long way away from being anything like paperless in their communications methods, with just 12 per cent of trusts offering a full digital internal communications dream.

Techradar has listed all the percentages and responses in the sort of meticulous and intricate detail you are never likely to get here, with the key takeaway being that the vast majority of NHS trusts are metaphorically miles away from getting anywhere near the 2020 paperless target and have barely started the massive chest-ache of digitising patient records and enabling digital communications between the many and varied teams, departments and outside organisations that work for our wellbeing.

Of the 53 NHS trusts that responded, 37 per cent said they'd managed to digitise more than half of their patient records.

That's about the most positive part of the data for NHS IT squads, as only a mere 16 of the trusts were able to provide a figure for how many entirely paper-based records they had created during Q4 of 2018 – and that stands at a whopping 1.7m.

Those fax machines aren't going anywhere yet.

Kristie Hernandez 2016-06-02
img

Pesky humans to blame as data breaches increase, an FOI request to the ICO reveals

People remain the weak link when it comes to corporate security after new data showed that human error is responsible for the bulk of all reported data breaches.

A Freedom of Information FOI request to the Information Commissioner s Office ICO , submitted by secure collaboration firm Egress, found human error accounts for 62 percent of all data breaches reported in the UK

Human Error

Whistleblower leak keyboard security breach CarpathianPrince Shutterstock

Other causes of data breaches include insecure webpages and hacking, which stands at 9 percent combined; data posted or faxed to the wrong recipient 17 percent ; loss and theft of paperwork 17 percent ; and data emailed to the wrong recipient 9 percent .

And somewhat depressingly, the FOI also revealed that data breaches are on the rise, after 66 percent of business sectors reported that they had experienced a rise in breaches over 3 years.

Well, the data revealed some surprises when it showed for example, that the courts and justice sector reported a 500 percent rise in data breaches.

The fact that so many breaches are caused by methods of working that are known data breach pitfalls – such as faxing and posting sensitive information, or using plaintext email – should be a major concern for all organisations, he added.

These figures are particularly worrying now that the EU s GDPR regulation is set to come into effect on May 25th 2018, meaning the clock is ticking for organisations across all industries to address the risk before hefty fines for data breaches are enforced.

David Bierman 2016-08-08
img

The National Reconnaissance Office headquarters in Fairfax, Virginia in 2010 Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images

If you re one of the country s most important spy agencies, you d probably have a pretty strict list of what documents to keep secret, right?

Well, judging from my latest FOIA request, the National Reconnaissance Office NRO might just be winging it.

Back in April, I filed a Freedom of Information request for a list of history papers held by the NRO, the American intelligence agency tasked with keeping an eye on the globe from satellites in space.

I was expecting to get more information than had already been released to other organizations like Government Attic back in 2012.

And a couple of days ago, I did.

Michael Hurlock 2017-07-27

burtosis writes: The FCC is being sued for failure to turn over documents related to "correspondence, e-mails, telephone call logs, calendar entries, meeting agendas," between chairman Ajit or his staff and ISPs.

Given the FCCs recent transparency issues, which appear to be directly ignoring the vast majority of feedback from Americans that are pro net neutrality, a nonprofit group called American Oversight is trying to force the real conversations the FCC is holding into public view.

They are also asking for any communications with the media, Congress, and congressional staff.

Two extensions for missed deadlines have been given, but the third extension was denied on July 24th.

The FCC also ignored a FOiA request by Ars for the DDoS attack during the public comment period on net neutrality.

With the current administration's attitude toward transparency and catering only to the largest corporate donors, will the American people have any meaningful influence in how the country is run anymore?

Carlo Prine 2016-08-04
img

GIF FBI surveillance video taken during the Freddie Grey protests in 2015

The FBI has just released over 18 hours of surveillance video from the protests in Baltimore that followed the death of Freddie Grey in 2015.

According to the ACLU, the videos are all shot from traditional piloted aircraft.

It s unclear if these drones were piloted by police, protesters, curious onlookers, or all of the above.

The videos, which all date from April 29, 2015 to May 3, 2015, switch from infrared IR to traditional camera mode and zoom in at various times—though even at the maximum zoom it doesn t appear that any faces are clearly discernible.

GIF FBI surveillance video of the Freddie Grey protest showing a drone passing through the shot

Alex Blair 2016-07-04
img

Boston Consulting doesn't want the people of New South Wales to know why it thinks a private college under police investigation is doing a better job than publicly-funded TAFEs.

Its report, compiled last year for an unknown price, was trumpeted as a win for vocational training privatisation advocates.

It found that the privately-run Australian Careers Network was more efficient than TAFE.

The problem for Boston: the report was released shortly after the company collapsed in a heap of recrimination and police investigation.

The risible report reckoned TAFE was uncompetitive, since it needed nearly $4 billion worth of buildings to deliver courses generating $2 billion of annual revenue.

The now-collapsed Australian Careers Network, by comparison, ran a revenue-to-property ratio of 10:1 $41 million in revenue, $4 million in property because, as it since emerged, it wasn't actually delivering the courses it was charging the government for.

Antonio Barron 2018-05-01
img

FOI reveals vulnerability of critical infrastructure ahead of NIS

With just eight days to go until the EU’s Network and Information Systems (NIS) Directive becomes legally enforceable, a Freedom of Information (FOI) request to 312 critical infrastructure providers across the UK is ringing industry alarm bells.

The FOI requests, submitted by DDoS attack solutions provider Corero Network Security, found that 70% of these institutions – ranging from police forces to NHS trusts, energy suppliers and water authorities – have had service outages in their IT systems within the last two years; many blamed on cyberattacks.

The implication for these institutions under the new directive would be the enforcement of hefty fines.

Under the NIS directive – which aims to raise levels of the overall security and resilience of network and information systems across the EU – these outages need to be reported and addressed.

Failure to do so could result in financial penalties of up to £17 Million being imposed.

Rodney Edson 2016-08-29
img

Your browser does not support HTML5 videoPlayPausePlayPauseMute0%00:00 / 00:00FullscreenSmallscreen Close Embed Feed In a related video - Pokemon Go: Tips and tricks to become the ultimate trainer IBTimes US

There have been nearly 300 Pokémon Go-related incidents reported to UK police since the game launched in July, a Freedom of Information FOI disclosure has revealed.

The widely popular smartphone application became an instant craze this year by using augmented reality AR to allow players to 'catch' Pokémon in the real world.

Yet the proliferation of the phenomenon has also resulted in a rise in criminal – and even national security – concerns.

Now, using requests for information from police forces across England and Wales, the BBC has uncovered the full extent of these complaints in the UK.

Revealing 290 logged cases in July alone, the FOI request disclosed a slew of reports including robberies, thefts, assaults and driving offences.

Sandra Wilson 2017-09-25
img

I quake at the imbecility of it," Tony Blair famously said.

Some 17 years ago the legislation came into force under Blair's government, a decision he bitterly regretted in his memoirs.

The intention of the act was to encourage "transparency and accountability" across public sector bodies.

Yet in the intervening years more government organisations have outsourced their services to the private sector, which is exempt under the FoI laws.

This is something The Register has increasingly encountered in our attempts to shine a light on UK government IT spend – an area strewn with costly mistakes.

Take for example the Cabinet Office's shared services centres, intended to save £400m by shifting all departments back office systems into two places.

Gary Meyer 2016-07-19
img

A new lawsuit alleges the Federal Bureau of Investigation is willfully avoiding granting access to documents requested under the Freedom of Information Act FOIA .

The lawsuit, filed by national security researcher and MIT Ph.D. candidate, Ryan Shapiro alleges the FBI is using an antiquated system that searches in the universal index of its legacy Automated Case Support system rather than two modern search applications the FBI has access to — a move he argues leads to failure by design and an inability to turn over requested documents due to the system s inability to find them.

When it comes to FOIA, the FBI is simply not operating in good faith, Shapiro told PC World.

Since the passage of the Freedom of Information Act, the FBI has viewed efforts to force bureau compliance with FOIA as a security threat.

The FBI, on the other hand, argues that the results are essentially the same no matter which search application it uses and that using the modern tools are unduly burdensome, and seriously wasteful of FBI resources.

It s important to note that the system Shapiro is at odds with was built in 1995 and according to Shapiro akin to using a library card catalog rather than a database containing scanned and searchable copies of every book in the collection.

Brandon Gaither 2016-09-30
img

Do we block unsanctioned ones?

Well half of us think we do...

Almost half of NHS Trusts make no attempt to monitor cloud app usage, according to the results of a Freedom of Information request.

The same FOI by cloud security firm Netskope also revealed that fewer than one-fifth of NHS Trusts have visibility into all cloud app use, leaving sensitive data vulnerable to both risky apps and malicious behaviour.

The FOI request was issued to 80 of the UK s Acute NHS Trusts, with 43 organisations responding.

Just over half of NHS Trusts 53 per cent who responded believe all unsanctioned cloud apps are completely blocked, yet at the same time fewer than one in five NHS Trusts 19 per cent confirmed that all cloud app use is monitored.

Michael Marcano 2017-07-26
img

Probe finds widespread abuse of cop IT systems by personnel

A freedom-of-information request by Huntsman Security has discovered that UK police forces detected and investigated at least 779 cases of potential data misuse by personnel between January 2016 and April 2017.

Despite the high number of cases, the same request also revealed that the vast majority of the 34 police forces approached1 are taking steps to improve their monitoring systems.

For all but one of the forces, those plans include monitoring IT systems to ensure they aren't being accessed or used for unethical purposes.

The findings, out Wednesday, come just months after the government's official PEEL: Police Legitimacy 2016 report, which found that forces needed to do more to investigate and prevent staff abuse of IT systems and sensitive personal data, in order to assure public confidence.

Published in January 2017, the PEEL report investigated whether police forces and personnel were treating their privileged status ethically, and how this affected their legitimacy.

Bob Sun 2017-09-14
img

the EEC treaty in rome in 1957 defined the functioning of the internal market in order to ensure four basic rights: people, goods, services and wealth of free movement between member states.

the digitalization of altering the market industry at a time, has emerged the need to also the fifth EU fundamental rights – the freedom of information movement.

Consumers is even easier to choose a service provider but also their own domestic borders.

the raw data of the number of growth of research conditions to solve complex theoretical problems.

Transparent data sharing, private

Estonia set itself a clear objective just began the six-month presidency to: freedom of Information movement should be to the EU internal market, the five basic rights.