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Eric Whitefield 2018-05-23
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Well, technically speaking, the gas giant's ring system takes regular hard poundings

A trio of physicists reckoned they’ve figured out why some of Saturn’s moons are so oddly shaped, with some looking like giant floating ravioli and others imitating stubby baguettes.

Saturn is most well known for its complex ring system and it is estimated that at least 62 moons are hiding amongst the structure so far.

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft revealed images of some of its inner moons and found that Pan and Atlas, measuring tens of kilometers across, had bulbous middles and flat circular edges, making them look like flying saucers, whereas Prometheus is larger and looks more like an elongated hexagon.

Martin Rubin, co-author of the study and a computational physicist at the University of Bern, said he was baffled when he saw the pictures.

“But then, we took the tidal forces into consideration and the problems piled up,” said Adrien Leleu, first author of the paper and a researcher at the University of Bern.

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0
Tom Snipes 2017-11-20
img

Juno space probe has sent back a number of images of Jupiter that show the planet from angles that are not often visible from the Earth and they are breathtakingly beautiful.

While the gas giant is well known for its "giant red spot", there are a lot of other features that are not as well known.

After Juno made a number of close flybys near Jupiter, scientists were able to get a closer look at the eight massive storms that seem to be constantly raging in the planet's atmosphere.

Juno flies close to the cloud tops, at around 3,400 km studying its atmosphere, attempting to learn more about Jupiter's origins and its makeup.

Jupiter's auroras are unique in the sense that they are intense and bright.

A team of researchers who are creating maps of Jupiter's x-ray emissions from its x-ray hotspots made a number of discoveries.

collect
0
James Baichan 2018-03-08
img

New pics make the gas giant's poles look like portals to hell

Jupiter has the strangest storm behavior observed to date, with formation patterns that have never been seen elsewhere.

The latest pictures taken from NASA’s Juno spacecraft reveal the hidden cyclones at its poles.

At the north pole, eight swirling storms circled another storm at the center, and at the south pole, another five storms encircle a central vortex.

The results have been analyzed in a paper published in Nature on Wednesday.

It is one of four papers presented in the scientific journal detailing different parts of Jupiter, including its cluster of cyclones, gravity field, its interior, and atmosphere.

collect
0
Thomas Owens 2019-06-06
img

A few nights ago, a friend asked, "What's that star?"

We looked up at a bright pinpoint shining above the horizon.

But that was no star.

The massive gas giant planet is showing off for us Earthlings this month.

Jupiter will reach opposition on Monday, June 10 in an annual event that marks the time when Earth is directly between the gas giant and the sun.

This means Jupiter is fairly close to Earth and you can spot it lurking in the sky all night long.

collect
0
William Mulcahy 2017-11-07
img

A new study suggests that, in their youth, Jupiter and other gas-giant planets may have been "steam worlds" — warm ocean planets a bit bigger than Earth, with water-vapor atmospheres.

John Chambers, a researcher at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, D.C., proposes that some protoplanets may grow into steam worlds from their modest beginnings as accretions of rock and ice pebbles.

[Gallery: The Strangest Alien Planets]

As the accreting bodies come together and the protoplanet grows, increasing pressure liquefies the ices, and oceans form.

Even a relatively small protoplanet of between 0.08 and 0.16 Earth masses can be quite warm — from 32 to 704 degrees Fahrenheit (0 to 347 degrees Celsius), Chambers said.

This view of Jupiter’s south pole was created using data from NASA’s Juno spacecraft, which has been orbiting the giant planet since July 2016.

collect
0
Garland Marsella 2017-11-01
img

Using an innovative new telescope array, an international team of researchers has discovered a distant gas giant roughly the size of Jupiter around a star half the size of ours.

New research published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society challenges prevailing theories about planet formation and how big planets can get in systems containing small stars, such as red dwarfs.

The discovery of NGTS-1b by Daniel Bayliss and Peter Wheatley from the University of Warwick’s Astronomy and Astrophysics Group represents only the third gas giant found to transit an M-dwarf star, and the largest planet in comparison to its host star.

The previous biggest planets in proportion to their companion stars were Kepler-45b and HATS-6b, but this new planet is considerably larger and heavier.

Bayliss and Wheatley spotted the hot Jupiter using the Next-Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) instrument, a wide-field observing facility composed of several telescopes at the European Southern Observatory’s Paranal Observatory in Northern Chile.

This state-of-the-art facility is operated by the Universities of Warwick, Leicester, Cambridge, Queen’s University Belfast, Observatoire de Genève, DLR Berlin, and Universidad de Chile.

collect
0
Troy Schindler 2016-07-06
img

NASA s Juno spacecraft has successfully entered orbit around the gas giant Jupiter.

After five years and 1.7 billion miles the tennis court-sized probe needed to accomplish a risky braking manoeuvre in order for it to be hooked by Jupiter s gravity.

In the early hours of this morning the team at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California received the confirmation signal which confirmed Juno had finally entered orbit.

For the next two years Juno begin the process of exploring Jupiter in unprecedented detail.

But what do we actually know about Jupiter?

Well it turns out we already know quite a lot, and what we do know is as fascinating as it is daunting:

collect
0
Joseph Wiles 2021-01-21
img
Researchers have been studying a gas-giant exoplanet called WASP-107b. During the study, they discovered the exoplanet’s core mass is much lower than what was previously believed to be necessary to build up the immense gas envelope surrounding gas-giant planets. Research conducted by the Université de Montréal suggests that gas-giant planets may form more easily than previously believed. Researchers believe the … Continue reading
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0
Steven Jones 2016-06-26

NASA's new image of Juno making its way to Jupiter

NASA has released new images of Jupiter as the Juno spacecraft edges close to the giant gas planet.

The robotic explorer is due to reach the planet on 4 July after a five-year, 1.4 billion-mile journey from Earth.

On 11 June, the robotic explorer began sending and receiving data around the clock to and from Earth as it prepares for the completion of its journey, NASA said on its website.

No previous spacecraft has orbited so close to Jupiter, although two others have been sent plunging to their destruction through its atmosphere.

Juno is due to spend a year in orbit around Jupiter, measuring the planet's water content, mapping its magnetic fields and searching for signs of a solid core.

With more than twice the mass of all its sibling planets combined, Jupiter is believed to hold a key piece to the puzzle of how the planets formed some 4.65 billion years ago from the gas and dust left over after the birth of the sun.

collect
0
Dion Esparza 2017-05-08

p NASA’s latest image of Jupiter is perhaps its most stunning yet for the simple reason that it shows us a side of the gas giant that we almost never see: The south pole.

This incredible image was compiled by citizen scientist Gabriel Fiset who built the image using the publicly available images and data captured by the Juno probe currently orbiting the gas giant.

The image you’re looking at was capture by JunoCam back on the 11th December, 2016.

As a testament to Jupiter’s almost unimaginable size, the image was taken at an altitude of 32,400 miles.

While the Jupiter’s equator is a vast ribbon of browns and oranges, the gas giant’s south pole is a completely different story.

Cyclones swirl around the south pole, and white oval storms can be seen near the limb ― the apparent edge of the planet.

collect
0
John Johannes 2017-11-01
img

A new paper adds to that list by describing a gas giant planet that orbits a dwarf star, creating a situation where the planet is 25 percent the size of its host—the smallest difference between planet and star yet observed.

The same is true for super-Earths and Neptune-sized planets.

Based in Chile, the project is an array of a dozen small telescopes (20cm aperture) hooked up to red-sensitive CCD cameras.

An automated system has the telescopes survey a population of about 20,000 stars, looking for periodic dimming caused as planets transit between the star and Earth.

The red sensitivity of the cameras allows the system to work with dwarf stars, which produce much redder light than the Sun.

As the host of the first planet discovered with the new hardware, the star picked up the name NGTS-1, with the planet NGTS-1b.

collect
0
Robert Tuohy 2016-08-23
img

Astronomers have discovered a highly inflated gas giant nearly twice the size of Jupiter orbiting a 2bn-year-old star.

The planet is one of the most inflated hot Jupiters ever detected with a radius 1.79 times the size of our solar system s biggest planet.

The rapid expansion of the exoplanet is a fate that often befalls gas giants towards the end of their parent star s life.

But the international research team behind the discovery haven t yet determined exactly why the planet has swollen so much.

Scientists believe the inflation is either caused by a deposition of energy from the host star, or due to inhibited cooling of the planet.

The inflated planets are named hot Jupiters after the largest of our gas giants.

collect
0
Jose Wenger 2017-05-26
img

p Juno beholds a not-so-gentle giant

The Juno spacecraft snapped this photo of the gas giant, Jupiter, in August.

Taken from an altitude of about 32,000 miles, we can see the planet's south pole and dozens of Earth-sized hurricanes in stunning detail.

The probe arrived at the planet in June and makes a flyover every 53 days, at which point the probe uses eight instruments to collect data for roughly two hours.

Once this information has been transmitted back to Earth, this file takes 36 hours for NASA to download.

Along with these sophisticated instruments, Juno packs a few other surprising items, including a trio of Lego passengers: The Roman god Jupiter, his wife Juno, and -- last but certainly not least -- Galileo.

collect
0
Edward Hudson 2016-10-14
img

After re-examining data acquired by the Voyager 2 spacecraft, astronomers have detected wavy patterns in two of Uranus s dark system of rings—patterns that may be indicative of two undiscovered moons.

Like the other gas giants in our solar system, Uranus features a ring system, though it s not nearly as spectacular as the one around Saturn.

And like the other gas giants, Uranus hosts a batch of natural satellites—27 to be exact.

New research suggests this number might have to be revised; data collected by Voyager 2 during its historic 1986 flyby hints at two undiscovered moons lurking around a pair of Uranus s rings.

Uranus is almost 20 times farther from the sun than the Earth, making direct observations difficult.

But it appears the probe s satellite-hunting days aren t over just yet.

collect
0
Betty Saliba 2016-07-05
img

The Juno spacecraft safely reached orbit at Jupiter on the night of July 4th.

Traveling at a speed of 165,000 mph toward a swirling gas giant Monday night, the Juno spacecraft would have no second chances.

But Juno needed no second chance late on the night of July 4th as its hardy little engine fired for a total 2,102 seconds, perfect to within one second, inserting the spacecraft neatly into orbit around Jupiter.

Back on Earth engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California cheered heartily.

During the last five years a team of 300 engineers have guided Juno along its path.

Moments after the orbital insertion Scott Bolton, the mission s principal investigator, saluted the team of engineers, telling them they were the best ever.

collect
0
Brian Plymel 2017-06-28
img

Scientists have found one of the craziest exoplanets yet.

It's a huge gas giant not unlike our Solar System's own Jupiter, but it travels around its star in just 1.5 days, with a surface hotter than most stars.

The planet orbits a blazing star called KELT-9, which is some 650 light-years away.

It's the first time astronomers have detected a planet near a star this hot, and it's different from anything they've seen before.

The reason for this insane heat is the intimate proximity the gas giant has to its host star, which is itself among some of the hottest stars we know, reaching temperatures of roughly 10,170 Kelvin.

As a gas giant, KELT-9b is actually 2.8 times more massive than Jupiter, but only half as dense, as its atmosphere is constantly blasted by its intense host star.

collect
0
Eric Whitefield 2018-05-23
img

Well, technically speaking, the gas giant's ring system takes regular hard poundings

A trio of physicists reckoned they’ve figured out why some of Saturn’s moons are so oddly shaped, with some looking like giant floating ravioli and others imitating stubby baguettes.

Saturn is most well known for its complex ring system and it is estimated that at least 62 moons are hiding amongst the structure so far.

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft revealed images of some of its inner moons and found that Pan and Atlas, measuring tens of kilometers across, had bulbous middles and flat circular edges, making them look like flying saucers, whereas Prometheus is larger and looks more like an elongated hexagon.

Martin Rubin, co-author of the study and a computational physicist at the University of Bern, said he was baffled when he saw the pictures.

“But then, we took the tidal forces into consideration and the problems piled up,” said Adrien Leleu, first author of the paper and a researcher at the University of Bern.

James Baichan 2018-03-08
img

New pics make the gas giant's poles look like portals to hell

Jupiter has the strangest storm behavior observed to date, with formation patterns that have never been seen elsewhere.

The latest pictures taken from NASA’s Juno spacecraft reveal the hidden cyclones at its poles.

At the north pole, eight swirling storms circled another storm at the center, and at the south pole, another five storms encircle a central vortex.

The results have been analyzed in a paper published in Nature on Wednesday.

It is one of four papers presented in the scientific journal detailing different parts of Jupiter, including its cluster of cyclones, gravity field, its interior, and atmosphere.

William Mulcahy 2017-11-07
img

A new study suggests that, in their youth, Jupiter and other gas-giant planets may have been "steam worlds" — warm ocean planets a bit bigger than Earth, with water-vapor atmospheres.

John Chambers, a researcher at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, D.C., proposes that some protoplanets may grow into steam worlds from their modest beginnings as accretions of rock and ice pebbles.

[Gallery: The Strangest Alien Planets]

As the accreting bodies come together and the protoplanet grows, increasing pressure liquefies the ices, and oceans form.

Even a relatively small protoplanet of between 0.08 and 0.16 Earth masses can be quite warm — from 32 to 704 degrees Fahrenheit (0 to 347 degrees Celsius), Chambers said.

This view of Jupiter’s south pole was created using data from NASA’s Juno spacecraft, which has been orbiting the giant planet since July 2016.

Troy Schindler 2016-07-06
img

NASA s Juno spacecraft has successfully entered orbit around the gas giant Jupiter.

After five years and 1.7 billion miles the tennis court-sized probe needed to accomplish a risky braking manoeuvre in order for it to be hooked by Jupiter s gravity.

In the early hours of this morning the team at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California received the confirmation signal which confirmed Juno had finally entered orbit.

For the next two years Juno begin the process of exploring Jupiter in unprecedented detail.

But what do we actually know about Jupiter?

Well it turns out we already know quite a lot, and what we do know is as fascinating as it is daunting:

Steven Jones 2016-06-26

NASA's new image of Juno making its way to Jupiter

NASA has released new images of Jupiter as the Juno spacecraft edges close to the giant gas planet.

The robotic explorer is due to reach the planet on 4 July after a five-year, 1.4 billion-mile journey from Earth.

On 11 June, the robotic explorer began sending and receiving data around the clock to and from Earth as it prepares for the completion of its journey, NASA said on its website.

No previous spacecraft has orbited so close to Jupiter, although two others have been sent plunging to their destruction through its atmosphere.

Juno is due to spend a year in orbit around Jupiter, measuring the planet's water content, mapping its magnetic fields and searching for signs of a solid core.

With more than twice the mass of all its sibling planets combined, Jupiter is believed to hold a key piece to the puzzle of how the planets formed some 4.65 billion years ago from the gas and dust left over after the birth of the sun.

John Johannes 2017-11-01
img

A new paper adds to that list by describing a gas giant planet that orbits a dwarf star, creating a situation where the planet is 25 percent the size of its host—the smallest difference between planet and star yet observed.

The same is true for super-Earths and Neptune-sized planets.

Based in Chile, the project is an array of a dozen small telescopes (20cm aperture) hooked up to red-sensitive CCD cameras.

An automated system has the telescopes survey a population of about 20,000 stars, looking for periodic dimming caused as planets transit between the star and Earth.

The red sensitivity of the cameras allows the system to work with dwarf stars, which produce much redder light than the Sun.

As the host of the first planet discovered with the new hardware, the star picked up the name NGTS-1, with the planet NGTS-1b.

Jose Wenger 2017-05-26
img

p Juno beholds a not-so-gentle giant

The Juno spacecraft snapped this photo of the gas giant, Jupiter, in August.

Taken from an altitude of about 32,000 miles, we can see the planet's south pole and dozens of Earth-sized hurricanes in stunning detail.

The probe arrived at the planet in June and makes a flyover every 53 days, at which point the probe uses eight instruments to collect data for roughly two hours.

Once this information has been transmitted back to Earth, this file takes 36 hours for NASA to download.

Along with these sophisticated instruments, Juno packs a few other surprising items, including a trio of Lego passengers: The Roman god Jupiter, his wife Juno, and -- last but certainly not least -- Galileo.

Betty Saliba 2016-07-05
img

The Juno spacecraft safely reached orbit at Jupiter on the night of July 4th.

Traveling at a speed of 165,000 mph toward a swirling gas giant Monday night, the Juno spacecraft would have no second chances.

But Juno needed no second chance late on the night of July 4th as its hardy little engine fired for a total 2,102 seconds, perfect to within one second, inserting the spacecraft neatly into orbit around Jupiter.

Back on Earth engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California cheered heartily.

During the last five years a team of 300 engineers have guided Juno along its path.

Moments after the orbital insertion Scott Bolton, the mission s principal investigator, saluted the team of engineers, telling them they were the best ever.

Tom Snipes 2017-11-20
img

Juno space probe has sent back a number of images of Jupiter that show the planet from angles that are not often visible from the Earth and they are breathtakingly beautiful.

While the gas giant is well known for its "giant red spot", there are a lot of other features that are not as well known.

After Juno made a number of close flybys near Jupiter, scientists were able to get a closer look at the eight massive storms that seem to be constantly raging in the planet's atmosphere.

Juno flies close to the cloud tops, at around 3,400 km studying its atmosphere, attempting to learn more about Jupiter's origins and its makeup.

Jupiter's auroras are unique in the sense that they are intense and bright.

A team of researchers who are creating maps of Jupiter's x-ray emissions from its x-ray hotspots made a number of discoveries.

Thomas Owens 2019-06-06
img

A few nights ago, a friend asked, "What's that star?"

We looked up at a bright pinpoint shining above the horizon.

But that was no star.

The massive gas giant planet is showing off for us Earthlings this month.

Jupiter will reach opposition on Monday, June 10 in an annual event that marks the time when Earth is directly between the gas giant and the sun.

This means Jupiter is fairly close to Earth and you can spot it lurking in the sky all night long.

Garland Marsella 2017-11-01
img

Using an innovative new telescope array, an international team of researchers has discovered a distant gas giant roughly the size of Jupiter around a star half the size of ours.

New research published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society challenges prevailing theories about planet formation and how big planets can get in systems containing small stars, such as red dwarfs.

The discovery of NGTS-1b by Daniel Bayliss and Peter Wheatley from the University of Warwick’s Astronomy and Astrophysics Group represents only the third gas giant found to transit an M-dwarf star, and the largest planet in comparison to its host star.

The previous biggest planets in proportion to their companion stars were Kepler-45b and HATS-6b, but this new planet is considerably larger and heavier.

Bayliss and Wheatley spotted the hot Jupiter using the Next-Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) instrument, a wide-field observing facility composed of several telescopes at the European Southern Observatory’s Paranal Observatory in Northern Chile.

This state-of-the-art facility is operated by the Universities of Warwick, Leicester, Cambridge, Queen’s University Belfast, Observatoire de Genève, DLR Berlin, and Universidad de Chile.

Joseph Wiles 2021-01-21
img
Researchers have been studying a gas-giant exoplanet called WASP-107b. During the study, they discovered the exoplanet’s core mass is much lower than what was previously believed to be necessary to build up the immense gas envelope surrounding gas-giant planets. Research conducted by the Université de Montréal suggests that gas-giant planets may form more easily than previously believed. Researchers believe the … Continue reading
Dion Esparza 2017-05-08

p NASA’s latest image of Jupiter is perhaps its most stunning yet for the simple reason that it shows us a side of the gas giant that we almost never see: The south pole.

This incredible image was compiled by citizen scientist Gabriel Fiset who built the image using the publicly available images and data captured by the Juno probe currently orbiting the gas giant.

The image you’re looking at was capture by JunoCam back on the 11th December, 2016.

As a testament to Jupiter’s almost unimaginable size, the image was taken at an altitude of 32,400 miles.

While the Jupiter’s equator is a vast ribbon of browns and oranges, the gas giant’s south pole is a completely different story.

Cyclones swirl around the south pole, and white oval storms can be seen near the limb ― the apparent edge of the planet.

Robert Tuohy 2016-08-23
img

Astronomers have discovered a highly inflated gas giant nearly twice the size of Jupiter orbiting a 2bn-year-old star.

The planet is one of the most inflated hot Jupiters ever detected with a radius 1.79 times the size of our solar system s biggest planet.

The rapid expansion of the exoplanet is a fate that often befalls gas giants towards the end of their parent star s life.

But the international research team behind the discovery haven t yet determined exactly why the planet has swollen so much.

Scientists believe the inflation is either caused by a deposition of energy from the host star, or due to inhibited cooling of the planet.

The inflated planets are named hot Jupiters after the largest of our gas giants.

Edward Hudson 2016-10-14
img

After re-examining data acquired by the Voyager 2 spacecraft, astronomers have detected wavy patterns in two of Uranus s dark system of rings—patterns that may be indicative of two undiscovered moons.

Like the other gas giants in our solar system, Uranus features a ring system, though it s not nearly as spectacular as the one around Saturn.

And like the other gas giants, Uranus hosts a batch of natural satellites—27 to be exact.

New research suggests this number might have to be revised; data collected by Voyager 2 during its historic 1986 flyby hints at two undiscovered moons lurking around a pair of Uranus s rings.

Uranus is almost 20 times farther from the sun than the Earth, making direct observations difficult.

But it appears the probe s satellite-hunting days aren t over just yet.

Brian Plymel 2017-06-28
img

Scientists have found one of the craziest exoplanets yet.

It's a huge gas giant not unlike our Solar System's own Jupiter, but it travels around its star in just 1.5 days, with a surface hotter than most stars.

The planet orbits a blazing star called KELT-9, which is some 650 light-years away.

It's the first time astronomers have detected a planet near a star this hot, and it's different from anything they've seen before.

The reason for this insane heat is the intimate proximity the gas giant has to its host star, which is itself among some of the hottest stars we know, reaching temperatures of roughly 10,170 Kelvin.

As a gas giant, KELT-9b is actually 2.8 times more massive than Jupiter, but only half as dense, as its atmosphere is constantly blasted by its intense host star.