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William Garza 2017-01-04
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U.S. Navy-trained dolphins are being tapped to save the world s smallest porpoise, an extremely elusive creature that is in the verge of extinction in the Gulf of California.

Experts are hoping dolphins natural sonar will be able to do what technology has not: locate them, so they can be captured and put in a protective area.

"Their specific task is to locate vaquitas , said Jim Fallin of the U.S. Navy Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific.

Fallin said the dolphins were trained by the Navy Marine Mammal Program for tasks like locating sea mines.

Experts believe fewer than 60 vaquitas are left in the Gulf waters – they have been decimated by illegal fishing for the swim bladder of a fish, the totoaba, which is a prized delicacy in China.

Although the vaquita has never been held successfully in captivity, experts hope to put the remaining porpoises in floating pens in a safe bay in the Gulf of California, also known as the Sea of Cortez, where they can be protected and hopefully breed.

collect
0
Angela Skipper 2017-12-20
img

Individually, these six-to-eight pound fish are noisy, but when packed together along a 16-mile strip (27 km) of the Colorado River Delta, their collective roar is nothing short of astounding—shaking the hulls of passing ships and threatening the hearing of any aquatic animal who dares to swim close.

Their mating behavior can be tied to tidal and lunar cycles, making them particularly vulnerable to fishermen, who can time the fish’s arrival to the minute.

What’s more, the audible cacophony produced by the male corvina leads the fishers to their exact location.

During the spawning season, a single net can catch up to two tons of corvina within a matter of minutes, and an entire fishing fleet can harvest up to 5,900 tons, or 2 million corvina, in just 20 days.

To learn more about these remarkable fish and the sounds they make, Brad Erisman from the University of Texas and Timothy Rowell from the University of California-San Diego set up camp along the Colorado River in 2014, conducting acoustic surveys of the fish during peak periods in March and April.

The highest measurement was 190 decibels (dB) using a peak-to-peak measurement, and the peak RMS (root mean square) was 177 decibels.

collect
0
Robert Massaro 2020-08-28
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA infrared imagery revealed a burst of strength in Tropical Storm Hernan, located over the Gulf of California. At 12:30 a.m. EDT, NOAA's National Hurricane Center or NHC noted that recent satellite-based wind data indicated Hernan was located northeast of previous estimates.
collect
0
Jose Hilton 2019-01-21
img

Scientists from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute have discovered two species of fish that can thrive in waters that are nearly devoid of oxygen.

The two fish species are catsharks and cusk eels.

The researchers found high abundances of fish living in deep Gulf of California waters with almost no dissolved oxygen.

These fish are described as low-oxygen extremophiles.

The region of the gulf they live in is over 1,000 meters or 3,280-feet deep, and in many places, the environment has very little oxygen.

These regions have less than 3% of the oxygen concentration found at the ocean’s surface.

collect
0
Michael Lofton 2016-11-18
img

A rare species of fish and the world s smallest porpoise – both face extinction as poachers work the waters of Mexico s Gulf of California to meet the growing demand in Asian markets for the fish s swim bladder.

The totoaba – the world s largest type of drum fish – was once a ubiquitous presence in the Gulf of California, but illegal fishing fueled by demand in China for its swim bladder has decimated the fish s population and led the Mexican government to outlaw fishing for the totoaba and to heavily monitor its home waters.

Adding to the situation is the widespread use of gillnets, which unintentionally trap other species such as the vaquita – a tiny porpoise whose worldwide population is estimated to be less than 60 – which poachers fish for totoaba.

Enforcing the ban is always difficult because when you have something that is in high demand and can fetch high prices, the incentive is still there for illegal fisherman, Leigh Henry, a senior policy advisor at the World Wildlife Fund WWF told FoxNews.com.

The fish s swim bladders, which help them maintain buoyancy, can fetch over $60,000 per kilogram — more than a kilo of cocaine – and are used in traditional Chinese medicine as a treatment a treatment for fertility, circulatory and skin problems.

This March 2013 image provided by the U.S. attorney's Office shows Totoaba bladders displayed at a U.S. border crossing in downtown Calexico, Mexico.

collect
0
Bill Brown 2017-05-19
img

p Vaquitas are cartoonish-looking porpoises that swim around, bothering literally no one.

These little guys, which only weigh about 120 pounds, are found in just one region in the world — the Northern Gulf of California.

Their nickname — the “panda” porpoise — comes from the dark rings around their eyes, similar to that of the much-beloved bear.

Sadly, over the years, vaquita numbers have plummeted dramatically due to unscrupulous fishing practices and as a result, there are less than 30 left in the wild—according to the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), unless urgent action is taken, the porpoises could be extinct by next July.

“The vaquita lives only in the northern part of this World Heritage site‒an area affected by illegal and unsustainable fishing practices and wildlife trafficking of the critically endangered totoaba fish, together with urbanisation and increased pollution,” the WWF said in a recently released report on vaquita welfare.

“Failure to act will result in the imminent extinction of the vaquita.”

collect
0
James Lamb 2016-10-11
img

Plenty of geological features have yet to be discovered and understood—especially where things get watery, or subterranean, or both.

Case in point: a team of seismologists recently discovered what they believe is a fault line running along the the eastern shore of the Salton Sea in southern California.

Sounds like something people should have known about, right?

The team that found the fault wasn t even looking for it.

They were part of a National Science Foundation-funded project to get some seismic images of the Salton Sea which has a seriously weird history—early 20th century engineers accidentally made it while rerouting the Colorado River .

Given it s proximity to the Gulf of California rift zone and the San Andreas fault, they were looking for some prime geological weirdness in the salt rock basin.

collect
0
Walter Winkel 2019-05-21
img

“It is absolutely gillnets,” said Cynthia Smith, Executive Director for America's National Marine Mammal Foundation (NMMF).

Gillnets are coarse nylon fishing nets popular in artisanal fisheries and used across the Gulf of California.

On top of that, illegal fishing of the critically endangered totoaba fish has taken place since the late 1980s.

The totoaba’s fish bladder, or “maw,” is in high demand in China and in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) markets around the world, where it can fetch more money than gold or cocaine.

Like many species around the world, the porpoise was getting caught in the crosshairs of wildlife crime.

Andrea Crosta is a crime intelligence expert and the Executive Director of the Elephant Action League (EAL), an organisation with a mission of protecting wildlife and the environment through intelligence and investigative operations.

collect
0
Edmond Garcia 2018-03-05
img

Lacoste is the latest company to find a creative way to use its platform and wide reach for good.

To support wildlife conservation, the fashion brand has replaced its iconic alligator chest patch with 10 different animals.

Each of the 10 animals that appears in a new limited line of Lacoste polo shirts represents a threatened species.

In partnership with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Lacoste only made 1,775 of these shirts, and the number of shirts it produced with each new animal corresponded to the number of that species left living in the wild.

The most threatened species Lacoste featured was the Gulf of California porpoise -- the company only made 30 shirts with this animal.

It manufactured 450 shirts with the Cyclone of Anegada Island (a species of iguana).

collect
0
John Ruybal 2019-04-04
img

Scientists have discovered a strange and mesmerizingly beautiful space thousands of feet below the ocean's surface.

The otherworldly ecosystem features 75-foot towers containing volcanic flanges that create the illusion of looking at a mirror when one observes the super-hot hydrothermal fluids beneath them.

The gorgeous visuals provide a rare window into a world that looks like something cooked up by James Cameron for the "Avatar" sequels.

Scientists aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute's research vessel Falkor made the discovery during an expedition to study hydrothermal and gas plumes more than 6,500 feet below the surface of the ocean in the Gulf of California.

RUSSIAN ROCKET EN ROUTE TO INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION TO DELIVER SUPPLIES TO ASTRONAUTS

"We discovered remarkable towers where every surface was occupied by some type of life," Mandy Joyce, a marine scientist from the University of Georgia, said in a statement.

collect
0
David Clary 2019-04-04
img

Thanks to some enterprising underwater explorers, I am now a firm believer that the sea floor contains portals to a Stranger Things-esque Upside Down.

A team of researchers from the Schmidt Ocean Institute have been spending their days exploring the depths of the Gulf of California as part of the "Microbial Mysteries" expedition.

Over the past month, the team has been sampling the area, snapping video from about 1.2 miles (approx.

In that time they've gathered data to detail the microbial communities and metabolism of the deep and gain a better understanding of how microbes live around hydrothermal vents and cold seeps.

In the alien, extreme environment of the deep, it's remarkable to see life thriving and using the nutrient-rich vents and seeps to keep themselves alive.

But it was another geological formation, caused by an underwater volcano, that offered the biggest surprise.

collect
0
Alan Krieg 2019-04-08
img

In the Gulf of California, Mexico, a team of researchers dove deep and found a series of venting mineral towers.

These towers were up to 10 meters across, 23 meters tall, and were “teeming with biodiversity and potentially novel fauna.” And they were colorful – so very colorful.

The most shocking part about this situation is the fact that these same spots were visited a decade ago and none of what we see here was there – it’s all new!

Large amounts of new hydrothermal venting popped up in the past 10 years, providing for an ever-changing underwater landscape in the area.

The team aimed to “identify and quantify habitat-specific microbial populations,” and BOY did they find their fill.

“This is an amazing natural laboratory to document incredible organisms and better understand how they survive in extremely challenging environments,” said Dr. Mandy Joye (University of Georgia).

collect
0
James Dalporto 2019-01-21
img

Cocaine is causing some eels in London's famous River Thames to be "hyperactive," new research by King's College London shows.

A team of scientists at the university studied wastewater that's entering into the river from nearby sewers during storms and found traces of the drug within 24 hours of the overflow, the Independent reports.

Compared to other major cities, the level of cocaine entering London's water system — likely through users' urine — is much higher.

"Increases in caffeine, cocaine and benzoylecgonine [a metabolite] were observed 24 hours after sewer overflow events,' King's College London researchers said in a paper that detailed their findings, according to the Evening Standard.

BIZARRE DEEP-SEA FISH LIVING IN GULF OF CALIFORNIA WITH 'VIRTUALLY NO OXYGEN' PUZZLES BIOLOGISTS

London's water treatment plants are tasked with purifying the water but major storms reportedly "overwhelm" the operations and allow some sewage water to make its way into the river.

collect
0
David Shiner 2019-04-09
img

Deep in the Gulf of California, scientists have discovered a fantastical expanse of hydrothermal vents, full of crystallized gases, glimmering pools of piping-hot fluids and rainbow-hued life-forms.

A decade ago, scientists visiting this spot saw nothing unusual; this psychedelic seascape seems to have built up around an increase in hydrothermal venting — spots in the seafloor where mineral-laden and superhot water jets out — in the last 10 years.

"Astonishing is not strong enough of a word," said Mandy Joye, a marine biologist at the University of Georgia, who led the team that discovered the vents.

"We saw a lot of really interesting topography, which made me scratch my head," Joye said.

Nearly 6,000 feet (1,800 m) below the surface, they saw the vents that were carpeted with microbes, marine worms and species they didn't recognize.

Most likely, Joye said, new vents have opened since then, or the rate of hydrothermal fluid flow has increased.

collect
0
Troy Jones 2019-04-08
img

Scientists researching the microbial life on volcanic vents uncovered more incredible ocean landscapes from the seafloor off the coast of California.

An international team, led by University of Georgia associate professor Samantha Joye, set out to explore sites in both the northern and southern Gulf of California, analysing how microorganisms live in the hot waters by the the vents.

These images come from the ROV SuBastian, a remotely operated sub that can take samples and image the area around these vents, operated from the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s research vessel, Falkor.

“We discovered remarkable towers where every surface was occupied by some type of life.

The vibrant colors found on the ‘living rocks’ was striking, and reflects a diversity in biological composition as well as mineral distributions,” Joye said in a news release.

The scientists are collecting microbes and analysing their DNA from the boat using handheld sequencers, according to the Schmidt Ocean Institute website, then switching to more advanced equipment on shore.

collect
0
Christopher Driskell 2019-08-02
img

There are now less than 19 individual vaquita porpoises left in the wild, according to an alarming new survey.

If fishing nets continue to be used illegally off the coast of Mexico, vaquita porpoises (Phocoena sinus) will likely become extinct within a year, according to new research published in Royal Society Open Science.

As the new research shows, and despite measures taken by the Mexican government in 2015 to crack down on the use of illegal nets, the population of vaquita porpoises continues to decline.

On average, females measure around 140 centimeters (55 inches) in length, while males are slightly shorter at 135 centimeters (53 inches) long.

Vaquitas, which translates to “small cow” in Spanish, have a gray or white complexion, a tall dorsal fin, dark eye rings, and long flippers.

To that end, they recorded the echolocating clicks made by vaquitas across a large grid of acoustic sensors spread across the water.

collect
0
William Garza 2017-01-04
img

U.S. Navy-trained dolphins are being tapped to save the world s smallest porpoise, an extremely elusive creature that is in the verge of extinction in the Gulf of California.

Experts are hoping dolphins natural sonar will be able to do what technology has not: locate them, so they can be captured and put in a protective area.

"Their specific task is to locate vaquitas , said Jim Fallin of the U.S. Navy Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific.

Fallin said the dolphins were trained by the Navy Marine Mammal Program for tasks like locating sea mines.

Experts believe fewer than 60 vaquitas are left in the Gulf waters – they have been decimated by illegal fishing for the swim bladder of a fish, the totoaba, which is a prized delicacy in China.

Although the vaquita has never been held successfully in captivity, experts hope to put the remaining porpoises in floating pens in a safe bay in the Gulf of California, also known as the Sea of Cortez, where they can be protected and hopefully breed.

Robert Massaro 2020-08-28
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA infrared imagery revealed a burst of strength in Tropical Storm Hernan, located over the Gulf of California. At 12:30 a.m. EDT, NOAA's National Hurricane Center or NHC noted that recent satellite-based wind data indicated Hernan was located northeast of previous estimates.
Michael Lofton 2016-11-18
img

A rare species of fish and the world s smallest porpoise – both face extinction as poachers work the waters of Mexico s Gulf of California to meet the growing demand in Asian markets for the fish s swim bladder.

The totoaba – the world s largest type of drum fish – was once a ubiquitous presence in the Gulf of California, but illegal fishing fueled by demand in China for its swim bladder has decimated the fish s population and led the Mexican government to outlaw fishing for the totoaba and to heavily monitor its home waters.

Adding to the situation is the widespread use of gillnets, which unintentionally trap other species such as the vaquita – a tiny porpoise whose worldwide population is estimated to be less than 60 – which poachers fish for totoaba.

Enforcing the ban is always difficult because when you have something that is in high demand and can fetch high prices, the incentive is still there for illegal fisherman, Leigh Henry, a senior policy advisor at the World Wildlife Fund WWF told FoxNews.com.

The fish s swim bladders, which help them maintain buoyancy, can fetch over $60,000 per kilogram — more than a kilo of cocaine – and are used in traditional Chinese medicine as a treatment a treatment for fertility, circulatory and skin problems.

This March 2013 image provided by the U.S. attorney's Office shows Totoaba bladders displayed at a U.S. border crossing in downtown Calexico, Mexico.

James Lamb 2016-10-11
img

Plenty of geological features have yet to be discovered and understood—especially where things get watery, or subterranean, or both.

Case in point: a team of seismologists recently discovered what they believe is a fault line running along the the eastern shore of the Salton Sea in southern California.

Sounds like something people should have known about, right?

The team that found the fault wasn t even looking for it.

They were part of a National Science Foundation-funded project to get some seismic images of the Salton Sea which has a seriously weird history—early 20th century engineers accidentally made it while rerouting the Colorado River .

Given it s proximity to the Gulf of California rift zone and the San Andreas fault, they were looking for some prime geological weirdness in the salt rock basin.

Edmond Garcia 2018-03-05
img

Lacoste is the latest company to find a creative way to use its platform and wide reach for good.

To support wildlife conservation, the fashion brand has replaced its iconic alligator chest patch with 10 different animals.

Each of the 10 animals that appears in a new limited line of Lacoste polo shirts represents a threatened species.

In partnership with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Lacoste only made 1,775 of these shirts, and the number of shirts it produced with each new animal corresponded to the number of that species left living in the wild.

The most threatened species Lacoste featured was the Gulf of California porpoise -- the company only made 30 shirts with this animal.

It manufactured 450 shirts with the Cyclone of Anegada Island (a species of iguana).

David Clary 2019-04-04
img

Thanks to some enterprising underwater explorers, I am now a firm believer that the sea floor contains portals to a Stranger Things-esque Upside Down.

A team of researchers from the Schmidt Ocean Institute have been spending their days exploring the depths of the Gulf of California as part of the "Microbial Mysteries" expedition.

Over the past month, the team has been sampling the area, snapping video from about 1.2 miles (approx.

In that time they've gathered data to detail the microbial communities and metabolism of the deep and gain a better understanding of how microbes live around hydrothermal vents and cold seeps.

In the alien, extreme environment of the deep, it's remarkable to see life thriving and using the nutrient-rich vents and seeps to keep themselves alive.

But it was another geological formation, caused by an underwater volcano, that offered the biggest surprise.

James Dalporto 2019-01-21
img

Cocaine is causing some eels in London's famous River Thames to be "hyperactive," new research by King's College London shows.

A team of scientists at the university studied wastewater that's entering into the river from nearby sewers during storms and found traces of the drug within 24 hours of the overflow, the Independent reports.

Compared to other major cities, the level of cocaine entering London's water system — likely through users' urine — is much higher.

"Increases in caffeine, cocaine and benzoylecgonine [a metabolite] were observed 24 hours after sewer overflow events,' King's College London researchers said in a paper that detailed their findings, according to the Evening Standard.

BIZARRE DEEP-SEA FISH LIVING IN GULF OF CALIFORNIA WITH 'VIRTUALLY NO OXYGEN' PUZZLES BIOLOGISTS

London's water treatment plants are tasked with purifying the water but major storms reportedly "overwhelm" the operations and allow some sewage water to make its way into the river.

Troy Jones 2019-04-08
img

Scientists researching the microbial life on volcanic vents uncovered more incredible ocean landscapes from the seafloor off the coast of California.

An international team, led by University of Georgia associate professor Samantha Joye, set out to explore sites in both the northern and southern Gulf of California, analysing how microorganisms live in the hot waters by the the vents.

These images come from the ROV SuBastian, a remotely operated sub that can take samples and image the area around these vents, operated from the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s research vessel, Falkor.

“We discovered remarkable towers where every surface was occupied by some type of life.

The vibrant colors found on the ‘living rocks’ was striking, and reflects a diversity in biological composition as well as mineral distributions,” Joye said in a news release.

The scientists are collecting microbes and analysing their DNA from the boat using handheld sequencers, according to the Schmidt Ocean Institute website, then switching to more advanced equipment on shore.

Angela Skipper 2017-12-20
img

Individually, these six-to-eight pound fish are noisy, but when packed together along a 16-mile strip (27 km) of the Colorado River Delta, their collective roar is nothing short of astounding—shaking the hulls of passing ships and threatening the hearing of any aquatic animal who dares to swim close.

Their mating behavior can be tied to tidal and lunar cycles, making them particularly vulnerable to fishermen, who can time the fish’s arrival to the minute.

What’s more, the audible cacophony produced by the male corvina leads the fishers to their exact location.

During the spawning season, a single net can catch up to two tons of corvina within a matter of minutes, and an entire fishing fleet can harvest up to 5,900 tons, or 2 million corvina, in just 20 days.

To learn more about these remarkable fish and the sounds they make, Brad Erisman from the University of Texas and Timothy Rowell from the University of California-San Diego set up camp along the Colorado River in 2014, conducting acoustic surveys of the fish during peak periods in March and April.

The highest measurement was 190 decibels (dB) using a peak-to-peak measurement, and the peak RMS (root mean square) was 177 decibels.

Jose Hilton 2019-01-21
img

Scientists from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute have discovered two species of fish that can thrive in waters that are nearly devoid of oxygen.

The two fish species are catsharks and cusk eels.

The researchers found high abundances of fish living in deep Gulf of California waters with almost no dissolved oxygen.

These fish are described as low-oxygen extremophiles.

The region of the gulf they live in is over 1,000 meters or 3,280-feet deep, and in many places, the environment has very little oxygen.

These regions have less than 3% of the oxygen concentration found at the ocean’s surface.

Bill Brown 2017-05-19
img

p Vaquitas are cartoonish-looking porpoises that swim around, bothering literally no one.

These little guys, which only weigh about 120 pounds, are found in just one region in the world — the Northern Gulf of California.

Their nickname — the “panda” porpoise — comes from the dark rings around their eyes, similar to that of the much-beloved bear.

Sadly, over the years, vaquita numbers have plummeted dramatically due to unscrupulous fishing practices and as a result, there are less than 30 left in the wild—according to the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), unless urgent action is taken, the porpoises could be extinct by next July.

“The vaquita lives only in the northern part of this World Heritage site‒an area affected by illegal and unsustainable fishing practices and wildlife trafficking of the critically endangered totoaba fish, together with urbanisation and increased pollution,” the WWF said in a recently released report on vaquita welfare.

“Failure to act will result in the imminent extinction of the vaquita.”

Walter Winkel 2019-05-21
img

“It is absolutely gillnets,” said Cynthia Smith, Executive Director for America's National Marine Mammal Foundation (NMMF).

Gillnets are coarse nylon fishing nets popular in artisanal fisheries and used across the Gulf of California.

On top of that, illegal fishing of the critically endangered totoaba fish has taken place since the late 1980s.

The totoaba’s fish bladder, or “maw,” is in high demand in China and in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) markets around the world, where it can fetch more money than gold or cocaine.

Like many species around the world, the porpoise was getting caught in the crosshairs of wildlife crime.

Andrea Crosta is a crime intelligence expert and the Executive Director of the Elephant Action League (EAL), an organisation with a mission of protecting wildlife and the environment through intelligence and investigative operations.

John Ruybal 2019-04-04
img

Scientists have discovered a strange and mesmerizingly beautiful space thousands of feet below the ocean's surface.

The otherworldly ecosystem features 75-foot towers containing volcanic flanges that create the illusion of looking at a mirror when one observes the super-hot hydrothermal fluids beneath them.

The gorgeous visuals provide a rare window into a world that looks like something cooked up by James Cameron for the "Avatar" sequels.

Scientists aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute's research vessel Falkor made the discovery during an expedition to study hydrothermal and gas plumes more than 6,500 feet below the surface of the ocean in the Gulf of California.

RUSSIAN ROCKET EN ROUTE TO INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION TO DELIVER SUPPLIES TO ASTRONAUTS

"We discovered remarkable towers where every surface was occupied by some type of life," Mandy Joyce, a marine scientist from the University of Georgia, said in a statement.

Alan Krieg 2019-04-08
img

In the Gulf of California, Mexico, a team of researchers dove deep and found a series of venting mineral towers.

These towers were up to 10 meters across, 23 meters tall, and were “teeming with biodiversity and potentially novel fauna.” And they were colorful – so very colorful.

The most shocking part about this situation is the fact that these same spots were visited a decade ago and none of what we see here was there – it’s all new!

Large amounts of new hydrothermal venting popped up in the past 10 years, providing for an ever-changing underwater landscape in the area.

The team aimed to “identify and quantify habitat-specific microbial populations,” and BOY did they find their fill.

“This is an amazing natural laboratory to document incredible organisms and better understand how they survive in extremely challenging environments,” said Dr. Mandy Joye (University of Georgia).

David Shiner 2019-04-09
img

Deep in the Gulf of California, scientists have discovered a fantastical expanse of hydrothermal vents, full of crystallized gases, glimmering pools of piping-hot fluids and rainbow-hued life-forms.

A decade ago, scientists visiting this spot saw nothing unusual; this psychedelic seascape seems to have built up around an increase in hydrothermal venting — spots in the seafloor where mineral-laden and superhot water jets out — in the last 10 years.

"Astonishing is not strong enough of a word," said Mandy Joye, a marine biologist at the University of Georgia, who led the team that discovered the vents.

"We saw a lot of really interesting topography, which made me scratch my head," Joye said.

Nearly 6,000 feet (1,800 m) below the surface, they saw the vents that were carpeted with microbes, marine worms and species they didn't recognize.

Most likely, Joye said, new vents have opened since then, or the rate of hydrothermal fluid flow has increased.

Christopher Driskell 2019-08-02
img

There are now less than 19 individual vaquita porpoises left in the wild, according to an alarming new survey.

If fishing nets continue to be used illegally off the coast of Mexico, vaquita porpoises (Phocoena sinus) will likely become extinct within a year, according to new research published in Royal Society Open Science.

As the new research shows, and despite measures taken by the Mexican government in 2015 to crack down on the use of illegal nets, the population of vaquita porpoises continues to decline.

On average, females measure around 140 centimeters (55 inches) in length, while males are slightly shorter at 135 centimeters (53 inches) long.

Vaquitas, which translates to “small cow” in Spanish, have a gray or white complexion, a tall dorsal fin, dark eye rings, and long flippers.

To that end, they recorded the echolocating clicks made by vaquitas across a large grid of acoustic sensors spread across the water.