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Charles Pete 2021-01-24
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The freeze will take effect early Tuesday morning and last until January 31. Domestic airlines will also face new restrictions, Haaretz reported.
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William Labounty 2017-10-24

Facebook has apologized after a Palestinian man was arrested by Israeli police for a post saying “good morning” that its automatic-translation service erroneously translated as “attack them” in Hebrew and “hurt them” in English, reports Israeli newspaper Haaretz.

The man is a construction worker near Jerusalem, reports The Guardian.

He posted a photo of himself last week leaning against a bulldozer with the caption “يصبحهم”, or “yusbihuhum,” which translates as “good morning.”

Police arrested the man after they were notified of the post and were suspicious he was planning a vehicle attack using the bulldozer.

He was released hours later after police realized the mistake.

Haaretz reports that before his arrest, no Arabic-speaking officer had read the man’s Facebook post.

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0
William Labounty 2016-09-12
img

The attacks sought to knock sites offline by overwhelming them with data

Two Israeli teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of running a service that allowed paying customers to attack websites.

The vDos service the pair are suspected to have run bombarded target sites with data, seeking to knock them offline.

The arrests came soon after cybersecurity expert Brian Krebs posted a lengthy article claiming to expose the controllers of the vDos service.

But an Israeli police spokesman told Israeli newspaper Haaretz the arrests had come after a tip-off from the FBI.

Haaretz and The Marker reported that Itay Huri and Yarden Bidani, both 18, had been put under house arrest for 10 days.

collect
0
Marc Leonard 2017-11-27
img

Uber has been banned in Israel, according to reports from local news sites Haaretz and The Jerusalem Post.

A Tel Aviv judge reportedly said on Monday that the company does not have the appropriate insurance in place to operate in Israel.

Uber will be banned in Israel from 10 a.m. on Tuesday, according to Haaretz.

The court case was brought about by Israel's Transportation Ministry which argues that Uber breaks the law by letting drivers charge passengers without a licence.

Tens of thousands of people have reportedly used Uber in Israel, according to Uber's Israel chief, Yoni Greifman.

Uber has several other legal and regulatory battles going on around the world.

collect
0
Milagros Lester 2018-11-30
img

Experts in Israel have identified a ring that may have belonged to Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who oversaw the trial and crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

Haaretz reports that the bronze ring was discovered 50 years ago during excavations at the Herodion fortress in the Judean desert.

Initially uncovered in a dig led by Professor Gideon Foerster of Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the ring was handed over to a team researchers currently working Herodion, led by Roi Porat, also of Hebrew University.

HOW JESUS DIED: ANCIENT CRUCIFIXION VICTIM OFFERS NEW CLUES

A wine vessel and the Greek inscription “Pilatus” can be clearly seen on the ring, according to Haaretz.

As prefect of the Roman province of Judea, it is quite possible that the ring belonged to the infamous Pontius Pilate.

collect
0
Ralph Knotts 2017-03-13
img

The Israeli autonomous-driving company Mobileye soared in pre-market trading on Monday on a report that Intel had bought it for $15 billion.Mobileye's stock was up 30% around 6:13 a.m.

ET after the Israeli newspaper Haaretz published a story, citing sources, on what would be the biggest acquisition in Israeli high-tech in history.The Jerusalem-based company develops vision-based driver-assistance tools to provide warnings before collisions.Tesla began incorporating its technology into Model S cars in 2015.In January, Mobileye announced it was developing a test fleet of autonomous cars together with BMW and Intel.Mobileye was cofounded in 1999 by Amnon Shashua, an academic, and Ziv Aviram, who is currently CEO.

Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley took it public in 2014.Read the full Haaretz report here.NOW WATCH: A $2.5 trillion asset manager just put a statue of a defiant girl in front of the Wall Street bullLoading video...

collect
0
John Murphy 2019-09-09
img

Archaeologists in Israel may have discovered the Biblical town of Emmaus, which is linked to Jesus’ resurrection and the Ark of the Covenant.

Haaretz reports that archaeologists have uncovered the remains of a 2,200-year-old fortification at Kiriath-Jearim, a hill on the outskirts of Abu Ghosh, a village near Jerusalem.

The fortification dates back to the Hellenistic period when ancient Greek influence in the region was strong.

Tel Aviv University Professor Israel Finkelstein told Haaretz that the walls were repaired during the later period of Roman rule in the first century A.D.

In Luke 24:13-35 Emmaus is described as being about 7 miles from Jerusalem.

This corresponds with the distance between Kiriath-Jearim, Abu Ghosh and Jerusalem.

collect
0
Christopher Driskell 2017-10-25
img

A Palestinian construction worker was arrested by Israeli police after Facebook incorrectly translated the text of one of his posts.

Haaretz reports that the man uploaded a picture from his job at a construction site with the text “good morning” in Arabic.

When officers used Facebook’s automatic translation service to read the post, the text was mistranslated as “attack them” in Hebrew and “hurt them” in English.

According to Haaretz, Arabic speakers said the “English transliteration used by Facebook is not an actual word in Arabic but could look like the verb ‘to hurt’—even though any Arabic speaker could clearly see the transliteration did not match the translation.” No Arabic-speaking officers reportedly saw the post prior to the man’s arrest.

Facebook originally used Microsoft’s translation AI, but began using a proprietary translation software in 2016.

When contacted by Gizmodo, Necip Fazil Ayan, an engineering manager in Facebook’s language technologies group, provided the following statement:

collect
0
Isiah Jone 2017-10-17
img

The Israeli government is cancelling its plans to set up a database of all Jewish university students in the United States (roughly 350,000 people) to market them Israeli content, Haaretz reported.

Using targeted advertising techniques, the planned purpose of the database was to galvanise interest among Jewish American students in Israel, Judaism, and Israeli activities.

As the outlet reported, Israel’s Ministry of Diaspora Affairs was working on the project in conjunction with Mosaic United, a state-affiliated fundraising organisation that finances programmes connecting Jewish university students, businesses leaders and philanthropists worldwide with Israel.

The Israeli government provides one-third of the funding for Mosaic United’s projects, with the remainder coming from private donors and partnered organisations.

Before the database was scrapped, Mosaic United invited bids on the project from Israeli technology companies on its site.

The database of “some 350,000 students” would have included the university they attended, local Israeli/Jewish events in the area, and “daily structural mapping of Jewish/Israeli online content,” Haaretz quoted the invitation for bids (or “tender”) as saying.

collect
0
Joseph Cormier 2017-10-25
img

A Palestinian construction worker was arrested by Israeli police after Facebook incorrectly translated the text of one of his posts.

Haaretz reports that the man uploaded a picture from his job at a construction site with the text “good morning” in Arabic.

When officers used Facebook’s automatic translation service to read the post, the text was mistranslated as “attack them” in Hebrew and “hurt them” in English.

According to Haaretz, Arabic speakers said the “English transliteration used by Facebook is not an actual word in Arabic but could look like the verb ‘to hurt’—even though any Arabic speaker could clearly see the transliteration did not match the translation.” No Arabic-speaking officers reportedly saw the post prior to the man’s arrest.

Facebook originally used Microsoft’s translation AI, but began using a proprietary translation software in 2016.

When contacted by Gizmodo, Necip Fazil Ayan, an engineering manager in Facebook’s language technologies group, provided the following statement:

collect
0
Charles Pete 2018-11-29
img

The mask, which dates back to the Neolithic period, was found by a settler walking in the hills south of Hebron, on the West Bank, according to Haaretz.

In a statement released Wednesday, the Israel Antiquities Authority confirmed that the mask was discovered several months ago.

At the start of 2018, the IAA’s Antiques Theft Prevention Unit received information that led to the mask’s recovery.

'JESUS' FACE' UNCOVERED AT ANCIENT CHURCH IN THE ISRAELI DESERT

“Discovering a mask made of stone, at such a high level of finish, is very exciting,” said Ronit Lupu of the IAA Antiquities Theft Prevention Unit, in the statement.

“The stone has been completely smoothed over and the features are perfect and symmetrical, even delineating cheekbones.

collect
0
John Feeney 2017-09-25
img

Gets its mitts on juicy GDPR-friendly data security tech

Gigya, which is headquartered in Mountain View but started life in Israel, offers companies a platform to manage their customers' details.

The platform, which has about 1.3 billion customer identities, collects usage data, but also records customers' opt-in and consent settings.

These go into the firm's registration-as-a-service, which manages compliance requirements, including the incoming General Data Protection Regulation.

It's this capability that's likely to be the driver for SAP's acquisition, which Haaretz reported was for $350m, as it allows the German biz to quickly position itself in the growing GDPR software market.

SAP will also get access to Gigya's 700 or so customers, which include big brands like Asos, Bose and Forbes.

collect
0
Donald Ellison 2017-06-20
img

Federal police in Argentina recently discovered a time capsule of evil, hidden inside a house near Buenos Aires.

Roughly 75 Nazi artefacts, including everything from a large knife to Nazi medical devices to a photo negative of Adolph Hitler, were uncovered in a secret room.

Police are investigating when and how the items entered the South American country.

As Haaretz reports, agents from Interpol raided the home of the unnamed owner of the Nazi artefacts on June 8th.

The investigators have reached out to Holocaust experts to learn more about where the Nazi pieces may have come from, but members of the Jewish community in Argentina believe that they must have been brought to the country by Nazi officials following World War II.

Members of the federal police show a bust relief portrait of Adolf Hitler at the Interpol headquarters in Buenos Aires, Argentina (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

collect
0
Marie Haines 2016-08-24
img

A hand grenade that is hundreds of years old which was found in the sea.

The metal artifacts, some of which are more than 3,500 years old, were found over a period of years by the late Marcel Mazliah, a worker at the Hadera power plant in northern Israel.

Mazliah s family recently presented the treasures to the Israel Antiquities Authority.

Experts, who were surprised by the haul, think that the objects probably fell overboard from a medieval metal merchant s ship.

Grenades were also used 12th and 13th century Ayyubid period and the Mamluk era, which ran from the 13th to the 16th century, experts say.

Haaretz reports that early grenades were often used to disperse burning flammable liquid.

collect
0
Edward Hudson 2017-10-24
img

Facebook has apologised after an error in its machine-translation service saw Israeli police arrest a Palestinian man for posting “good morning” on his social media profile.

The man, a construction worker in the West Bank settlement of Beitar Illit, near Jerusalem, posted a picture of himself leaning against a bulldozer with the caption “يصبحهم”, or “yusbihuhum”, which translates as “good morning”.

But Facebook’s artificial intelligence-powered translation service, which it built after parting ways with Microsoft’s Bing translation in 2016, instead translated the word into “hurt them” in English or “attack them” in Hebrew.

Police officers arrested the man later that day, according to Israeli newspaper Haaretz, after they were notified of the post.

They questioned him for several hours, suspicious he was planning to use the pictured bulldozer in a vehicle attack, before realising their mistake.

At no point before his arrest did any Arabic-speaking officer read the actual post.

collect
0
Daniel Martin 2019-04-11
img

Likudpartiet, was in favour of the israeli elections, put large sums of money on the hidden cameras that were distributed to activists, who would monitor the polling stations in the areas where it mainly lives of the israeli arabs.

The over 1,200 hidden cameras aroused strong protests and was reported to the police by the country's electoral commission.

When almost all of the votes had been counted, the arab turnout to have been one of the lowest in the history of Israel - which is celebrated by the pr firm that was behind the kameratilltaget, reports the newspaper Haaretz.

"Thanks to that, we placed observers in every polling station, we managed to reduce the voter turnout to below 50 per cent, the lowest in many years," writes the pr firm Kaizler Inbar on Facebook.

Prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Likudpartiets leader, has confirmed it all and claim that the cameras ensures that the voting goes right.

collect
0
Charles Pete 2021-01-24
img
The freeze will take effect early Tuesday morning and last until January 31. Domestic airlines will also face new restrictions, Haaretz reported.
William Labounty 2016-09-12
img

The attacks sought to knock sites offline by overwhelming them with data

Two Israeli teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of running a service that allowed paying customers to attack websites.

The vDos service the pair are suspected to have run bombarded target sites with data, seeking to knock them offline.

The arrests came soon after cybersecurity expert Brian Krebs posted a lengthy article claiming to expose the controllers of the vDos service.

But an Israeli police spokesman told Israeli newspaper Haaretz the arrests had come after a tip-off from the FBI.

Haaretz and The Marker reported that Itay Huri and Yarden Bidani, both 18, had been put under house arrest for 10 days.

Milagros Lester 2018-11-30
img

Experts in Israel have identified a ring that may have belonged to Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who oversaw the trial and crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

Haaretz reports that the bronze ring was discovered 50 years ago during excavations at the Herodion fortress in the Judean desert.

Initially uncovered in a dig led by Professor Gideon Foerster of Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the ring was handed over to a team researchers currently working Herodion, led by Roi Porat, also of Hebrew University.

HOW JESUS DIED: ANCIENT CRUCIFIXION VICTIM OFFERS NEW CLUES

A wine vessel and the Greek inscription “Pilatus” can be clearly seen on the ring, according to Haaretz.

As prefect of the Roman province of Judea, it is quite possible that the ring belonged to the infamous Pontius Pilate.

John Murphy 2019-09-09
img

Archaeologists in Israel may have discovered the Biblical town of Emmaus, which is linked to Jesus’ resurrection and the Ark of the Covenant.

Haaretz reports that archaeologists have uncovered the remains of a 2,200-year-old fortification at Kiriath-Jearim, a hill on the outskirts of Abu Ghosh, a village near Jerusalem.

The fortification dates back to the Hellenistic period when ancient Greek influence in the region was strong.

Tel Aviv University Professor Israel Finkelstein told Haaretz that the walls were repaired during the later period of Roman rule in the first century A.D.

In Luke 24:13-35 Emmaus is described as being about 7 miles from Jerusalem.

This corresponds with the distance between Kiriath-Jearim, Abu Ghosh and Jerusalem.

Isiah Jone 2017-10-17
img

The Israeli government is cancelling its plans to set up a database of all Jewish university students in the United States (roughly 350,000 people) to market them Israeli content, Haaretz reported.

Using targeted advertising techniques, the planned purpose of the database was to galvanise interest among Jewish American students in Israel, Judaism, and Israeli activities.

As the outlet reported, Israel’s Ministry of Diaspora Affairs was working on the project in conjunction with Mosaic United, a state-affiliated fundraising organisation that finances programmes connecting Jewish university students, businesses leaders and philanthropists worldwide with Israel.

The Israeli government provides one-third of the funding for Mosaic United’s projects, with the remainder coming from private donors and partnered organisations.

Before the database was scrapped, Mosaic United invited bids on the project from Israeli technology companies on its site.

The database of “some 350,000 students” would have included the university they attended, local Israeli/Jewish events in the area, and “daily structural mapping of Jewish/Israeli online content,” Haaretz quoted the invitation for bids (or “tender”) as saying.

Charles Pete 2018-11-29
img

The mask, which dates back to the Neolithic period, was found by a settler walking in the hills south of Hebron, on the West Bank, according to Haaretz.

In a statement released Wednesday, the Israel Antiquities Authority confirmed that the mask was discovered several months ago.

At the start of 2018, the IAA’s Antiques Theft Prevention Unit received information that led to the mask’s recovery.

'JESUS' FACE' UNCOVERED AT ANCIENT CHURCH IN THE ISRAELI DESERT

“Discovering a mask made of stone, at such a high level of finish, is very exciting,” said Ronit Lupu of the IAA Antiquities Theft Prevention Unit, in the statement.

“The stone has been completely smoothed over and the features are perfect and symmetrical, even delineating cheekbones.

Donald Ellison 2017-06-20
img

Federal police in Argentina recently discovered a time capsule of evil, hidden inside a house near Buenos Aires.

Roughly 75 Nazi artefacts, including everything from a large knife to Nazi medical devices to a photo negative of Adolph Hitler, were uncovered in a secret room.

Police are investigating when and how the items entered the South American country.

As Haaretz reports, agents from Interpol raided the home of the unnamed owner of the Nazi artefacts on June 8th.

The investigators have reached out to Holocaust experts to learn more about where the Nazi pieces may have come from, but members of the Jewish community in Argentina believe that they must have been brought to the country by Nazi officials following World War II.

Members of the federal police show a bust relief portrait of Adolf Hitler at the Interpol headquarters in Buenos Aires, Argentina (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Edward Hudson 2017-10-24
img

Facebook has apologised after an error in its machine-translation service saw Israeli police arrest a Palestinian man for posting “good morning” on his social media profile.

The man, a construction worker in the West Bank settlement of Beitar Illit, near Jerusalem, posted a picture of himself leaning against a bulldozer with the caption “يصبحهم”, or “yusbihuhum”, which translates as “good morning”.

But Facebook’s artificial intelligence-powered translation service, which it built after parting ways with Microsoft’s Bing translation in 2016, instead translated the word into “hurt them” in English or “attack them” in Hebrew.

Police officers arrested the man later that day, according to Israeli newspaper Haaretz, after they were notified of the post.

They questioned him for several hours, suspicious he was planning to use the pictured bulldozer in a vehicle attack, before realising their mistake.

At no point before his arrest did any Arabic-speaking officer read the actual post.

William Labounty 2017-10-24

Facebook has apologized after a Palestinian man was arrested by Israeli police for a post saying “good morning” that its automatic-translation service erroneously translated as “attack them” in Hebrew and “hurt them” in English, reports Israeli newspaper Haaretz.

The man is a construction worker near Jerusalem, reports The Guardian.

He posted a photo of himself last week leaning against a bulldozer with the caption “يصبحهم”, or “yusbihuhum,” which translates as “good morning.”

Police arrested the man after they were notified of the post and were suspicious he was planning a vehicle attack using the bulldozer.

He was released hours later after police realized the mistake.

Haaretz reports that before his arrest, no Arabic-speaking officer had read the man’s Facebook post.

Marc Leonard 2017-11-27
img

Uber has been banned in Israel, according to reports from local news sites Haaretz and The Jerusalem Post.

A Tel Aviv judge reportedly said on Monday that the company does not have the appropriate insurance in place to operate in Israel.

Uber will be banned in Israel from 10 a.m. on Tuesday, according to Haaretz.

The court case was brought about by Israel's Transportation Ministry which argues that Uber breaks the law by letting drivers charge passengers without a licence.

Tens of thousands of people have reportedly used Uber in Israel, according to Uber's Israel chief, Yoni Greifman.

Uber has several other legal and regulatory battles going on around the world.

Ralph Knotts 2017-03-13
img

The Israeli autonomous-driving company Mobileye soared in pre-market trading on Monday on a report that Intel had bought it for $15 billion.Mobileye's stock was up 30% around 6:13 a.m.

ET after the Israeli newspaper Haaretz published a story, citing sources, on what would be the biggest acquisition in Israeli high-tech in history.The Jerusalem-based company develops vision-based driver-assistance tools to provide warnings before collisions.Tesla began incorporating its technology into Model S cars in 2015.In January, Mobileye announced it was developing a test fleet of autonomous cars together with BMW and Intel.Mobileye was cofounded in 1999 by Amnon Shashua, an academic, and Ziv Aviram, who is currently CEO.

Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley took it public in 2014.Read the full Haaretz report here.NOW WATCH: A $2.5 trillion asset manager just put a statue of a defiant girl in front of the Wall Street bullLoading video...

Christopher Driskell 2017-10-25
img

A Palestinian construction worker was arrested by Israeli police after Facebook incorrectly translated the text of one of his posts.

Haaretz reports that the man uploaded a picture from his job at a construction site with the text “good morning” in Arabic.

When officers used Facebook’s automatic translation service to read the post, the text was mistranslated as “attack them” in Hebrew and “hurt them” in English.

According to Haaretz, Arabic speakers said the “English transliteration used by Facebook is not an actual word in Arabic but could look like the verb ‘to hurt’—even though any Arabic speaker could clearly see the transliteration did not match the translation.” No Arabic-speaking officers reportedly saw the post prior to the man’s arrest.

Facebook originally used Microsoft’s translation AI, but began using a proprietary translation software in 2016.

When contacted by Gizmodo, Necip Fazil Ayan, an engineering manager in Facebook’s language technologies group, provided the following statement:

Joseph Cormier 2017-10-25
img

A Palestinian construction worker was arrested by Israeli police after Facebook incorrectly translated the text of one of his posts.

Haaretz reports that the man uploaded a picture from his job at a construction site with the text “good morning” in Arabic.

When officers used Facebook’s automatic translation service to read the post, the text was mistranslated as “attack them” in Hebrew and “hurt them” in English.

According to Haaretz, Arabic speakers said the “English transliteration used by Facebook is not an actual word in Arabic but could look like the verb ‘to hurt’—even though any Arabic speaker could clearly see the transliteration did not match the translation.” No Arabic-speaking officers reportedly saw the post prior to the man’s arrest.

Facebook originally used Microsoft’s translation AI, but began using a proprietary translation software in 2016.

When contacted by Gizmodo, Necip Fazil Ayan, an engineering manager in Facebook’s language technologies group, provided the following statement:

John Feeney 2017-09-25
img

Gets its mitts on juicy GDPR-friendly data security tech

Gigya, which is headquartered in Mountain View but started life in Israel, offers companies a platform to manage their customers' details.

The platform, which has about 1.3 billion customer identities, collects usage data, but also records customers' opt-in and consent settings.

These go into the firm's registration-as-a-service, which manages compliance requirements, including the incoming General Data Protection Regulation.

It's this capability that's likely to be the driver for SAP's acquisition, which Haaretz reported was for $350m, as it allows the German biz to quickly position itself in the growing GDPR software market.

SAP will also get access to Gigya's 700 or so customers, which include big brands like Asos, Bose and Forbes.

Marie Haines 2016-08-24
img

A hand grenade that is hundreds of years old which was found in the sea.

The metal artifacts, some of which are more than 3,500 years old, were found over a period of years by the late Marcel Mazliah, a worker at the Hadera power plant in northern Israel.

Mazliah s family recently presented the treasures to the Israel Antiquities Authority.

Experts, who were surprised by the haul, think that the objects probably fell overboard from a medieval metal merchant s ship.

Grenades were also used 12th and 13th century Ayyubid period and the Mamluk era, which ran from the 13th to the 16th century, experts say.

Haaretz reports that early grenades were often used to disperse burning flammable liquid.

Daniel Martin 2019-04-11
img

Likudpartiet, was in favour of the israeli elections, put large sums of money on the hidden cameras that were distributed to activists, who would monitor the polling stations in the areas where it mainly lives of the israeli arabs.

The over 1,200 hidden cameras aroused strong protests and was reported to the police by the country's electoral commission.

When almost all of the votes had been counted, the arab turnout to have been one of the lowest in the history of Israel - which is celebrated by the pr firm that was behind the kameratilltaget, reports the newspaper Haaretz.

"Thanks to that, we placed observers in every polling station, we managed to reduce the voter turnout to below 50 per cent, the lowest in many years," writes the pr firm Kaizler Inbar on Facebook.

Prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Likudpartiets leader, has confirmed it all and claim that the cameras ensures that the voting goes right.