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John Dumlao 2021-04-21
(University of Granada) An international team of scientists, led by the University of Granada (UGR), has identified for the first time a series of 267 genes linked to creativity that differentiate Homo sapiens from Homo neanderthalensis (Neanderthals) and the chimpanzee. Their study indicates that these genes acted as a "secret weapon" that enabled Homo sapiens to avoid extinction
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Jeanne Hoffman 2017-09-03
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Despite many recent discoveries that show Neanderthals were technologically and socially sophisticated, there's still a popular idea that these heavy-browed, pale-skinned early humans were mentally inferior to modern Homo sapiens.

A fascinating new study reveals that Neanderthals were distilling tar for tool-making 200 thousand years ago—long before evidence of tar-making among Homo sapiens.

One of humanity's earliest technological breakthroughs was learning to distill tar from tree bark.

It was key to making compound tools with two or more parts; adhesives could keep a stone blade nicely fitted into a wooden handle for use as a hoe, an axe, or even a spear.

Scientists have discovered ancient beads of tar in Italy, Germany, and several other European sites dating back as much as 200 thousand years, which is about 150 thousand years before modern Homo sapiens arrived in Western Europe.

The question that Leiden University archaeologist Paul Kozowyk and his colleagues wanted to answer was how sophisticated the Neanderthals had to be to do it.

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0
Kiara Brumbaugh 2020-01-15

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 progress hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

collect
0
Jolliff Tocco 2020-02-02

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 growth hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

collect
0
Luke Hall 2018-04-26
img

Ever since a paleontologist discovered the first Homo neanderthalensis skeleton in 1829, scientists have tried to piece together why Homo sapiens eventually thrived, while Neanderthals disappeared around 40,000 years ago.

By comparing their prehistoric skulls to ours, scientists learned that Neanderthal brains were slightly larger than ours, both at birth and at full size, and that they may have lived longer than our ancestors.

So why didn’t this evolutionary advantage help Neanderthals dominate humanity?

Using biomedical computer imaging software and Neanderthal skull fossils, three Japanese researchers have now mapped out how specific portions of Neanderthal brains compared to ancient humans—and how specialized portions of Homo sapiens’ brains may have contributed to their survival over Neanderthals.

And the researchers theorize that humans’ larger cerebellums gave them “higher cognitive and social functions including executive functions, language processing and episodic and working memory capacity.”

Because of their allegedly inferior communication skills and long-term memory, Neanderthals may have had more trouble adapting to climate change events like ice ages than Homo sapiens.

collect
0
Cassi Shane 2020-01-12

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 development hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

collect
0
Mcquiston Livers 2020-01-12

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 development hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

collect
0
Henry Lawrence 2018-02-01
img

That’s all sorts of incredible, because Homo sapiens like you and me didn’t leave Africa until about 175,000 years ago.

Also known as the Middle Stone Age, this stage of hominid development is characterised by the emergence of sophisticated stone tools, including fancy new blades, distinctive flaking and pointing methods, and a preference for smaller tools.

When the first hominids left Africa some 1.7 million years ago, they were armed with a killer app known to archaeologists as the Acheulian hand axe, and it’s by this tool that the Acheulian culture is known.

But like any technology, it eventually became obsolete as new, better tools become popular.

These early humans had a lot in common with Homo sapiens, like walking upright and having the ability to forge tools, but they differed in some subtle ways, such as differently sized skulls, prominent brow ridges, and shorter statures (except the Neanderthals, which, like our own species, had an average height of 5'3”).

All of these human species eventually went extinct, but some interbred with anatomically modern humans, or Homo sapiens.

collect
0
Hession Neal 2020-01-14

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 progress hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

collect
0
Sanjuana Schneiderman 2020-01-14

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 progress hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

collect
0
Earwood Brooke 2020-02-02

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 development hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

collect
0
Dwayne Alcorn 2019-07-10
img

Modern humans emerged about 300,000 years ago in Africa.

But anthropologists have found a 210,000-year-old Homo sapien skull in a Greek cave: the oldest modern human ever found in Eurasia.

The discovery indicates that some humans left Africa far earlier than researchers previously thought and spread far wider.

A study published today in the journal Nature revealed that the skull, which was originally discovered in Greece in the 1970s, belonged to a member of an early population of Homo sapiens and is about 210,000 years old.

It predates what researchers previously considered to be the earliest evidence of Homo sapiens in Europe by more than 160,000 years.

A tale of 2 skulls

collect
0
Scott Morell 2016-07-04
img

Homo sapiens evolved about 200,000 to 150,000 years ago in Africa, but our story as a species stretches back much further than that with early human ancestors.

And the evolution of Homo sapiens is itself a tangled tale, full of unanswered questions and gothic family melodrama.

Here are a few facts you may not know about the human evolutionary story.

And they had been wandering around Eurasia for hundreds of thousands of years.

For humans, this number hovers around 15,000 individuals, which is pretty insane when you consider our actual population size is seven billion.

There are a lot of theories about why this might be, ranging from an apocalyptic disaster caused by the eruption of the Toba volcano, to something more mundane like interbreeding among small populations.

collect
0
Donny Stiteler 2016-07-04
img

Homo sapiens evolved about 200,000 to 150,000 years ago in Africa, but our story as a species stretches back much further than that with early human ancestors.

And the evolution of Homo sapiens is itself a tangled tale, full of unanswered questions and gothic family melodrama.

Here are a few facts you may not know about the human evolutionary story.

And they had been wandering around Eurasia for hundreds of thousands of years.

For humans, this number hovers around 15,000 individuals, which is pretty insane when you consider our actual population size is seven billion.

There are a lot of theories about why this might be, ranging from an apocalyptic disaster caused by the eruption of the Toba volcano, to something more mundane like interbreeding among small populations.

collect
0
William Ewing 2018-01-26
img

Archaeologists in Israel have uncovered the partial jawbone from what appears to be a modern human.

Dated to between 175,000 to 200,000 years old, the fossil is 50,000 years older than any other human fossil found in the region, suggesting humans left Africa far earlier than previously thought.

Archaeologists have been exploring these caves for decades, so the discovery of the odd bone or artefact isn’t particularly extraordinary; ancient humans, including now-extinct species and anatomically modern Homo sapiens, populated these caves repeatedly during both the Upper and Lower Palaeolithic, leaving signs of their occupancy behind.

The recent discovery of a partial jawbone with several teeth still intact didn’t seem like a huge deal at first, but when multiple dating techniques put its age at between 175,000 to 200,000 years old, the archaeologists who found the fossil realised they had stumbled upon something special.

“It provides the clearest evidence yet that our ancestors first migrated out of Africa much earlier than we previously believed.

Our species was late to the show—but Homo sapiens eventually prevailed, going on to settle virtually every corner of the planet.

collect
0
Ramon Delo 2017-10-05

Hidden in a cave in northern Croatia, a fragment of bone from a woman that lived 52,000 years has revealed its secrets, suggesting that we’re even closer to our evolutionary ancestors than we thought.

Thanks to this analysis of the ancient fragment, we now know that for modern humans outside of Africa, as much as 2.6 per cent of our genome is made up of Neanderthal DNA.

This suggests that Neanderthals may have mated with our own species – Homo Sapiens – as early as 130,000 years ago.

This genetic mixing left a handful of genes that are still active in most humans today – including those that influence our blood cholesterol and vitamin D levels, our fat accumulation and how we respond to antipsychotic drugs.

This new study highlights how little really separates us from our extinct cousins, says Simon Underdown at Oxford Brookes University in the UK.

“I think that it might have been bad luck – we could be having this conversation as Neanderthals and thinking about how lucky those Homo sapiens were to get wiped out.”

collect
0
John Dumlao 2021-04-21
(University of Granada) An international team of scientists, led by the University of Granada (UGR), has identified for the first time a series of 267 genes linked to creativity that differentiate Homo sapiens from Homo neanderthalensis (Neanderthals) and the chimpanzee. Their study indicates that these genes acted as a "secret weapon" that enabled Homo sapiens to avoid extinction
Kiara Brumbaugh 2020-01-15

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 progress hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

Luke Hall 2018-04-26
img

Ever since a paleontologist discovered the first Homo neanderthalensis skeleton in 1829, scientists have tried to piece together why Homo sapiens eventually thrived, while Neanderthals disappeared around 40,000 years ago.

By comparing their prehistoric skulls to ours, scientists learned that Neanderthal brains were slightly larger than ours, both at birth and at full size, and that they may have lived longer than our ancestors.

So why didn’t this evolutionary advantage help Neanderthals dominate humanity?

Using biomedical computer imaging software and Neanderthal skull fossils, three Japanese researchers have now mapped out how specific portions of Neanderthal brains compared to ancient humans—and how specialized portions of Homo sapiens’ brains may have contributed to their survival over Neanderthals.

And the researchers theorize that humans’ larger cerebellums gave them “higher cognitive and social functions including executive functions, language processing and episodic and working memory capacity.”

Because of their allegedly inferior communication skills and long-term memory, Neanderthals may have had more trouble adapting to climate change events like ice ages than Homo sapiens.

Mcquiston Livers 2020-01-12

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 development hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

Hession Neal 2020-01-14

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 progress hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

Earwood Brooke 2020-02-02

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 development hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

Scott Morell 2016-07-04
img

Homo sapiens evolved about 200,000 to 150,000 years ago in Africa, but our story as a species stretches back much further than that with early human ancestors.

And the evolution of Homo sapiens is itself a tangled tale, full of unanswered questions and gothic family melodrama.

Here are a few facts you may not know about the human evolutionary story.

And they had been wandering around Eurasia for hundreds of thousands of years.

For humans, this number hovers around 15,000 individuals, which is pretty insane when you consider our actual population size is seven billion.

There are a lot of theories about why this might be, ranging from an apocalyptic disaster caused by the eruption of the Toba volcano, to something more mundane like interbreeding among small populations.

William Ewing 2018-01-26
img

Archaeologists in Israel have uncovered the partial jawbone from what appears to be a modern human.

Dated to between 175,000 to 200,000 years old, the fossil is 50,000 years older than any other human fossil found in the region, suggesting humans left Africa far earlier than previously thought.

Archaeologists have been exploring these caves for decades, so the discovery of the odd bone or artefact isn’t particularly extraordinary; ancient humans, including now-extinct species and anatomically modern Homo sapiens, populated these caves repeatedly during both the Upper and Lower Palaeolithic, leaving signs of their occupancy behind.

The recent discovery of a partial jawbone with several teeth still intact didn’t seem like a huge deal at first, but when multiple dating techniques put its age at between 175,000 to 200,000 years old, the archaeologists who found the fossil realised they had stumbled upon something special.

“It provides the clearest evidence yet that our ancestors first migrated out of Africa much earlier than we previously believed.

Our species was late to the show—but Homo sapiens eventually prevailed, going on to settle virtually every corner of the planet.

Jeanne Hoffman 2017-09-03
img

Despite many recent discoveries that show Neanderthals were technologically and socially sophisticated, there's still a popular idea that these heavy-browed, pale-skinned early humans were mentally inferior to modern Homo sapiens.

A fascinating new study reveals that Neanderthals were distilling tar for tool-making 200 thousand years ago—long before evidence of tar-making among Homo sapiens.

One of humanity's earliest technological breakthroughs was learning to distill tar from tree bark.

It was key to making compound tools with two or more parts; adhesives could keep a stone blade nicely fitted into a wooden handle for use as a hoe, an axe, or even a spear.

Scientists have discovered ancient beads of tar in Italy, Germany, and several other European sites dating back as much as 200 thousand years, which is about 150 thousand years before modern Homo sapiens arrived in Western Europe.

The question that Leiden University archaeologist Paul Kozowyk and his colleagues wanted to answer was how sophisticated the Neanderthals had to be to do it.

Jolliff Tocco 2020-02-02

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 growth hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

Cassi Shane 2020-01-12

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 development hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

Henry Lawrence 2018-02-01
img

That’s all sorts of incredible, because Homo sapiens like you and me didn’t leave Africa until about 175,000 years ago.

Also known as the Middle Stone Age, this stage of hominid development is characterised by the emergence of sophisticated stone tools, including fancy new blades, distinctive flaking and pointing methods, and a preference for smaller tools.

When the first hominids left Africa some 1.7 million years ago, they were armed with a killer app known to archaeologists as the Acheulian hand axe, and it’s by this tool that the Acheulian culture is known.

But like any technology, it eventually became obsolete as new, better tools become popular.

These early humans had a lot in common with Homo sapiens, like walking upright and having the ability to forge tools, but they differed in some subtle ways, such as differently sized skulls, prominent brow ridges, and shorter statures (except the Neanderthals, which, like our own species, had an average height of 5'3”).

All of these human species eventually went extinct, but some interbred with anatomically modern humans, or Homo sapiens.

Sanjuana Schneiderman 2020-01-14

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.

"GH1 progress hormone 1 (Homo sapiens) - Gene".

Dwayne Alcorn 2019-07-10
img

Modern humans emerged about 300,000 years ago in Africa.

But anthropologists have found a 210,000-year-old Homo sapien skull in a Greek cave: the oldest modern human ever found in Eurasia.

The discovery indicates that some humans left Africa far earlier than researchers previously thought and spread far wider.

A study published today in the journal Nature revealed that the skull, which was originally discovered in Greece in the 1970s, belonged to a member of an early population of Homo sapiens and is about 210,000 years old.

It predates what researchers previously considered to be the earliest evidence of Homo sapiens in Europe by more than 160,000 years.

A tale of 2 skulls

Donny Stiteler 2016-07-04
img

Homo sapiens evolved about 200,000 to 150,000 years ago in Africa, but our story as a species stretches back much further than that with early human ancestors.

And the evolution of Homo sapiens is itself a tangled tale, full of unanswered questions and gothic family melodrama.

Here are a few facts you may not know about the human evolutionary story.

And they had been wandering around Eurasia for hundreds of thousands of years.

For humans, this number hovers around 15,000 individuals, which is pretty insane when you consider our actual population size is seven billion.

There are a lot of theories about why this might be, ranging from an apocalyptic disaster caused by the eruption of the Toba volcano, to something more mundane like interbreeding among small populations.

Ramon Delo 2017-10-05

Hidden in a cave in northern Croatia, a fragment of bone from a woman that lived 52,000 years has revealed its secrets, suggesting that we’re even closer to our evolutionary ancestors than we thought.

Thanks to this analysis of the ancient fragment, we now know that for modern humans outside of Africa, as much as 2.6 per cent of our genome is made up of Neanderthal DNA.

This suggests that Neanderthals may have mated with our own species – Homo Sapiens – as early as 130,000 years ago.

This genetic mixing left a handful of genes that are still active in most humans today – including those that influence our blood cholesterol and vitamin D levels, our fat accumulation and how we respond to antipsychotic drugs.

This new study highlights how little really separates us from our extinct cousins, says Simon Underdown at Oxford Brookes University in the UK.

“I think that it might have been bad luck – we could be having this conversation as Neanderthals and thinking about how lucky those Homo sapiens were to get wiped out.”