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Eric Vela 2019-05-30
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USC Viterbi's Information Sciences Institute (ISI) and the Intel Corporation's custom foundry organization today announced a collaboration to design, fabricate and package integrated circuits (ICs) through USC ISI's MOSIS unit.

The collaboration combines MOSIS's industry-leading integrated circuit manufacturing expertise with Intel's high-performance complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication and packaging technology.

It positions ISI and Intel Custom Foundry (ICF) to lead a new era of high-performance microelectronic manufacturing for the U.S. and global IC community.

"This is a significant event for the U.S. microelectronics community," said MOSIS co-director John Damoulakis.

"For the first time, the U.S. Government, R laboratories, companies, and academia will have access to Intel's advanced fabrication and packaging technologies economically through MOSIS."

MOSIS will offer multi-project-wafer runs for prototype integrated circuits, as well as dedicated runs for low-volume production.

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0
Issac Pierce 2019-01-28
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In a new study, USC researchers used machine learning to identify potential blood-based markers of Alzheimer's disease that could help with earlier diagnosis and lead to non-invasive ways of tracking the progress of the disease in patients.

The method was developed by USC computer science research assistant professor Greg Ver Steeg, a senior research lead at the USC Information Sciences Institute (ISI).

"This type of analysis is a novel way of discovering patterns of data to identify key diagnostic markers of disease," said team member Paul Thompson, the associate director of the USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute and professor in the Keck School of Medicine at USC.

The study, "Uncovering Biologically Coherent Peripheral Signatures of Health and Risk for Alzheimer's Disease in the Aging Brain," appeared in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, The study authors are from the USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute and the USC Information Sciences Institute.

While most Alzheimer's research to date has focused on known hypotheses, such as the build up of amyloid plaque and tau protein in the brain, both measures have proved tricky to measure in the bloodstream.

As a result, neuroscientists at USC wondered if there could be other "hidden" indicators of Alzheimer's--factors that could be detected with a routine blood test.

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0
Jim Evans 2021-06-17
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(University of Southern California) Anti-science attitudes and political ideology often go hand in hand, a new USC study finds, which means machine-analyzed data on platforms such as Twitter could offer clues as to where diseases like COVID-19 might spread.
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0
Cornelius Jones 2016-08-04
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What do a Welsh mezzo-soprano, a castle in the southwest of England, and a quantum computer in Los Angeles have in common?

Answer: they all teamed up recently for a musical performance that, according to its creator, represents the first computer music algorithm implemented on a quantum computer and the first live use of explicit quantum processes in an artistic piece.

Essentially the idea behind the performance was to give an astonishingly powerful quantum computer the opportunity to create music alongside a trained human classical singer.

In a 15-minute piece, broken into three different movements, mezzo-soprano Juliette Pochin had her voice sent across the internet to the quantum D-Wave machine at the University of South California s Information Sciences Institute in Marina Del Rey.

There are three subsystems involved , organizer Alexis Kirke, senior research fellow at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research at England s Plymouth University, told Digital Trends.

The laptop has a sound generator and communications server in the room with Juliette.

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0
Mike Estes 2021-07-14
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(University of Southern California) Before Millennials were over laugh-cry emojis, they were the most used emojis across the world, according to researchers at USC. The emoji was more popular than smiley faces say researchers who categorized millions of tweets across 30 countries and evaluated over 1700 emojis. Their study, "An empirical study of emoji usage on Twitter in linguistic and national contexts" was published in Online Social Networks and Media.
collect
0
Elizabeth Tinnin 2018-10-03
img

That's what computer scientist, Ewa Deelman, a research director at USC Information Sciences Institute (ISI), does.

As scientists work with myriad data points and pull in data from sensors all over the world, they need to work collaboratively utilize distributed resources to do complex scientific computations.

One can say she creates the complex cyber 'plumbing' so that data can flow freely between, and be crunched easily by researchers to advance scientific knowledge.

Deelman's systems have been leveraged by the Nobel Prize winning scientists who directly detected gravitational waves and by biologists and seismologists.

Her lab at USC ISI will now lead an effort to conduct a pilot study for a potential Cyberinfrastructure Center of Excellence.

Collaborating with computer scientists at the University of North Carolina's Renaissance Computing Institute, the University of Utah, Indiana University and the University of Notre Dame she will work on developing a cyberinfrastructure blueprint that could support scientists working on various high-profile National Science Foundation (NSF) programs.

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0
Bill Brown 2019-07-25
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From a confidence trick originating in the late 19th century, to sophisticated AI that can manipulate reality, recreating anyone's face or voice with almost pinpoint accuracy--spam has come a long way.

But what does the future of digital spam look like, what risks could it pose to our personal security and privacy, and what can we do to fight it?

In a new paper, which appeared in the August 2019 issue of Communications of the ACM (CACM), Emilio Ferrara, a USC research assistant professor in computer science and research team leader at USC Viterbi's Information Sciences Institute, tracks the evolution of digital spam and explores its complex, and often surprising, history.

"Scams not only exploit technical vulnerabilities; they exploit human ones."

Social media spam bots, which automatically produce content and interact with humans, have allowed spammers to scale their operations to an unprecedented level.

(Ferrara explores this in his 2016 CACM paper, The Rise of Social Bots).

collect
0
John Dumlao 2021-06-28
img
(University of Southern California) Researchers identified similar tweets by using natural language processing and neural networks to create clusters of alike tweets.They then compared tweets of New Yorkers versus Angelenos.
collect
0
James Mcgaugh 2018-04-09
img

A new study from Pew Research Center found that the majority of links to content from popular websites are being tweeted by bots.

“We hope that these findings will help illustrate the extent to which bots play a really prominent and pervasive role in posting links to prominent sites and help inform more broadly about automated accounts,” said Aaron Smith, Pew associate director.

“It is also worth highlighting that we are in no way implying that the posts that we looked at are illegitimate or problematic because they are automated.”

Emilio Ferrara, a research assistant professor for the Information Sciences Institute at the University of Southern California’s Viterbi School of Engineering, took a more critical view, saying, “The Pew study focuses on data from summer 2017.

Hopefully, the situation improved after Twitter’s recent attempts to mitigate the bot issue.

Our current research tries to determine if bots’ influence is unchanged, if bots evolved to escape new Twitter’s detection algorithms and if they are still heavily involved and an integral part of the Twitter conversation on topics like politics and social issues.”

collect
0
Joan Zappulla 2016-08-20
img

In July 2016, Lockheed Martin made improvements to the Quantum Computation Center housed at the USC Information Sciences Institute, increasing its qubit capacity to 1,098.

It s latest step in a process that s been going on for six and a half years, as the international security and aerospace company attempts to carve out a space in the fast-moving field of quantum computing.

In twenty years, this technology could have a huge impact on everything from academic research projects to online cybersecurity — but Lockheed Martin s usage demonstrates that some of the benefits of quantum computing could be even closer to fruition, even if a fully functional quantum computer is a ways off.

The first quantum system that Lockheed Martin bought from D-Wave was a 128-qubit processor codenamed Rainier, which otherwise went by the name D-Wave One.

It was later upgraded to the 512-qubit Vesuvius, which was itself recently upgraded to the 1,152-qubit D-Wave 2X.

Validation and verification was the inspiration for the program, but now it s expanding into other areas.

collect
0
Ruth Johnson 2017-10-24
img

USC's Information Sciences Institute will lead a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) initiative among universities to develop large-scale simulations of online behavior in complex social networks.

Emilio Ferrara, a USC ISI research leader and research assistant professor in the department of computer science at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, will lead the project with Kristina Lerman, a USC ISI research team leader and research associate professor in the department of computer science at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering.

Indiana University and the University of Notre Dame will collaborate with USC ISI on the four-year project, titled Cognitive Online Simulation of Information Network Environments (COSINE).

Social media use is rapidly increasing across the world, with tens of billions of messages and posts shared every day.

"This is important, as we are now seeing how the information we receive online can affect our offline behaviors, personal beliefs and opinions," adds Lerman.

Leveraging the existing capabilities of ISI's Cyber Defense Technology Experimental Research (DETER) Laboratory, COSINE researchers will create a virtual lab to study the factors that influence online social dynamics, including message content, variance in emotion and cognitive biases.

collect
0
John Bloodsaw 2020-09-29
img
(University of Southern California) The researchers at USC have made some discoveries about the network behind the Panama Papers, uncovering uniquely fragmented network behavior and transactions. This is vastly different from more traditional social or organizational networks, demonstrating why these systems of transactions and associations are so robust and difficult to infiltrate or take down
collect
0
Thomas Gibson 2016-11-08
img

Twitter bots are believed to be driving the political discourse on social media on behalf of both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, according to a new report released by a pair of University of Southern California professors just ahead of Election Day 2016.

We investigated how social bots, automatic accounts that populate the Twitter-sphere, are distorting the online discussion about the 2016 U.S. Presidential elections, Emilio Ferrara, who teamed up with fellow USC professor Alessandro Bessi on the study, wrote in a post.About 19 percent of the election-related posts on the microblogging network created between Sept. 16 and Oct. 21 were produced by robots rather than human beings, the USC study determined.

By leveraging state-of-the-art social bot-detection algorithms, we uncovered a large fraction of user population that may not be human, professors Ferrara and Bessi, both with the Information Sciences Institute at USC, stated in their research paper.

They account for a significant portion of generated content.

The professors conducting the study analyzed 20 million election-related tweets and discovered that robots created 3.8 million of those tweets.

Our findings suggest that the presence of social media bots can indeed negatively affect democratic political discussion rather than improving it, professors Ferrara and Bessi wrote in their paper titled, Social Bots Distort the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election Online Discussion.

collect
0
Wesley Reese 2019-08-07
img

To better serve families at risk for these conditions, scientists need a comprehensive and systematic understanding of how the faces of healthy children form and what goes wrong to cause common malformations, such as cleft lip and palate.

With this in mind, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) launched FaceBase, a central repository for craniofacial datasets and tools meant to advance craniofacial science by fostering cooperation and collaboration around the globe.

The project's principal investigators are Carl Kesselman, professor at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering Department of Computer Science and director of the Biomedical Data Center at USC's Information Sciences Institute, and Yang Chai, associate dean of research for the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC and director of the Center of Craniofacial and Molecular Biology.

"This NIDCR supported Craniofacial Development and Dysmorphology Data Management and Integration Hub will continue to develop towards a comprehensive resource for researchers around the globe and highlights the leadership provided by interdisciplinary researchers at USC to bring oral and craniofacial research to the next level of excellence."

The major goal of the FaceBase Consortium is to advance research by creating comprehensive datasets of craniofacial development and dysmorphologies, or birth defects, and to disseminate these datasets to the wider craniofacial research community.

Cleft lip and palate are amongst the most common of all birth defects.

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0
Wayne Konwinski 2017-09-22
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After an election year marked by heated exchanges and the distribution of fake news, Twitter bots earned a bad reputation--but not all bots are bad, suggests a new study co-authored by Emilio Ferrara, a USC Information Sciences Institute computer scientist and a research assistant professor at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering's Department of Computer Science.

In a large-scale experiment designed to analyze the spread of information on social networks, Ferrara and a team from the Technical University of Denmark deployed a network of algorithm-driven Twitter accounts, or social bots, programmed to spread positive messages on Twitter.

"We found that bots can be used to run interventions on social media that trigger or foster good behaviors," says Ferrara, whose previous research focused on the proliferation of bots in the election campaign.

But it also revealed another intriguing pattern: information is much more likely to become viral when people are exposed to the same piece of information multiple times through multiple sources.

"This milestone shatters a long-held belief that ideas spread like an infectious disease, or contagion, with each exposure resulting in the same probability of infection," says Ferrara.

"Now we have seen empirically that when you are exposed to a given piece of information multiple times, your chances of adopting this information increase every time."

collect
0
Carol England 2018-01-09
img

Principal investigator and ISI research team leader Scott Miller, ISI computer scientist Jonathan May, ISI research lead Elizabeth Boschee--with senior advisors Prem Natarajan, ISI's Michael Keston executive director and research professor of computer science, and Kevin Knight, ISI research director and Dean's professor of computer science--are leading a team of about 30 researchers, including academics from the University of Massachusetts, Northeastern University, MIT, RPI, and the University of Notre Dame.

The ISI team's project is called SARAL, which stands for Summarization and domain-Adaptive Retrieval (a Hindi word whose translations include "simple" and "ingenious"), and includes experts in machine translation, speech recognition, morphology, information retrieval, representation, and summarization.

"The overall objective is to provide a Google-like capability, except the queries are in English but the retrieved documents are in a low-resource foreign language," says Miller, who is based at ISI's newest office in Boston, MA.

"The aim is to retrieve relevant foreign-language documents and to provide English summaries explaining how each document is relevant to the English query."

Over the course of the project, the team will receive additional languages to translate using the systems.

Although so-called "low resource" languages are often spoken by millions of people worldwide, relatively little written material exists in these languages.

collect
0
Eric Vela 2019-05-30
img

USC Viterbi's Information Sciences Institute (ISI) and the Intel Corporation's custom foundry organization today announced a collaboration to design, fabricate and package integrated circuits (ICs) through USC ISI's MOSIS unit.

The collaboration combines MOSIS's industry-leading integrated circuit manufacturing expertise with Intel's high-performance complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication and packaging technology.

It positions ISI and Intel Custom Foundry (ICF) to lead a new era of high-performance microelectronic manufacturing for the U.S. and global IC community.

"This is a significant event for the U.S. microelectronics community," said MOSIS co-director John Damoulakis.

"For the first time, the U.S. Government, R laboratories, companies, and academia will have access to Intel's advanced fabrication and packaging technologies economically through MOSIS."

MOSIS will offer multi-project-wafer runs for prototype integrated circuits, as well as dedicated runs for low-volume production.

Jim Evans 2021-06-17
img
(University of Southern California) Anti-science attitudes and political ideology often go hand in hand, a new USC study finds, which means machine-analyzed data on platforms such as Twitter could offer clues as to where diseases like COVID-19 might spread.
Mike Estes 2021-07-14
img
(University of Southern California) Before Millennials were over laugh-cry emojis, they were the most used emojis across the world, according to researchers at USC. The emoji was more popular than smiley faces say researchers who categorized millions of tweets across 30 countries and evaluated over 1700 emojis. Their study, "An empirical study of emoji usage on Twitter in linguistic and national contexts" was published in Online Social Networks and Media.
Bill Brown 2019-07-25
img

From a confidence trick originating in the late 19th century, to sophisticated AI that can manipulate reality, recreating anyone's face or voice with almost pinpoint accuracy--spam has come a long way.

But what does the future of digital spam look like, what risks could it pose to our personal security and privacy, and what can we do to fight it?

In a new paper, which appeared in the August 2019 issue of Communications of the ACM (CACM), Emilio Ferrara, a USC research assistant professor in computer science and research team leader at USC Viterbi's Information Sciences Institute, tracks the evolution of digital spam and explores its complex, and often surprising, history.

"Scams not only exploit technical vulnerabilities; they exploit human ones."

Social media spam bots, which automatically produce content and interact with humans, have allowed spammers to scale their operations to an unprecedented level.

(Ferrara explores this in his 2016 CACM paper, The Rise of Social Bots).

James Mcgaugh 2018-04-09
img

A new study from Pew Research Center found that the majority of links to content from popular websites are being tweeted by bots.

“We hope that these findings will help illustrate the extent to which bots play a really prominent and pervasive role in posting links to prominent sites and help inform more broadly about automated accounts,” said Aaron Smith, Pew associate director.

“It is also worth highlighting that we are in no way implying that the posts that we looked at are illegitimate or problematic because they are automated.”

Emilio Ferrara, a research assistant professor for the Information Sciences Institute at the University of Southern California’s Viterbi School of Engineering, took a more critical view, saying, “The Pew study focuses on data from summer 2017.

Hopefully, the situation improved after Twitter’s recent attempts to mitigate the bot issue.

Our current research tries to determine if bots’ influence is unchanged, if bots evolved to escape new Twitter’s detection algorithms and if they are still heavily involved and an integral part of the Twitter conversation on topics like politics and social issues.”

Ruth Johnson 2017-10-24
img

USC's Information Sciences Institute will lead a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) initiative among universities to develop large-scale simulations of online behavior in complex social networks.

Emilio Ferrara, a USC ISI research leader and research assistant professor in the department of computer science at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, will lead the project with Kristina Lerman, a USC ISI research team leader and research associate professor in the department of computer science at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering.

Indiana University and the University of Notre Dame will collaborate with USC ISI on the four-year project, titled Cognitive Online Simulation of Information Network Environments (COSINE).

Social media use is rapidly increasing across the world, with tens of billions of messages and posts shared every day.

"This is important, as we are now seeing how the information we receive online can affect our offline behaviors, personal beliefs and opinions," adds Lerman.

Leveraging the existing capabilities of ISI's Cyber Defense Technology Experimental Research (DETER) Laboratory, COSINE researchers will create a virtual lab to study the factors that influence online social dynamics, including message content, variance in emotion and cognitive biases.

Thomas Gibson 2016-11-08
img

Twitter bots are believed to be driving the political discourse on social media on behalf of both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, according to a new report released by a pair of University of Southern California professors just ahead of Election Day 2016.

We investigated how social bots, automatic accounts that populate the Twitter-sphere, are distorting the online discussion about the 2016 U.S. Presidential elections, Emilio Ferrara, who teamed up with fellow USC professor Alessandro Bessi on the study, wrote in a post.About 19 percent of the election-related posts on the microblogging network created between Sept. 16 and Oct. 21 were produced by robots rather than human beings, the USC study determined.

By leveraging state-of-the-art social bot-detection algorithms, we uncovered a large fraction of user population that may not be human, professors Ferrara and Bessi, both with the Information Sciences Institute at USC, stated in their research paper.

They account for a significant portion of generated content.

The professors conducting the study analyzed 20 million election-related tweets and discovered that robots created 3.8 million of those tweets.

Our findings suggest that the presence of social media bots can indeed negatively affect democratic political discussion rather than improving it, professors Ferrara and Bessi wrote in their paper titled, Social Bots Distort the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election Online Discussion.

Wayne Konwinski 2017-09-22
img

After an election year marked by heated exchanges and the distribution of fake news, Twitter bots earned a bad reputation--but not all bots are bad, suggests a new study co-authored by Emilio Ferrara, a USC Information Sciences Institute computer scientist and a research assistant professor at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering's Department of Computer Science.

In a large-scale experiment designed to analyze the spread of information on social networks, Ferrara and a team from the Technical University of Denmark deployed a network of algorithm-driven Twitter accounts, or social bots, programmed to spread positive messages on Twitter.

"We found that bots can be used to run interventions on social media that trigger or foster good behaviors," says Ferrara, whose previous research focused on the proliferation of bots in the election campaign.

But it also revealed another intriguing pattern: information is much more likely to become viral when people are exposed to the same piece of information multiple times through multiple sources.

"This milestone shatters a long-held belief that ideas spread like an infectious disease, or contagion, with each exposure resulting in the same probability of infection," says Ferrara.

"Now we have seen empirically that when you are exposed to a given piece of information multiple times, your chances of adopting this information increase every time."

Issac Pierce 2019-01-28
img

In a new study, USC researchers used machine learning to identify potential blood-based markers of Alzheimer's disease that could help with earlier diagnosis and lead to non-invasive ways of tracking the progress of the disease in patients.

The method was developed by USC computer science research assistant professor Greg Ver Steeg, a senior research lead at the USC Information Sciences Institute (ISI).

"This type of analysis is a novel way of discovering patterns of data to identify key diagnostic markers of disease," said team member Paul Thompson, the associate director of the USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute and professor in the Keck School of Medicine at USC.

The study, "Uncovering Biologically Coherent Peripheral Signatures of Health and Risk for Alzheimer's Disease in the Aging Brain," appeared in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, The study authors are from the USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute and the USC Information Sciences Institute.

While most Alzheimer's research to date has focused on known hypotheses, such as the build up of amyloid plaque and tau protein in the brain, both measures have proved tricky to measure in the bloodstream.

As a result, neuroscientists at USC wondered if there could be other "hidden" indicators of Alzheimer's--factors that could be detected with a routine blood test.

Cornelius Jones 2016-08-04
img

What do a Welsh mezzo-soprano, a castle in the southwest of England, and a quantum computer in Los Angeles have in common?

Answer: they all teamed up recently for a musical performance that, according to its creator, represents the first computer music algorithm implemented on a quantum computer and the first live use of explicit quantum processes in an artistic piece.

Essentially the idea behind the performance was to give an astonishingly powerful quantum computer the opportunity to create music alongside a trained human classical singer.

In a 15-minute piece, broken into three different movements, mezzo-soprano Juliette Pochin had her voice sent across the internet to the quantum D-Wave machine at the University of South California s Information Sciences Institute in Marina Del Rey.

There are three subsystems involved , organizer Alexis Kirke, senior research fellow at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research at England s Plymouth University, told Digital Trends.

The laptop has a sound generator and communications server in the room with Juliette.

Elizabeth Tinnin 2018-10-03
img

That's what computer scientist, Ewa Deelman, a research director at USC Information Sciences Institute (ISI), does.

As scientists work with myriad data points and pull in data from sensors all over the world, they need to work collaboratively utilize distributed resources to do complex scientific computations.

One can say she creates the complex cyber 'plumbing' so that data can flow freely between, and be crunched easily by researchers to advance scientific knowledge.

Deelman's systems have been leveraged by the Nobel Prize winning scientists who directly detected gravitational waves and by biologists and seismologists.

Her lab at USC ISI will now lead an effort to conduct a pilot study for a potential Cyberinfrastructure Center of Excellence.

Collaborating with computer scientists at the University of North Carolina's Renaissance Computing Institute, the University of Utah, Indiana University and the University of Notre Dame she will work on developing a cyberinfrastructure blueprint that could support scientists working on various high-profile National Science Foundation (NSF) programs.

John Dumlao 2021-06-28
img
(University of Southern California) Researchers identified similar tweets by using natural language processing and neural networks to create clusters of alike tweets.They then compared tweets of New Yorkers versus Angelenos.
Joan Zappulla 2016-08-20
img

In July 2016, Lockheed Martin made improvements to the Quantum Computation Center housed at the USC Information Sciences Institute, increasing its qubit capacity to 1,098.

It s latest step in a process that s been going on for six and a half years, as the international security and aerospace company attempts to carve out a space in the fast-moving field of quantum computing.

In twenty years, this technology could have a huge impact on everything from academic research projects to online cybersecurity — but Lockheed Martin s usage demonstrates that some of the benefits of quantum computing could be even closer to fruition, even if a fully functional quantum computer is a ways off.

The first quantum system that Lockheed Martin bought from D-Wave was a 128-qubit processor codenamed Rainier, which otherwise went by the name D-Wave One.

It was later upgraded to the 512-qubit Vesuvius, which was itself recently upgraded to the 1,152-qubit D-Wave 2X.

Validation and verification was the inspiration for the program, but now it s expanding into other areas.

John Bloodsaw 2020-09-29
img
(University of Southern California) The researchers at USC have made some discoveries about the network behind the Panama Papers, uncovering uniquely fragmented network behavior and transactions. This is vastly different from more traditional social or organizational networks, demonstrating why these systems of transactions and associations are so robust and difficult to infiltrate or take down
Wesley Reese 2019-08-07
img

To better serve families at risk for these conditions, scientists need a comprehensive and systematic understanding of how the faces of healthy children form and what goes wrong to cause common malformations, such as cleft lip and palate.

With this in mind, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) launched FaceBase, a central repository for craniofacial datasets and tools meant to advance craniofacial science by fostering cooperation and collaboration around the globe.

The project's principal investigators are Carl Kesselman, professor at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering Department of Computer Science and director of the Biomedical Data Center at USC's Information Sciences Institute, and Yang Chai, associate dean of research for the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC and director of the Center of Craniofacial and Molecular Biology.

"This NIDCR supported Craniofacial Development and Dysmorphology Data Management and Integration Hub will continue to develop towards a comprehensive resource for researchers around the globe and highlights the leadership provided by interdisciplinary researchers at USC to bring oral and craniofacial research to the next level of excellence."

The major goal of the FaceBase Consortium is to advance research by creating comprehensive datasets of craniofacial development and dysmorphologies, or birth defects, and to disseminate these datasets to the wider craniofacial research community.

Cleft lip and palate are amongst the most common of all birth defects.

Carol England 2018-01-09
img

Principal investigator and ISI research team leader Scott Miller, ISI computer scientist Jonathan May, ISI research lead Elizabeth Boschee--with senior advisors Prem Natarajan, ISI's Michael Keston executive director and research professor of computer science, and Kevin Knight, ISI research director and Dean's professor of computer science--are leading a team of about 30 researchers, including academics from the University of Massachusetts, Northeastern University, MIT, RPI, and the University of Notre Dame.

The ISI team's project is called SARAL, which stands for Summarization and domain-Adaptive Retrieval (a Hindi word whose translations include "simple" and "ingenious"), and includes experts in machine translation, speech recognition, morphology, information retrieval, representation, and summarization.

"The overall objective is to provide a Google-like capability, except the queries are in English but the retrieved documents are in a low-resource foreign language," says Miller, who is based at ISI's newest office in Boston, MA.

"The aim is to retrieve relevant foreign-language documents and to provide English summaries explaining how each document is relevant to the English query."

Over the course of the project, the team will receive additional languages to translate using the systems.

Although so-called "low resource" languages are often spoken by millions of people worldwide, relatively little written material exists in these languages.