logo
logo
logo
logo
Paul Cork 2016-08-31
img

We have all seen the folks who talk to their dogs like they are humans, not that anything is wrong with that.

Each time I see someone talking to their dog, I always wonder if the dog actually understands what they are saying.

A new study published in the September 2 issue of Science shows that dogs do in fact understand some human words and understand those words regardless of intonation used.

The data from the study could provide important insight into how neural networks understand speech.

"We humans also love talking to dogs all the time.

We praise them, call them," said Attila Andics of Eötvös Loránd University, lead author of the study.

collect
0
Brandon Gaither 2016-08-30

Understanding speech requires a specific set of skills that was, until now, thought to be uniquely human.

New research however has found that dogs also possess very similar skills to us and may even be able to understand what their owner is saying, in terms of intonation at the very least.

The two mechanisms needed to understand speech are words, the building blocks of human language, and intonation, the highs and lows of pitch that convey information in speech.

The study, to published in the journal Science on September 2, looked into whether dogs also depend on both of these mechanisms.

It found that canines have the ability to distinguish vocabulary words and the intonation of human speech because they possess brain regions similar to those of humans.

In particular, the team at Eötvös Loránd University found that vocabulary learning, does not appear to be a uniquely human capacity that follows from the emergence of language, but rather a more ancient function that can be exploited to link arbitrary sound sequences to meanings.

collect
0
Charlie Warren 2017-04-28
img

Amazon have released a set of commands that developers can use to make Alexa, the voice assistant currently found in the Amazon Echo and the Amazon Echo Dot, follow a more speech natural pattern.

The way Alexa speaks at the moment sounds pretty human, but there are obvious ‘tells’ in the lack of intonation, pitch change and pause that give away that it’s an artificial voice.

These new commands are designed to make her voice feel more human, report TechCrunch.

There are five commands: Whisper, Expletive Beeps, Sub, Emphasis, and Prosody.

All of the commands are designed to frame a specific set of words within Alexa’s script so she knows which words to apply the command to.

Whisper and Expletive Beeps are both fairly self-explanatory, and have easily imaginable (and pretty funny) possible uses.

collect
0
Paul Cork 2016-08-31
img

We have all seen the folks who talk to their dogs like they are humans, not that anything is wrong with that.

Each time I see someone talking to their dog, I always wonder if the dog actually understands what they are saying.

A new study published in the September 2 issue of Science shows that dogs do in fact understand some human words and understand those words regardless of intonation used.

The data from the study could provide important insight into how neural networks understand speech.

"We humans also love talking to dogs all the time.

We praise them, call them," said Attila Andics of Eötvös Loránd University, lead author of the study.

Charlie Warren 2017-04-28
img

Amazon have released a set of commands that developers can use to make Alexa, the voice assistant currently found in the Amazon Echo and the Amazon Echo Dot, follow a more speech natural pattern.

The way Alexa speaks at the moment sounds pretty human, but there are obvious ‘tells’ in the lack of intonation, pitch change and pause that give away that it’s an artificial voice.

These new commands are designed to make her voice feel more human, report TechCrunch.

There are five commands: Whisper, Expletive Beeps, Sub, Emphasis, and Prosody.

All of the commands are designed to frame a specific set of words within Alexa’s script so she knows which words to apply the command to.

Whisper and Expletive Beeps are both fairly self-explanatory, and have easily imaginable (and pretty funny) possible uses.

Brandon Gaither 2016-08-30

Understanding speech requires a specific set of skills that was, until now, thought to be uniquely human.

New research however has found that dogs also possess very similar skills to us and may even be able to understand what their owner is saying, in terms of intonation at the very least.

The two mechanisms needed to understand speech are words, the building blocks of human language, and intonation, the highs and lows of pitch that convey information in speech.

The study, to published in the journal Science on September 2, looked into whether dogs also depend on both of these mechanisms.

It found that canines have the ability to distinguish vocabulary words and the intonation of human speech because they possess brain regions similar to those of humans.

In particular, the team at Eötvös Loránd University found that vocabulary learning, does not appear to be a uniquely human capacity that follows from the emergence of language, but rather a more ancient function that can be exploited to link arbitrary sound sequences to meanings.