logo
logo
logo
logo
Danny Knackstedt 2016-07-06
img

View photosMoreAn automated Twitter account is posting all 2.6 million words from the report.

The result of the Chilcot Inquiry has made headlines not just for its contents reflecting the Iraq war, but also just how large it was.

At 2.6 million words, it s a comprehensive summary of the events surrounding the conflict.

It was also kept incredibly secret up to its publication.

Now that the findings are public, someone has take it upon themselves to ensure the full report reaches as many people as possible and so has created a Twitter bot that is tweeting out the entire report, 140 characters at a time.

In 2003, for the first time since the Second World War, the United Kingdom took part in an opposed invasion and

collect
0
Adolfo Lorenzo 2016-07-06
img

Left: Former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair Right: Former US President George W. Bush

The Chilcot report has become a national byword for delays, but the long-awaited inquiry into the Iraq war has finally arrived.

Here s what you need to know.

On Wednesday, July 6, Sir John Chilcot s extensive inquiry into the Iraq war, including the build up to, and aftermath of, the 2003 invasion is published.

It s expected to be the most wide-ranging investigation into Britain s role in the war, and has been in the works since then-Prime Minister Gordon Brown kicked off proceedings back in 2009.

How to get Chilcot report free online

collect
0
Charles Janow 2016-07-06
img

Also: Iraq war 'unnecessary', Blair overestimated' own ability

Sir John Chilcot, who today delivered his much-awaited report into the Iraq war, ran an impressively tight ship when it came to IT spending.

The IT and telecommunications spending for Chilcot s six-volume, 2.6 million word report, which is published today, amounted to £695,300 over the Iraq Inquiry s seven years of work, which cost £30,854,800 in total.

Only £94,300 was spent in this area during 2014/15, however; a whopping 6.9 per cent of that year's total £1,358,500 spending.

The costs for 2015/16 have not yet been released.

According to The Register's beer-mat calculations, this is significantly under the average public sector IT spending of 3.5 per cent of budget.

collect
0
Matt Ouellette 2016-07-05
img

Your browser does not support HTML5 videoPlayPausePlayPauseMute0%00:00 / 00:00FullscreenSmallscreen Close Embed Feed Julian Assange: Vivienne Westwood hopes UN can break the national conspiracy IBTimes UK

One of the world's largest whistleblowing platforms WikiLeaks has released over 1,000 emails from US presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton's private server relating to the Iraq War, during her time served as the US Secretary of State.

WikiLeaks tweeted a link to 1,258 Clinton emails on 4 July, which were sent and received by the US Democratic presidential candidate and were related to the country's engagement in the Iraq War.

According to a report by The Hill, the email trove is a part of Clinton's correspondence that was released by the US State Department in February, which WikiLeaks went through to put together a list of all the emails specifically referencing the Iraq War.

The report, also known as the Iraq inquiry, is a British public inquiry launched to determine the country's role in the Iraq War.

The report is expected to be published on 6 July and may see former British politicians like Tony Blair face severe criticism and possible legal action for their roles in the war.

collect
0
Vivian Matthews 2020-09-24
img
Defence secretary Ben Wallace

Downing Street has been forced to clarify the defence secretary’s claim that the UK has previously fought “illegal wars”, in an apparent reference to Iraq.

Prime minister Boris Johnson’s official spokesperson said Ben Wallace was expressing a “personal view” when he accused Labour of presiding over “illegal wars” when in government.

The spokesperson added: “Neither the government nor the Chilcot inquiry has expressed a view as to whether the UK’s participation in the war was legal.”

It bore resemblance to when Nick Clegg was forced to clarify his claim that the Iraq war was illegal when he was deputy prime minister in 2010, amid fears it could aid charges against the government in international courts.

It is the second embarrassment for Wallace this month, having been forced to apologise for breaking social distancing rules by shaking a man’s hand on his way to a cabinet meeting.

He made his “illegal wars” comments during a heated Commons debate on laws to limit prosecutions against troops for actions taken in operations overseas. 

At one stage, Wallace told Labour shadow defence secretary John Healey: “Much of the mess we are having to come and clean up today is because of your illegal wars, your events in the past, and the way you have run the safety for our forces.” 

Healey hit back: “That is not worthy of the office of the secretary of state for defence”.

Tony Blair’s Labour government has long faced widespread criticism for pushing UK forces into wars into Iraq and Afghanistan.

In 2004, United Nations secretary general Kofi Annan said the US-led invasion of Iraq a year prior was “illegal” because it contravened the UN charter.

The Chilcot inquiry found in 2016 that the UK decided to take military action in Iraq before all other peaceful options had been carried out and undermined the UN Security Council in the run up to the invasion, in which more than 150,000 Iraqis died, and a million more were displaced.

collect
0
Danny Knackstedt 2016-07-06
img

View photosMoreAn automated Twitter account is posting all 2.6 million words from the report.

The result of the Chilcot Inquiry has made headlines not just for its contents reflecting the Iraq war, but also just how large it was.

At 2.6 million words, it s a comprehensive summary of the events surrounding the conflict.

It was also kept incredibly secret up to its publication.

Now that the findings are public, someone has take it upon themselves to ensure the full report reaches as many people as possible and so has created a Twitter bot that is tweeting out the entire report, 140 characters at a time.

In 2003, for the first time since the Second World War, the United Kingdom took part in an opposed invasion and

Charles Janow 2016-07-06
img

Also: Iraq war 'unnecessary', Blair overestimated' own ability

Sir John Chilcot, who today delivered his much-awaited report into the Iraq war, ran an impressively tight ship when it came to IT spending.

The IT and telecommunications spending for Chilcot s six-volume, 2.6 million word report, which is published today, amounted to £695,300 over the Iraq Inquiry s seven years of work, which cost £30,854,800 in total.

Only £94,300 was spent in this area during 2014/15, however; a whopping 6.9 per cent of that year's total £1,358,500 spending.

The costs for 2015/16 have not yet been released.

According to The Register's beer-mat calculations, this is significantly under the average public sector IT spending of 3.5 per cent of budget.

Vivian Matthews 2020-09-24
img
Defence secretary Ben Wallace

Downing Street has been forced to clarify the defence secretary’s claim that the UK has previously fought “illegal wars”, in an apparent reference to Iraq.

Prime minister Boris Johnson’s official spokesperson said Ben Wallace was expressing a “personal view” when he accused Labour of presiding over “illegal wars” when in government.

The spokesperson added: “Neither the government nor the Chilcot inquiry has expressed a view as to whether the UK’s participation in the war was legal.”

It bore resemblance to when Nick Clegg was forced to clarify his claim that the Iraq war was illegal when he was deputy prime minister in 2010, amid fears it could aid charges against the government in international courts.

It is the second embarrassment for Wallace this month, having been forced to apologise for breaking social distancing rules by shaking a man’s hand on his way to a cabinet meeting.

He made his “illegal wars” comments during a heated Commons debate on laws to limit prosecutions against troops for actions taken in operations overseas. 

At one stage, Wallace told Labour shadow defence secretary John Healey: “Much of the mess we are having to come and clean up today is because of your illegal wars, your events in the past, and the way you have run the safety for our forces.” 

Healey hit back: “That is not worthy of the office of the secretary of state for defence”.

Tony Blair’s Labour government has long faced widespread criticism for pushing UK forces into wars into Iraq and Afghanistan.

In 2004, United Nations secretary general Kofi Annan said the US-led invasion of Iraq a year prior was “illegal” because it contravened the UN charter.

The Chilcot inquiry found in 2016 that the UK decided to take military action in Iraq before all other peaceful options had been carried out and undermined the UN Security Council in the run up to the invasion, in which more than 150,000 Iraqis died, and a million more were displaced.

Adolfo Lorenzo 2016-07-06
img

Left: Former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair Right: Former US President George W. Bush

The Chilcot report has become a national byword for delays, but the long-awaited inquiry into the Iraq war has finally arrived.

Here s what you need to know.

On Wednesday, July 6, Sir John Chilcot s extensive inquiry into the Iraq war, including the build up to, and aftermath of, the 2003 invasion is published.

It s expected to be the most wide-ranging investigation into Britain s role in the war, and has been in the works since then-Prime Minister Gordon Brown kicked off proceedings back in 2009.

How to get Chilcot report free online

Matt Ouellette 2016-07-05
img

Your browser does not support HTML5 videoPlayPausePlayPauseMute0%00:00 / 00:00FullscreenSmallscreen Close Embed Feed Julian Assange: Vivienne Westwood hopes UN can break the national conspiracy IBTimes UK

One of the world's largest whistleblowing platforms WikiLeaks has released over 1,000 emails from US presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton's private server relating to the Iraq War, during her time served as the US Secretary of State.

WikiLeaks tweeted a link to 1,258 Clinton emails on 4 July, which were sent and received by the US Democratic presidential candidate and were related to the country's engagement in the Iraq War.

According to a report by The Hill, the email trove is a part of Clinton's correspondence that was released by the US State Department in February, which WikiLeaks went through to put together a list of all the emails specifically referencing the Iraq War.

The report, also known as the Iraq inquiry, is a British public inquiry launched to determine the country's role in the Iraq War.

The report is expected to be published on 6 July and may see former British politicians like Tony Blair face severe criticism and possible legal action for their roles in the war.