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Brad Patterson 2018-03-20
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The ashes of Professor Stephen Hawking will be interred at Westminster Abbey near the grave of Sir Isaac Newton during a thanksgiving service later this year, a spokesman for the abbey said.

The Dean of Westminster, the Very Reverend Dr John Hall, said: “It is entirely fitting that the remains of Professor Stephen Hawking are to be buried in the Abbey, near those of distinguished fellow scientists.

“Sir Isaac Newton was buried in the Abbey in 1727.

“Charles Darwin was buried beside Isaac Newton in 1882.

“Other famous scientists are buried or memorialised nearby, the most recent burials being those of atomic physicists Ernest Rutherford in 1937 and Joseph John Thomson in 1940.

“We believe it to be vital that science and religion work together to seek to answer the great questions of the mystery of life and of the universe.”

collect
0
James Howard 2018-03-20

Professor Stephen Hawking’s ashes will be interred close to the remains of another of Britain’s greatest physicists, Sir Isaac Newton, in Westminster Abbey later this year.

He will also join the likes of Charles Darwin and a host of other famous names following a Service of Thanksgiving later this year, staff at the abbey said.

Professor Hawking passed away on March 14 this year at the age of 76 having become one of the most renowned scientists in his field despite his decades-long battle with motor neurone disease.

The Dean of Westminster, the Very Reverend Dr John Hall, said: “It is entirely fitting that the remains of Professor Stephen Hawking are to be buried in the Abbey, near those of distinguished fellow scientists.

“Sir Isaac Newton was buried in the Abbey in 1727.

Charles Darwin was buried beside Isaac Newton in 1882.

collect
0
Daniel Slye 2021-07-21
img
As Richard Branson and Jeff Bezos ride their rockets dozens of miles above our planet, let's learn about Isaac Newton and how we go about sending things whizzing around the Earth.
collect
0
Michael Wilson 2018-03-20
img

The final resting place of Professor Stephen Hawking was announced this week in London.

The theoretical physicist was announced to be honored at a Service of Thanksgiving later this year (2018) at Westminster Abbey.

At that time, Hawking’s ashes will be interred at the Abbey near scientific minds of similarly revered status.

“It is entirely fitting that the remains of Professor Stephen Hawking are to be buried in the Abbey, near those of distinguished fellow scientists,” said The Dean of Westminster, the Very Reverend Dr John Hall.

“Sir Isaac Newton was buried in the Abbey in 1727.

Charles Darwin was buried beside Isaac Newton in 1882.”

collect
0
David Bierman 2018-03-21
img

The cosmologist and science communicator, who died March 14 at age 76, will have his ashes interred in Westminster Abbey later this year, officials with the famous London church announced today (March 20).

"It is entirely fitting that the remains of Professor Stephen Hawking are to be buried in the Abbey, near those of distinguished fellow scientists.

Sir Isaac Newton was buried in the Abbey in 1727.

Charles Darwin was buried beside Isaac Newton in 1882," the Dean of Westminster, the Very Reverend John Hall, said in a statement.

[Stephen Hawking: A Physics Icon Remembered in Photos]

"Other famous scientists are buried or memorialized nearby, the most recent burials being those of atomic physicists Ernest Rutherford in 1937 and Joseph John Thomson in 1940," Hall added.

collect
0
Luke Hall 2017-12-14
img

Towering thinker Sir Isaac Newton carved a now-barely visible doodle of a windmill into a stone wall in his childhood home, according to a news release from the National Trust.

The drawing was discovered at Woolsthorpe Manor, the Lincolnshire, England,home where Newton was born in 1642, said the National Trust,which protects the house and other heritage sites in the United Kingdom.

Newton is famous for his laws of motion, theory of universal gravitationand an experiment that involved shooting sunlight through a prism to create a rainbow effect (and inspire a very famous Pink Floyd album cover).

[The Mysterious Physics of 7 Everyday Things]

Chris Pickup, an independent conservator and doctoral candidate at Nottingham Trent University in England made the discovery while investigating the manor.

Pickup used a photographic technique called reflectance transformation imaging (RTI).

collect
0
Dana Millard 2017-09-02

A couple of years ago, a small publisher called Kroncker Wallis issued a handsome, minimalist take on Isaac Newton’s Principia.

Now, the publisher is embarking on its next project: Euclid's Elements.

The publisher is using Kickstarter to fund this new edition.

Euclid’s Elements is a mathematical text written by Greek mathematician Euclid around 300 BCE and has been called one of the most influential textbooks ever produced.

The treatisecontains 13 separate books, covering everything from plane geometry, the Pythagorean theorem, golden ratio, prime numbers, and quite a bit more.

The books helped to influence scientists such as Nicolaus Copernicus, Johannes Kepler, Galileo Galilei, and Sir Isaac Newton.

collect
0
Bruce Garland 2020-09-01
img

Artificial intelligence researcher and US Air Force Captain Eric Halloway recently published a fun thought experiment showing how simple it would be to prove we live in one of multiple universes. His theory relies on inventing a quantum coin-flipper and using a ray gun to vaporize an unknowable number of people across the entire spectrum of the multiverse. Basically, it’s the plot of Avengers: Endgame. Here’s the gist: Quantum physics tells us that quantum particles exist in a state called superposition until they’re measured. If you imagine a quantum particle as a coin, it’s neither heads nor tails and both…

This story continues at The Next Web
collect
0
Barry Polanco 2017-09-28
img

This year marks the 375th anniversary of the birth of Isaac Newton, the famed physicist who gave us calculus, the laws of motion, and an irrational fear of apples falling on our head for no good reason.

To commemorate the occasion the Royal Mint has produced a special edition 50p coin, and some of them have started going into circulation.

The downside is that you're not likely to get one of these as change with your morning coffee.

At the moment only 375 of the coins have gone into active circulation, all in shops at Newton's birthplace and family home of Woolsthorpe Manor in Lincolnshire.

The Royal Mint says that more coins will be released into circulation "imminently", but hasn't specified when and where it will happen.

If you just can't wait, the Mint's shop is selling commemorative editions of the coin, with gold and silver proof variants available for ludicrous prices.

collect
0
Marion Kimberlin 2016-05-29
img

The great 17th century physicist Isaac Newton is known for many things.

His most fully worked-out example shows how prefixes could modify the meaning of tor, his word for temperature, to produce more specific meanings from exceedingly hot owtor , through pretty hot awtor , warm etor , indifferently cold aytor and extremely cold oytor , with all gradations in between.

Tolkien invented an Elvish language for his Lord of the Rings trilogy.

These fictional languages usually have limited vocabularies with only a few thousand words, and other than Esperanto—two million people speak it today, mostly concentrated in Europe, East Asia, and South America—they haven t really caught on.

True, a Klingon translation of Hamlet exists, and there s a small but passionate online community dedicated to learning the Na Vi language invented by Caltech linguistics professor Paul Frommer for Avatar.

The Principia wasn t going to write itself.

collect
0
Ronald Breau 2016-12-16
img

the auction house Christie's has beaten the new record for what someone paid for a vetenskapsbok after it sold a copy of Isaac Newton's Principia Mathematica for a little over 3.7 million dollars.

It is on the european first edition of the book, which was published in 1687 and only was released in 40 copies.

the auction house thought that the book would be sold for about 1.5 million dollars but this was exceeded thus far.

Principia Mathematica is one of the most important scientific books written when Newton which describes many of his theories, including gravity.

Much of what is described in the book are counted as the cornerstones of the physics than today.

collect
0
Leon Bailey 2016-05-29
img

The great 17th century physicist Isaac Newton is known for many things.

His most fully worked-out example shows how prefixes could modify the meaning of tor, his word for temperature, to produce more specific meanings from exceedingly hot owtor , through pretty hot awtor , warm etor , indifferently cold aytor and extremely cold oytor , with all gradations in between.

Tolkien invented an Elvish language for his Lord of the Rings trilogy.

These fictional languages usually have limited vocabularies with only a few thousand words, and other than Esperanto—two million people speak it today, mostly concentrated in Europe, East Asia, and South America—they haven t really caught on.

True, a Klingon translation of Hamlet exists, and there s a small but passionate online community dedicated to learning the Na Vi language invented by Caltech linguistics professor Paul Frommer for Avatar.

The Principia wasn t going to write itself.

collect
0
Steven Cusick 2018-05-25
img

We gather here today to pay our respects to a theory that was and is no longer, whose death tore our knowledge of the very universe to shreds.

Instead, a mysterious substance filled the cosmos like a vast ocean, suspending the stars and serving as the medium through which light travelled.

Even Isaac Newton once wrote:

Doth not the Refraction of Light proceed from the different density of this Æthereal Medium in different places, the Light receding always from the denser parts of the Medium?

Even physics great James Clerk Maxwell, whose equations reveal the speed of light, considered these ethereal ideas.

And physicists love when things make sense.

collect
0
Thomas Park 2017-03-10
img

A tabletop laser experiment is a modern outgrowth of the technology that enabled proving the absurd: that light didn't behave like a particle.

We have confidence that the Sun will rise and set not merely because it's always done so, but because the laws of physics, proven and validated throughout the centuries, dictate that this behavior must continue under these laws.

But sometimes, the predictions that a theory makes are patently absurd.

The only way to decide?

The bright and dark fringes that appear on the far side of a two-slit experiment performed with light can only be explained by a wave-like, rather than ray-like nature.

This sort of phenomenon could not be accounted for with any ray-based (or corpuscular-based) theory of light, but rather required that light fundamentally behaved as a wave.

collect
0
Keith Brewton 2020-09-18
img
Portrait of Italian astronomer and philosopher Galileo Galilei, whose works were among the stolen books.

Some 200 “culturally significant” books including works by Galileo, Sir Isaac Newton and Goya that were stolen in a west London heist have been found buried underground in Romania.

The books were swiped in January 2017 during a burglary in Feltham, which saw thieves cut holes in the roof of the warehouse they were being stored in and abseil down, thus avoiding sensors in a Mission Impossible-style break-in.

They were recovered this week by a joint partnership with the Met and the Romanian National Police.

The books, featuring works from the seventeenth century by Italian astronomer Galileo, Newton, and the eighteenth century Spanish painter Francisco Goya, have a combined value of more than £2.5 million, but are deemed to be of international importance and are considered irreplaceable.

Over the past three years the Met has been working with officers from the Romanian National Police and Italian Carabinieri, supported by Europol and Eurojust, on the international operation to recover the books and bring the offenders to justice.

In January 2017 they were being stored in a postal transit warehouse in Feltham waiting to be sent to Las Vegas for a specialist book auction.

Detective Inspector Andy Durham, from Specialist Crime South, said: “This recovery is a perfect end to this operation and is a demonstration of successful joint working between the Met and our European law enforcement partners in Romania and Italy - and at Europol and Eurojust. 

The stolen books were found underground in Romania 

“These books are extremely valuable, but more importantly they are irreplaceable and are of great importance to international cultural heritage.

“If it wasn’t for the hard work of Detective Constable David Ward and others in this Joint Investigation Team these books would have been sadly lost to the world forever.”

The Met investigation identified the suspects involved were part of a Romanian Organised Crime Group (OCG) that were responsible for high-value warehouse burglaries across the UK.

The OCG flies members into the UK to commit specific offences and then flies them out of the country shortly afterwards, with the stolen property taken out of the country by other OCG members using different transport methods.

The OCG is linked to a number of prominent Romanian crime families who form part of the Clamparu crime group. This group is based in the Iași region in Eastern Romania and have a history of complex and large-scale high value thefts, yet have mainly avoided prosecution by offending outside Romania.

A joint operation with the Romanian National Police and Italian Carabinieri, supported by Europol and Eurojust, has since unearthed another 11 offences in London and across the UK where a further £2 million worth of property has been stolen, generally using the same method of entering through the roof.

This culminated in coordinated arrests and searches of 45 addresses across the UK, Romania and Italy in June 2019.

Thirteen individuals were charged in the UK with conspiring to commit burglaries between December 2016 and April 2019, and to acquire criminal property.

Court proceedings are currently active, with 12 individuals having already pleaded guilty and sentencing is due to take place over four days, beginning on Monday, 28 September.

The thirteenth defendant will tried in March 2021.

Investigations have continued since the coordinated action in June 2019 and this has resulted in the further searches today that have led to the recovery of these books.

collect
0
James Howard 2018-03-20

Professor Stephen Hawking’s ashes will be interred close to the remains of another of Britain’s greatest physicists, Sir Isaac Newton, in Westminster Abbey later this year.

He will also join the likes of Charles Darwin and a host of other famous names following a Service of Thanksgiving later this year, staff at the abbey said.

Professor Hawking passed away on March 14 this year at the age of 76 having become one of the most renowned scientists in his field despite his decades-long battle with motor neurone disease.

The Dean of Westminster, the Very Reverend Dr John Hall, said: “It is entirely fitting that the remains of Professor Stephen Hawking are to be buried in the Abbey, near those of distinguished fellow scientists.

“Sir Isaac Newton was buried in the Abbey in 1727.

Charles Darwin was buried beside Isaac Newton in 1882.

Michael Wilson 2018-03-20
img

The final resting place of Professor Stephen Hawking was announced this week in London.

The theoretical physicist was announced to be honored at a Service of Thanksgiving later this year (2018) at Westminster Abbey.

At that time, Hawking’s ashes will be interred at the Abbey near scientific minds of similarly revered status.

“It is entirely fitting that the remains of Professor Stephen Hawking are to be buried in the Abbey, near those of distinguished fellow scientists,” said The Dean of Westminster, the Very Reverend Dr John Hall.

“Sir Isaac Newton was buried in the Abbey in 1727.

Charles Darwin was buried beside Isaac Newton in 1882.”

Luke Hall 2017-12-14
img

Towering thinker Sir Isaac Newton carved a now-barely visible doodle of a windmill into a stone wall in his childhood home, according to a news release from the National Trust.

The drawing was discovered at Woolsthorpe Manor, the Lincolnshire, England,home where Newton was born in 1642, said the National Trust,which protects the house and other heritage sites in the United Kingdom.

Newton is famous for his laws of motion, theory of universal gravitationand an experiment that involved shooting sunlight through a prism to create a rainbow effect (and inspire a very famous Pink Floyd album cover).

[The Mysterious Physics of 7 Everyday Things]

Chris Pickup, an independent conservator and doctoral candidate at Nottingham Trent University in England made the discovery while investigating the manor.

Pickup used a photographic technique called reflectance transformation imaging (RTI).

Bruce Garland 2020-09-01
img

Artificial intelligence researcher and US Air Force Captain Eric Halloway recently published a fun thought experiment showing how simple it would be to prove we live in one of multiple universes. His theory relies on inventing a quantum coin-flipper and using a ray gun to vaporize an unknowable number of people across the entire spectrum of the multiverse. Basically, it’s the plot of Avengers: Endgame. Here’s the gist: Quantum physics tells us that quantum particles exist in a state called superposition until they’re measured. If you imagine a quantum particle as a coin, it’s neither heads nor tails and both…

This story continues at The Next Web
Marion Kimberlin 2016-05-29
img

The great 17th century physicist Isaac Newton is known for many things.

His most fully worked-out example shows how prefixes could modify the meaning of tor, his word for temperature, to produce more specific meanings from exceedingly hot owtor , through pretty hot awtor , warm etor , indifferently cold aytor and extremely cold oytor , with all gradations in between.

Tolkien invented an Elvish language for his Lord of the Rings trilogy.

These fictional languages usually have limited vocabularies with only a few thousand words, and other than Esperanto—two million people speak it today, mostly concentrated in Europe, East Asia, and South America—they haven t really caught on.

True, a Klingon translation of Hamlet exists, and there s a small but passionate online community dedicated to learning the Na Vi language invented by Caltech linguistics professor Paul Frommer for Avatar.

The Principia wasn t going to write itself.

Leon Bailey 2016-05-29
img

The great 17th century physicist Isaac Newton is known for many things.

His most fully worked-out example shows how prefixes could modify the meaning of tor, his word for temperature, to produce more specific meanings from exceedingly hot owtor , through pretty hot awtor , warm etor , indifferently cold aytor and extremely cold oytor , with all gradations in between.

Tolkien invented an Elvish language for his Lord of the Rings trilogy.

These fictional languages usually have limited vocabularies with only a few thousand words, and other than Esperanto—two million people speak it today, mostly concentrated in Europe, East Asia, and South America—they haven t really caught on.

True, a Klingon translation of Hamlet exists, and there s a small but passionate online community dedicated to learning the Na Vi language invented by Caltech linguistics professor Paul Frommer for Avatar.

The Principia wasn t going to write itself.

Thomas Park 2017-03-10
img

A tabletop laser experiment is a modern outgrowth of the technology that enabled proving the absurd: that light didn't behave like a particle.

We have confidence that the Sun will rise and set not merely because it's always done so, but because the laws of physics, proven and validated throughout the centuries, dictate that this behavior must continue under these laws.

But sometimes, the predictions that a theory makes are patently absurd.

The only way to decide?

The bright and dark fringes that appear on the far side of a two-slit experiment performed with light can only be explained by a wave-like, rather than ray-like nature.

This sort of phenomenon could not be accounted for with any ray-based (or corpuscular-based) theory of light, but rather required that light fundamentally behaved as a wave.

Brad Patterson 2018-03-20
img

The ashes of Professor Stephen Hawking will be interred at Westminster Abbey near the grave of Sir Isaac Newton during a thanksgiving service later this year, a spokesman for the abbey said.

The Dean of Westminster, the Very Reverend Dr John Hall, said: “It is entirely fitting that the remains of Professor Stephen Hawking are to be buried in the Abbey, near those of distinguished fellow scientists.

“Sir Isaac Newton was buried in the Abbey in 1727.

“Charles Darwin was buried beside Isaac Newton in 1882.

“Other famous scientists are buried or memorialised nearby, the most recent burials being those of atomic physicists Ernest Rutherford in 1937 and Joseph John Thomson in 1940.

“We believe it to be vital that science and religion work together to seek to answer the great questions of the mystery of life and of the universe.”

Daniel Slye 2021-07-21
img
As Richard Branson and Jeff Bezos ride their rockets dozens of miles above our planet, let's learn about Isaac Newton and how we go about sending things whizzing around the Earth.
David Bierman 2018-03-21
img

The cosmologist and science communicator, who died March 14 at age 76, will have his ashes interred in Westminster Abbey later this year, officials with the famous London church announced today (March 20).

"It is entirely fitting that the remains of Professor Stephen Hawking are to be buried in the Abbey, near those of distinguished fellow scientists.

Sir Isaac Newton was buried in the Abbey in 1727.

Charles Darwin was buried beside Isaac Newton in 1882," the Dean of Westminster, the Very Reverend John Hall, said in a statement.

[Stephen Hawking: A Physics Icon Remembered in Photos]

"Other famous scientists are buried or memorialized nearby, the most recent burials being those of atomic physicists Ernest Rutherford in 1937 and Joseph John Thomson in 1940," Hall added.

Dana Millard 2017-09-02

A couple of years ago, a small publisher called Kroncker Wallis issued a handsome, minimalist take on Isaac Newton’s Principia.

Now, the publisher is embarking on its next project: Euclid's Elements.

The publisher is using Kickstarter to fund this new edition.

Euclid’s Elements is a mathematical text written by Greek mathematician Euclid around 300 BCE and has been called one of the most influential textbooks ever produced.

The treatisecontains 13 separate books, covering everything from plane geometry, the Pythagorean theorem, golden ratio, prime numbers, and quite a bit more.

The books helped to influence scientists such as Nicolaus Copernicus, Johannes Kepler, Galileo Galilei, and Sir Isaac Newton.

Barry Polanco 2017-09-28
img

This year marks the 375th anniversary of the birth of Isaac Newton, the famed physicist who gave us calculus, the laws of motion, and an irrational fear of apples falling on our head for no good reason.

To commemorate the occasion the Royal Mint has produced a special edition 50p coin, and some of them have started going into circulation.

The downside is that you're not likely to get one of these as change with your morning coffee.

At the moment only 375 of the coins have gone into active circulation, all in shops at Newton's birthplace and family home of Woolsthorpe Manor in Lincolnshire.

The Royal Mint says that more coins will be released into circulation "imminently", but hasn't specified when and where it will happen.

If you just can't wait, the Mint's shop is selling commemorative editions of the coin, with gold and silver proof variants available for ludicrous prices.

Ronald Breau 2016-12-16
img

the auction house Christie's has beaten the new record for what someone paid for a vetenskapsbok after it sold a copy of Isaac Newton's Principia Mathematica for a little over 3.7 million dollars.

It is on the european first edition of the book, which was published in 1687 and only was released in 40 copies.

the auction house thought that the book would be sold for about 1.5 million dollars but this was exceeded thus far.

Principia Mathematica is one of the most important scientific books written when Newton which describes many of his theories, including gravity.

Much of what is described in the book are counted as the cornerstones of the physics than today.

Steven Cusick 2018-05-25
img

We gather here today to pay our respects to a theory that was and is no longer, whose death tore our knowledge of the very universe to shreds.

Instead, a mysterious substance filled the cosmos like a vast ocean, suspending the stars and serving as the medium through which light travelled.

Even Isaac Newton once wrote:

Doth not the Refraction of Light proceed from the different density of this Æthereal Medium in different places, the Light receding always from the denser parts of the Medium?

Even physics great James Clerk Maxwell, whose equations reveal the speed of light, considered these ethereal ideas.

And physicists love when things make sense.

Keith Brewton 2020-09-18
img
Portrait of Italian astronomer and philosopher Galileo Galilei, whose works were among the stolen books.

Some 200 “culturally significant” books including works by Galileo, Sir Isaac Newton and Goya that were stolen in a west London heist have been found buried underground in Romania.

The books were swiped in January 2017 during a burglary in Feltham, which saw thieves cut holes in the roof of the warehouse they were being stored in and abseil down, thus avoiding sensors in a Mission Impossible-style break-in.

They were recovered this week by a joint partnership with the Met and the Romanian National Police.

The books, featuring works from the seventeenth century by Italian astronomer Galileo, Newton, and the eighteenth century Spanish painter Francisco Goya, have a combined value of more than £2.5 million, but are deemed to be of international importance and are considered irreplaceable.

Over the past three years the Met has been working with officers from the Romanian National Police and Italian Carabinieri, supported by Europol and Eurojust, on the international operation to recover the books and bring the offenders to justice.

In January 2017 they were being stored in a postal transit warehouse in Feltham waiting to be sent to Las Vegas for a specialist book auction.

Detective Inspector Andy Durham, from Specialist Crime South, said: “This recovery is a perfect end to this operation and is a demonstration of successful joint working between the Met and our European law enforcement partners in Romania and Italy - and at Europol and Eurojust. 

The stolen books were found underground in Romania 

“These books are extremely valuable, but more importantly they are irreplaceable and are of great importance to international cultural heritage.

“If it wasn’t for the hard work of Detective Constable David Ward and others in this Joint Investigation Team these books would have been sadly lost to the world forever.”

The Met investigation identified the suspects involved were part of a Romanian Organised Crime Group (OCG) that were responsible for high-value warehouse burglaries across the UK.

The OCG flies members into the UK to commit specific offences and then flies them out of the country shortly afterwards, with the stolen property taken out of the country by other OCG members using different transport methods.

The OCG is linked to a number of prominent Romanian crime families who form part of the Clamparu crime group. This group is based in the Iași region in Eastern Romania and have a history of complex and large-scale high value thefts, yet have mainly avoided prosecution by offending outside Romania.

A joint operation with the Romanian National Police and Italian Carabinieri, supported by Europol and Eurojust, has since unearthed another 11 offences in London and across the UK where a further £2 million worth of property has been stolen, generally using the same method of entering through the roof.

This culminated in coordinated arrests and searches of 45 addresses across the UK, Romania and Italy in June 2019.

Thirteen individuals were charged in the UK with conspiring to commit burglaries between December 2016 and April 2019, and to acquire criminal property.

Court proceedings are currently active, with 12 individuals having already pleaded guilty and sentencing is due to take place over four days, beginning on Monday, 28 September.

The thirteenth defendant will tried in March 2021.

Investigations have continued since the coordinated action in June 2019 and this has resulted in the further searches today that have led to the recovery of these books.