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Rodney Edson 2018-04-07
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For those who hate eating their vegetables, it’s easy to imagine that they’re actually toxic plants masquerading as food.

This includes veggies in the Cucurbitaceae family also called cucurbits or gourds (see gallery of family members below), which contain a class of poisons called cucurbitacins.

The toxic steroids are among the most bitter-tasting compounds biochemists have ever come across and, in the plants, they function as a defense against herbivores.

As such, consumers can occasionally come across super bitter gourds—and suffer what some researchers call toxic squash syndrome if they eat them.

Of those, more than 50 percent were due to squash consumed from a grocery store.

When it does happen, toxic squash syndrome is usually marked by diarrhea (sometimes bloody), vomiting, and abdominal pain, which can sometimes lead to dehydration, low blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, headaches, and vertigo.

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Edgar Williams 2018-07-05
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An unorthodox beauty treatment meant to rejuvenate the feet turned into a disturbing medical mystery for one young woman.

According to a case report published by her doctor in JAMA Dermatology, the woman’s toenails stopped growing and started falling off soon after she received a so-called fish pedicure.

Fish pedicures involve having small fish nibble at your feet while they’re soaked in a tub of warm or room temperature water.

The species of fish used — a toothless carp known as Garra rufa — are usually plant eaters, but in a pinch, they’ll also eat dead human skin.

The fish’s voracious feasting is said to help treat conditions like psoriasis as well as beautify the skin, lending them the nickname of “Doctor Fish.”

Unfortunately for the unnamed woman in her 20s, her experience was anything but rejuvenating.

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Thomas Brazier 2016-06-26

As a measure of how rapidly telemedicine is spreading, consider: More than 15 million Americans received some kind of medical care remotely last year, according to the American Telemedicine Association, a trade group, which expects those numbers to grow by 30% this year.

In a study in JAMA Dermatology last month, researchers posing as patients with skin problems sought help from 16 telemedicine sites—with unsettling results.

The American Medical Association this month approved new ethical guidelines for telemedicine, calling for participating doctors to recognize the limitations of such services and ensure that they have sufficient information to make clinical recommendations.

Jason Gorevic, CEO of Teladoc, which went public last year, says its doctors use more than 100 guidelines developed specifically for delivering care remotely, including a five-point scale for determining whether a sore throat is likely due to streptococcus infection that warrants antibiotics.

Health systems such as Mercy, the Mayo Clinic and the Cleveland Clinic that provide oversight and expertise on strokes, intensive-care units and other specialty care to networks of smaller hospitals typically charge those facilities a monthly fee, which generally cannot be charged to patients.

If not, the patient should talk to his primary-care physician about it, says Steve Ommen, a cardiologist who runs Mayo s Connected Care program.

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Diane Thomason 2020-07-20
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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, COVID-19 symptoms usually include fever, cough, aches and difficulty breathing, among others. A new study, however, suggests that skin rashes, which are not listed by the CDC, are also a sign of the deadly virus.
collect
0
Rodney Edson 2018-04-07
img

For those who hate eating their vegetables, it’s easy to imagine that they’re actually toxic plants masquerading as food.

This includes veggies in the Cucurbitaceae family also called cucurbits or gourds (see gallery of family members below), which contain a class of poisons called cucurbitacins.

The toxic steroids are among the most bitter-tasting compounds biochemists have ever come across and, in the plants, they function as a defense against herbivores.

As such, consumers can occasionally come across super bitter gourds—and suffer what some researchers call toxic squash syndrome if they eat them.

Of those, more than 50 percent were due to squash consumed from a grocery store.

When it does happen, toxic squash syndrome is usually marked by diarrhea (sometimes bloody), vomiting, and abdominal pain, which can sometimes lead to dehydration, low blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, headaches, and vertigo.

Thomas Brazier 2016-06-26

As a measure of how rapidly telemedicine is spreading, consider: More than 15 million Americans received some kind of medical care remotely last year, according to the American Telemedicine Association, a trade group, which expects those numbers to grow by 30% this year.

In a study in JAMA Dermatology last month, researchers posing as patients with skin problems sought help from 16 telemedicine sites—with unsettling results.

The American Medical Association this month approved new ethical guidelines for telemedicine, calling for participating doctors to recognize the limitations of such services and ensure that they have sufficient information to make clinical recommendations.

Jason Gorevic, CEO of Teladoc, which went public last year, says its doctors use more than 100 guidelines developed specifically for delivering care remotely, including a five-point scale for determining whether a sore throat is likely due to streptococcus infection that warrants antibiotics.

Health systems such as Mercy, the Mayo Clinic and the Cleveland Clinic that provide oversight and expertise on strokes, intensive-care units and other specialty care to networks of smaller hospitals typically charge those facilities a monthly fee, which generally cannot be charged to patients.

If not, the patient should talk to his primary-care physician about it, says Steve Ommen, a cardiologist who runs Mayo s Connected Care program.

Edgar Williams 2018-07-05
img

An unorthodox beauty treatment meant to rejuvenate the feet turned into a disturbing medical mystery for one young woman.

According to a case report published by her doctor in JAMA Dermatology, the woman’s toenails stopped growing and started falling off soon after she received a so-called fish pedicure.

Fish pedicures involve having small fish nibble at your feet while they’re soaked in a tub of warm or room temperature water.

The species of fish used — a toothless carp known as Garra rufa — are usually plant eaters, but in a pinch, they’ll also eat dead human skin.

The fish’s voracious feasting is said to help treat conditions like psoriasis as well as beautify the skin, lending them the nickname of “Doctor Fish.”

Unfortunately for the unnamed woman in her 20s, her experience was anything but rejuvenating.

Diane Thomason 2020-07-20
img
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, COVID-19 symptoms usually include fever, cough, aches and difficulty breathing, among others. A new study, however, suggests that skin rashes, which are not listed by the CDC, are also a sign of the deadly virus.